Existing FFGAs Fully Funded in the President's FY 2003 Budget Request

The following seven projects with existing FFGAs will not require additional funding in FY 2004, if the FY 2003 Congressional appropriation matches the Presidentís budget request for each project.

Atlanta/North Springs (North Line Extension)

The Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) has constructed a 2.3-mile, two-station extension of the North Line from the Dunwoody station to North Springs. This extension serves the rapidly-growing area north of Atlanta, which includes Perimeter Center and north Fulton County, and connects this area with the rest of the region by providing better transit service for both commuters and inner-city residents traveling to expanding job opportunities. Revenue operations began in December 2000. The daily ridership on the rail extension in the year 2005 is estimated at 33,000 riders, including 11,000 new riders.

On December 20, 1994, FTA issued an FFGA committing a total of $305.01 million in New Starts funding to this project. In the Conference Report to the FY 2000 appropriations act, FTA was directed to amend the FFGA for this project to incorporate a change in scope as authorized under Section 3030(d)(2) of TEA-21. Accordingly, on March 2, 2000, FTA amended the FFGA to include 28 additional railcars, a multilevel parking facility in lieu of a surface parking lot, and enhancements to customer security and amenity measures at the Sandy Springs and North Springs stations.

The total cost of the amended project is $463.18 million, with $370.54 million from the Section 5309 New Starts program. Of the $65.53 million increase in Federal funding, $10.66 million was applied from unexpended prior-year funds identified from cost savings on the Dunwoody section of the North Line extension. Including these prior-year funds, a total of $354.34 million has been appropriated for this project through FY 2002. The Administrationís FY 2003 budget proposal requested $16.11 million for this project, which would provide sufficient funds to complete the Federal funding commitment. If the FY 2003 Congressional appropriation provides the amount requested for this project, additional funding will not be required in FY 2004.

Boston/South Boston Piers Transitway Phase 

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) is developing an underground transitway to connect the existing transit system with the South Boston Piers area. The Piers area, which is connected to Bostonís central business district (CBD) by three local bridges, is undergoing significant development. Phase I of this project consists of a one-mile, three station bus tunnel between South Station and the Boston World Trade Center, with an intermediate stop at Fan Pier. Part of the construction is being coordinated with the Central Artery highway project. South Station serves the existing MBTA Red Line, as well as Amtrak and commuter rail and bus service. Daily ridership for the Transitway in 2010 is estimated to range from 22,000 trips in the lower-growth scenario to 34,100 trips in the high-growth scenario. The project is scheduled to open for revenue service in December 2004. The total estimated cost of Phase I is $601 million dollars.

Section 3035(j) of ISTEA directed FTA to enter into an FFGA for this project. On November 5, 1994, an FFGA was issued for Phase I, committing a total of $330.73 million in Section 5309 New Starts funding. Through FY 2002, a total of $330.05 million has been provided for this project. The Administrationís FY 2003 budget proposal requested $0.68 million for this project, which would provide sufficient funds to complete the Federal funding commitment. If the FY 2003 Congressional appropriation provides the amount requested by the President, additional funding will not be required in FY 2004.

Los Angeles/MOS-3 Extensions of Metro Rail (North Hollywood)

The Los Angeles Metro Rail Red Line rapid-rail system is being planned, programmed and constructed in phases, through a series of "Minimum Operable Segments" (MOSs). The first of these segments (MOS-1), a 4.4-mile, five-station segment, opened for revenue service in January 1993. A 2.1-mile, three-station segment of MOS-2 opened along Wilshire Boulevard in July 1996, and an additional 4.6-mile, 5-station segment of MOS-2 opened in June 1999. The Federal funding commitment for these two segments has been fulfilled. On May 14, 1993, an FFGA was issued to the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LACMTA) for the third construction phase, MOS-3.

