State Safety Oversight (SSO) Program Annual Report for 2005

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State Safety Oversight (SSO) Program Annual Report for 2005

Prepared by:

Federal Transit Administration
Office of Safety and Security
Washington, DC 20590
October 2006

Table of Contents

Background
Purpose of Report
SSO Community
Reporting Thresholds
Standardization
SSO Reportable Accidents
Three-Year Accident Trends Three-Year Accident Trends
Modal Considerations
Probable Cause
Results Results
Safety Priorities for SSO Community
Addressing Priorities
Top 10 Safety Action Items
Conclusion
Appendix A
Fatalities
Heavy Rail Fatalities
Light Rail Fatalities
Rail Grade Crossing Collisions
Injuries
Heavy Rail
Light Rail
Rail Grade Collisions
Appendix B

List of Exhibits

Exhibit 1: State Safety Oversight Community Map
Exhibit 2: State Safety Oversight Community, 2005
Exhibit 3: Rail Transit Industry Service Information, 2005
Exhibit 4: FTA-Reportable Accidents and Impacts, 2003 - 2005
Exhibit 5: Rail Transit Accident Rates per 10 Million Passenger Trips, 2003 - 2005
Exhibit 6: Heavy Rail – FTA-Reportable Accident Impacts, 2003 – 2005
Exhibit 7: Light Rail – FTA-Reportable Accident Impacts, 2003 - 2005
Exhibit 8: Other Rail – FTA-Reportable Accident Impacts, 2003 - 2005
Exhibit 9: Rates per 10 Million Passenger Trips, 2003 – 2005
Exhibit 10: Trended Rates per 10 Million Passenger Trips by Mode, 2003 – 2005
Exhibit 11: Probable Causes of Accidents, 2003 – 2005
Exhibit 12: Probable Causes of Accidents, Fatalities and Injuries, 2003 – 2005
Exhibit 13: FTA’s Safety Initiatives
Exhibit 14: Rail Transit Industry Safety Performance Target Goals for Improvement
Exhibit 15: SSO Agency Target Goals for Improvement
Exhibit A-1: Rail Transit Fatalities, 2003 – 2005
Exhibit A-2: Heavy Rail Fatalities, 2003 – 2005
Exhibit A-3: Light Rail Fatalities, 2003 - 2005
Exhibit A-4: Light Rail Collision Fatalities, 2003 - 2005
Exhibit A-5: Rail Grade Crossing Collision Fatalities, 2003 - 2005
Exhibit A-6: Rail Transit Injuries, 2003 – 2005
Exhibit A-7: Heavy Rail Injuries, 2003 - 2005
Exhibit A-8: Light Rail Injuries, 2003 - 2005
Exhibit A-9: Light Rail Collision Injuries, 2003 - 2005
Exhibit A-10: Light Rail Grade Crossing Collision Injuries, 2003 - 2005
Exhibit B-1: 2005 Probable Cause Distribution – Collisions, Derailments, Fires
Exhibit B-2: 2004 Probable Cause Distribution – Collisions, Derailments, Fires
Exhibit B-3: 2003 Probable Cause Distribution – Collisions, Derailments, Fires
Exhibit B-4: 2003 - 2005 Rail Grade Crossing Collision Probable Cause Distribution
Exhibit B-5: 2003 - 2005 Heavy Rail “Other” Accident Probable Cause Distribution
Exhibit B-6: 2003 - 2005 Light Rail “Other” Accident Probable Cause Distribution
Exhibit B-7: 2003 - 2005 Other Rail “Other” Accident Probable Cause Distribution

Background

In 1991, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) released a series of recommendations to the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) regarding the need for safety oversight of rail transit agencies by state government. In response to these recommendations, Congress added section 28 to the Federal Transit Act (codified at 49 U.S.C. section 5330). Based on this new authority, FTA developed a rule creating the first-ever, state-managed safety and security oversight program for rail transit agencies not regulated by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). This regulation was published as "Rail Fixed Guideway Systems; State Safety Oversight" on December 27, 1995 (codified at 49 CFR Part 659), subsequently referred to as the SSO Rule or Part 659. The safety requirements for Part 659 went into effect on January 1, 1997, and the security requirements went into effect one year later. FTA recently revised Part 659 in a Final Rule published on April 29, 2005.

FTA’s SSO rule stipulates that, among other activities, agencies designated by states to oversee rail transit safety and security must make annual reports to FTA. To facilitate this reporting, each January, FTA distributes an Annual Reporting Template to all SSO agencies. This template captures data pertaining to all reportable accidents, determined probable causes, corrective action plans, changes to program documentation, and agency resource allocation. SSO agencies submit their completed annual reports to FTA by March 15th of each year for the preceding calendar year.