MOS-3 was defined under ISTEA (Section 3034) to include three segments: the North Hollywood segment, a 6.3-mile, three-station subway extension of the Hollywood branch of MOS-2 to North Hollywood through the Santa Monica mountains; the Mid-City segment, a 2.3-mile, two-station western extension of the Wilshire Boulevard branch; and an undefined segment of the Eastside project, to the east from the existing Red Line terminus at Union Station. LACMTA later defined this eastern segment as a 3.7-mile, four-station extension under the Los Angeles River to First and Leona in East Los Angeles. On December 28, 1994, the FFGA for MOS-3 was amended to include this definition of the eastern segment, bringing the total commitment of Federal New Starts funds for MOS-3 to $1,416.49 million.

In January 1997, after delays in the project, FTA requested that LACMTA submit a Recovery Plan to demonstrate its ability to complete MOS-2 and MOS-3 while maintaining and operating the existing bus system. On January 14, 1998, the LACMTA Board of Directors voted to suspend and demobilize construction on all rail projects other than MOS-2 and the MOS-3 North Hollywood Extension. The MTA submitted a Recovery Plan to FTA on May 15, 1998, which was approved by FTA on July 2, 1998.

On June 9, 1997, FTA and LACMTA negotiated a revised FFGA covering the North Hollywood segment (Phase 1-A) of MOS-3. The North Hollywood Extension is 6.3 miles in length, with three stations, entirely in subway. It extends the Hollywood branch of the MOS-2 generally to the north under the Santa Monica Mountains to North Hollywood in the San Fernando Valley. When the North Hollywood extension opened for service in June 2000, ridership for the entire system doubled to approximately 125,000 daily boardings, far exceeding the projected daily boardings for 2010.

The total capital cost of the North Hollywood project is estimated at $1,310.82 million, of which the revised FFGA commits $681.04 million in Section 5309 New Starts funds. Through FY 2002, a total of $640.55 million has been appropriated for the North Hollywood section of MOS-3; an additional $40.49 million was requested in FY 2003. If the FY 2003 Congressional appropriation provides the amount requested for this project, additional funding will not be required in FY 2004.

Northern New Jersey/Hudson-Bergen MOS-1

The New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) is constructing a 9.6-mile, 16-station light rail line along the Hudson River Waterfront in Hudson County, from the Hoboken Terminal to 34th Street in Bayonne and Westside Avenue in Jersey City. This line is intended as the initial minimum operable segment (MOS-1) of a larger 21-mile, 30-station line extending from the Vince Lombardi park-and-ride lot in Bergen County to Bayonne, passing through Port Imperial in Weehauken, Hoboken, and Jersey City. The core of the completed system will serve the high-density commercial centers in Jersey City and Hoboken, and provide connections with NJ Transit commuter rail service, PATH trains to Newark and Manhattan, and the Port Imperial ferry from Weehauken to Manhattan. This initial operating segment is being constructed under a turnkey contract to design, build, operate, and maintain the system, which was awarded in October 1996. Total costs are expected to be $992.14 million for MOS-1. Construction began in December 1996. A portion of the MOS-1 line, between 34th Street and Exchange Place, opened in April 2000, and NJ Transit began revenue service from Exchange Place north to the Pavonia-Newport Station in November 2000. Full service to Hoboken Terminal began in Fall 2002. The full 21-mile system is expected to carry 94,500 riders per day.

The Department of Transportation issued an FFGA on October 15, 1996, that commits $604.09 million in Section 5309 New Starts funding for MOS-1. Through FY 2002, a total of $584.89 million has been appropriated for this project. In FY 2003, FTA requested $19.20 million in New Starts funding for the Hudson-Bergen MOS-1, completing the Federal commitment. If the FY 2003 Congressional appropriation provides the amount requested for this project, additional funding will not be required in FY 2004.

St. Louis/Metrolink St.Clair Extension

The Bi-State Development Agency (Bi-State) is developing a 26-mile extension of the Metrolink light rail line from downtown East St. Louis, Illinois to the Mid America Airport in St. Clair County. A 17.4-mile Minimum Operable Segment (MOS) extends from the current Metrolink terminal in downtown East St. Louis to Belleville Area College (now known as Southwest Illinois College). This segment consists of eight stations, seven park-and-ride lots, 20 new light rail vehicles, and a new maintenance facility in East St. Louis. The route makes extensive use of abandoned railroad rights-of-way. Revenue service began on May 5, 2001. The total capital cost of the St. Clair MOS is estimated at $339.20 million.