Purpose of the Report

The 2005 SSO Annual Report presents safety data provided by the individual SSO agencies and offers industry-wide analysis regarding the types of accidents occurring, their probable causes, and the corresponding impacts of these accidents on passengers, employees, and property. This report documents the safety performance of the rail transit industry for the calendar year 2005 and includes comparison data from the previous two years. Results from this analysis may assist SSO and rail transit agencies in addressing 49 CFR Part 659 requirements and in developing management structures and work programs to effectively plan, implement, and evaluate safety and security-related programs for passenger service.

SSO and rail transit agencies can also use information provided in this report to identify accident trends, emerging issues, and to benchmark their performance against the industry average. Using this information, all involved parties can work more effectively toward the goal of eliminating transit-related deaths, injuries, and property damage.

FTA relies on the analysis of SSO annual report data to direct its safety oversight and technical assistance efforts toward those areas involving the highest risks for rail transit agencies. FTA also uses the evaluation of annual report data to determine the effectiveness of its own programs and to identify where improvements can be made.

SSO Community

The community of states and rail transit agencies affected by 49 CFR Part 659 has grown considerably over the last decade. Prior to 1997, there were six (6) designated SSO agencies overseeing the operations of 12 rail transit agencies. In 1997, when Part 659 went into effect, 19 SSO agencies were established to oversee 36 rail transit agencies. In 2005, 26 SSO agencies provided oversight to 44 rail transit agencies. By 2009, as many as six (6) new rail transit agencies and two (2) new oversight agencies may join the program.

Exhibit 1 below shows all States and rail transit agencies affected by Part 659 in 2005 and those states and rail transit agencies that will be affected within the next three years.

Exhibit 1: State Safety Oversight Community Map

 

Rail transit agencies in the SSO program provide three modes of service:

  • Heavy Rail: includes metros, subways, and rapid rail; usually has multiple-car trains on fixed, exclusive rights-of-way; and often uses sophisticated signaling systems.
  • Light Rail: includes lightweight passenger rail cars traveling singly or in short two-car trains on a fixed right-of-way, usually not separated from on-street traffic for much of the way. Trains are usually electrically powered.
  • Other Rail: includes automated guideway/monorail systems, inclined planes or funicular systems, and cable car systems.

Exhibit 2 identifies the SSO agencies and rail transit agencies affected by 49 CFR Part 659 in 2005

Exhibit 2: State Safety Oversight Community, 2005

Region State State Oversight Agency Rail Transit Agency Modes of Service
1 MA Massachusetts Dept .of Tele. and Energy Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Heavy Rail, Light Rail
2 NJ New Jersey Department of Transportation New Jersey Transit – Newark City Subway Light Rail
2 NJ New Jersey Department of Transportation New Jersey Transit – Hudson-Bergen Light Rail
2 NJ New Jersey Department of Transportation New Jersey Transit – River Line Light Rail
2 NJ New Jersey Department of Transportation Port Authority Transit Corporation Heavy Rail
2 NY New York Public Trans. Safety Board New York City Transit Heavy Rail
2 NY New York Public Trans. Safety Board Niagara Frontier Transit Authority Light Rail
3 DC/VA/MD Tri-State Oversight Committee Washington Metro. Area Transit Authority Heavy Rail
3 MD Maryland Department of Transportation Maryland Transit Administration Heavy Rail, Light Rail
3 PA Penn. Department of Transportation Southeastern Pennsylvania Transit Authority Heavy Rail, Light Rail
3 PA Penn. Department of Transportation Port Authority of Allegheny County Light Rail, Inclined Plane
3 PA Penn. Department of Transportation Cambria County Transit Authority Inclined Plane
4 FL Florida Department of Transportation Metro-Dade Transit Authority Heavy Rail, Auto. Guideway
4 FL Florida Department of Transportation Jacksonville Transportation Authority Automated Guideway
4 FL Florida Department of Transportation Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Light Rail
4 GA Georgia Department of Transportation Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority Heavy Rail
4 NC North Carolina Dept. of Transportation Charlotte Area Transit System – Trolley Line Light Rail
4 PR Puerto Rico State Emer. & Dis. Mgmt. Agency Tren Urbano Heavy Rail
4 TN Tennessee Department of Transportation Chattanooga Area Rapid Transit Authority Inclined Plan
4 TN Tennessee Department of Transportation Memphis Area Transit Authority Light Rail
5 IL Regional Transportation Authority Chicago Transit Authority Heavy Rail
5 MI Michigan Department of Transportation Detroit People Mover Automated Guideway
5 MN Minnesota Dept. of Public Safety/State Patrol Hiawatha Metro Transit Light Rail
5 OH Ohio Department of Transportation Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority Heavy Rail, Light Rail
5 WI Wisconsin Department of Transportation Kenosha Transit Light Rail
6 AR Arkansas State Highway and Trans. Dept. Little Rock River Rail Light Rail
6 LA Louisiana Department of Trans. and Devel. New Orleans Regional Transit Authority Light Rail
6 TX Texas Department of Transportation Galveston Island Transit Light Rail
6 TX Texas Department of Transportation Dallas Area Rapid Transit Light Rail
6 TX Texas Department of Transportation Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County Light Rail
7 IL St. Clair County Transit District Bi-State Development Agency(St Louis Metro) Light Rail
7 MO Missouri Department of Transportation Bi-State Development Agency(St Louis Metro) Light Rail
8 CO Colorado Public Utilities Commission Denver Regional Transit District Light Rail
8 UT Utah Department of Transportation Utah Transit Authority Light Rail
9 CA California Public Utilities Commission Bay Area Rapid Transit Heavy Rail
9 CA California Public Utilities Commission Los Angeles County Metro. Trans. Authority Heavy Rail, Light Rail
9 CA California Public Utilities Commission San Francisco Municipal Railway Light Rail, Cable Cars
9 CA California Public Utilities Commission San Diego Trolley, Inc. Light Rail
9 CA California Public Utilities Commission Sacramento Regional Transit District Light Rail
9 CA California Public Utilities Commission Santa Clara Valley Transit Authority Light Rail
10 OR Oregon Department of Transportation Portland Tri-Met Light Rail
10 OR Oregon Department of Transportation Portland Streetcar Light Rail
10 WA Washington State Department of Trans. Seattle Center Monorail Automated Guideway
10 WA Washington State Department of Trans. Sound Transit – Tacoma Link Light Rail

 

Reporting Thresholds

For Calendar Year 2005, SSO agencies used the accident thresholds established in the original 49 CFR Part 659:

Any event involving the revenue service operation of a rail fixed guideway system if as a result:
1. an individual dies;
2. an individual suffers bodily injury and immediately receives medical treatment away from the scene of the accident;
3. a collision, derailment, or fire causes property damage in excess of $100,000.

For each event meeting the above-listed thresholds in 2005, the rail transit agency notified the SSO agency. The SSO agency then either conducted an independent accident investigation, or authorized the rail transit agency to conduct the investigation on its behalf.

Each investigation resulted in report, which was adopted by the SSO agency. This report, at a minimum, provided a description of investigation activities, identified causal and contributing factors for the accident, and included a corrective action plan, to be implemented by the rail transit agency to prevent accident recurrence. Each corrective action plan was reviewed and approved by the SSO agency, and its implementation monitored by the SSO agency.

Beginning in Calendar Year 2006, FTA’s annual reporting thresholds will change to reflect the revised SSO rule (Part 659.33). These new thresholds include any event that results in the following:

  • A fatality at the scene; or where an individual is confirmed dead within thirty (30) days of a rail transit-related incident;
  • Injuries requiring immediate medical attention away from the scene for two or more individuals;
  • Property damage to rail transit vehicles, non-rail transit vehicles, other rail transit property or facilities and non-transit property that equals or exceeds $25,000;
  • An evacuation due to life safety reasons;
  • A collision at a grade crossing;
  • A main-line derailment;
  • A collision with an individual on a rail right of way; or
  • A collision between a rail transit vehicle and a second rail transit vehicle, or a rail transit non-revenue vehicle.

These new thresholds are more closely aligned with information reported by rail transit agencies to the National Transit Database (NTD), Safety and Security Incident Reporting Module. In its revised final rule for 49 CFR Part 659, FTA adopted the new thresholds with the intention of conforming the two reporting systems to: reduce reporting burdens; provide SSO agencies with access to NTD reports to supplement their oversight activity; and provide for independent SSO agency verification of NTD data.

Standardization

To interpret data reported for 2005 and to establish trends and rates, FTA uses traditional measures of transportation service, including unlinked passenger trips, vehicle revenue miles, vehicle revenue hours, and passenger miles.

  • Unlinked Passenger Trips: The number of passengers who board public transportation vehicles. Passengers are counted each time they board vehicles no matter how many vehicles they use to travel from their origin to their destination.
  • Vehicle Revenue Miles: The miles that vehicles are scheduled to or actually travel while in revenue service. Vehicle revenue miles include layover and recovery time, but exclude deadhead, operator training, vehicle maintenance testing, and charter services.
  • Vehicle Revenue Hours: The hours that vehicles are scheduled to or actually travel while in revenue service. Vehicle revenue hours include layover and recovery time, but exclude deadhead, operator training, vehicle maintenance testing, and charter services.
  • Passenger Miles: The cumulative sum of the distances ridden by each passenger.