On October 17, 1996, FTA and Bi-State entered into an FFGA that commits a total of $243.93 million in Section 5309 New Starts funding to complete the 17.4-mile MOS to Southwest Illinois College and provides for extending the system to Mid-America Airport should funding become available at a later date. The funding committed to the MOS does not include $8.48 million in Federal New Starts funding provided prior to FY 1996, which brings total Federal funding for this project to $252.41 million under the New Starts program. Through FY 2002, a total of $249.04 million has been appropriated for this project. The Administrationís FY 2003 budget proposal requested $3.37 million for this project, which would provide sufficient funds to complete the Federal funding commitment. If the FY 2003 Congressional appropriation provides the amount requested for this project, additional funding will not be required in FY 2004.

Salt Lake City/CBD to University LRT

The Utah Transit Authority (UTA) has implemented a 2.5-mile, four-station light rail line in eastern Salt Lake City, from the downtown area to Rice-Eccles Stadium on the University of Utah campus. The line connects with the existing North/South line at Main Street and travels east along 400 South and 500 South to the stadium. The light rail vehicles are operating on city streets and property owned by Salt Lake City, the Utah Department of Transportation, and the University. The line is intended to significantly improve access to jobs, educational opportunities, health care, and housing throughout the 400 South corridor. The CBD to University line is scaled back from the originally proposed 10.9-mile West/East line from the airport to the university. UTA estimates ridership at 4,360 boardings per average weekday in January 2002. The line opened for service on December 15, 2001. Total capital costs are estimated at $118.50 million.

FTA issued an FFGA for the CBD to University LRT project on August 17, 2000, committing a total of $84.60 million in Section 5309 New Starts funds. This did not include $4.96 million in FY 2000 and prior year funding, which brings the total amount of New Starts funding for this project to $89.56 million. Including prior year funding, the total amount of Federal funds provided to this project through FY 2002 is $20.80 million. An additional $68.76 million was requested in FY 2003, which would provide sufficient funds to complete the Federal funding commitment. If the FY 2003 Congressional appropriation provides the amount requested for this project, additional funding will not be required in FY 2004.

Salt Lake City/North-South LRT

The Utah Transit Authority (UTA) has completed construction of a 15-mile light rail transit (LRT) line from downtown Salt Lake City to the southern suburbs. The line opened for regular weekday service on December 6, 1999. The system operates on city streets downtown for two miles and then follows a lightly-used railroad alignment owned by UTA to the suburban community of Sandy for 13 miles. This project is one component of the Interstate 15 corridor improvement initiative, which includes reconstruction of a parallel segment of I-15. Though original ridership projections for the South LRT system estimated daily ridership at 14,000 daily passengers in 2000 and 23,000 passengers by 2010, current ridership averages 19,000 weekday passengers. Total capital costs for this project were $312.49 million.

For the 2002 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games, this project connected major hotels and local residential areas with the Olympic venues for figure skating, medal rounds for ice hockey, and the International Broadcast Center, and connected with bus service to venues for speed skating, curling, and the Nordic alpine events.

On August 2, 1995, FTA issued an FFGA for this project that committed a total of $237.39 million in Federal New Starts funding. This does not include $6.60 million in prior year funds that were provided before the FFGA was issued, which brings the total amount of Section 5309 New Starts funding to $243.99 million. A total of $243.28 million was appropriated in FY 2001 and prior years; no new funding was provided in FY 2002. The Administrationís FY 2003 budget proposal requested $718,006 for this project, which would provide sufficient funds to complete the Federal funding commitment. If the FY 2003 Congressional appropriation provides the amount requested for this project, additional funding will not be required in FY 2004.