For 2005, as depicted in Exhibit 3, the 26 SSO agencies reported the following service information for the 44 rail transit agencies in the SSO program. In each category of service, rail transit agencies have experienced considerable growth over the last decade.

Exhibit 3: Rail Transit Industry Service Information, 2005

Mode Unlinked Passenger Trips Vehicle Revenue Miles Vehicle Revenue Hours Passenger Miles
Heavy Rail 2,733,224,881 613,314,552 30,537,691 14,072,194,057
Light Rail 385,936,736 69,122,037 4,628,750 1,703,925,387
Other Rail 21,540,746 2,290,519 316,036 21,684,236
Total 3,140,702,363 684,727,108 35,482,477 15,797,803,680

In 2005, rail transit agencies under the State Safety Oversight Program reported over 3.1 billion unlinked passenger trips. This level of ridership marks an increase of over 300 million annual passenger trips since 1999. Also, since 1999, there has also been a steady increase in the number of:

  • Annual Vehicle Revenue Miles provided by the industry – from just over 625 million to almost 685 million;
  • Annual Vehicle Revenue Hours provided by industry – from 32 million to over 35 million; and
  • Annual Passenger Miles provided by industry -- from just over 14 billion to just under 16 billion.

SSO Reportable Accidents

For FTA’s annual report, accidents are grouped into four categories:

  • Collisions,
  • Derailments,
  • Fires, and
  • Other (including suicides, slips and falls, passenger actions, and trespassing-related and other security incidents.)

Exhibit 4 presents the impacts of FTA-reportable accidents between 2003 and 2005 in terms of fatalities and injuries.

Exhibit 4: FTA-Reportable Accidents and Impacts, 2003 - 2005

Category 2003 Fatalities 2003 Injuries 2004 Fatalities 2004 Injuries 2005 Fatalities 2005 Injuries Total Fatal ties Total Injuries
Derailments 0 7 0 5 0 11 0 23
Fires 0 188 0 15 0 41 0 244
Collisions 13 219 12 260 13 272 38 751
Non-Grade Crossing 4 116 1 166 9 134 14 416
Grade Crossing 9 103 11 94 4 138 24 335
Other 86 2,659 99 3,680 58 3,192 243 9,531
Totals 99 3,073 111 3,960 71 3,516 281 10,549

Between 2003 and 2005, SSO agencies reported that the rail transit agencies in their jurisdictions experienced:

  • 476 collisions, resulting in 38 fatalities and 751 injuries;
  • 69 derailments and fires, resulting in 267 injuries and 0 fatalities; and
  • 9,687 “other” accidents, resulting in 9,531 injuries and 243 fatalities.

“Other” accidents include a range of events such as accidents on escalators, elevators and stairs; slips, trips and falls in stations; injuries boarding and deboarding rail cars; car door injuries; and injuries resulting from sudden train starts and stops. Certain types of employee accidents and accidents involving non-passengers also fall into the “other” category.

Three-Year Accident Trends

When standardized by unlinked passenger trips, the rates of occurrence for collisions, derailments and fires, and other accidents between 2003 and 2005 are depicted in Exhibit 5. In spite of the growing number of rail transit agencies in the SSO program between 2003 and 2005, this exhibit shows decreasing trend rates for collisions, derailment and fires. Rates for “other” accidents varied considerably over the three-year period, reaching an all-time high of 12.29 accidents per 10 million passenger trips in 2004.

Exhibit 5: Rail Transit Accident Rates per 10 Million Passenger Trips, 2003 - 2005

  • In spite of a growing number of rail transit systems, the total number of reported collisions decreased each year between 2003 and 2005.
  • Derailments and fires also trended down over the three-year period.
  • The rate of “other” accidents saw-toothed between 2003 and 2005.

Modal Considerations

Exhibits 6 through 8 depict categories of reportable accidents and impacts by mode.

Exhibit 6: Heavy Rail – FTA-Reportable Accident Impacts, 2003 – 2005

Category Collisions Derailments Fires Other Total
Year Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat.
2003 14 10 4 11 0 0 14 188 0 2,479 2,418 79 2,518 2,616 83
2004 9 26 1 9 3 0 5 7 0 3,314 3,286 85 3,337 3,322 86
2005 15 13 2 2 3 0 3 38 0 2,780 2,740 46 2,800 2,794 48
Total 38 49 7 22 6 0 22 233 0 8,753 8,444 210 8,655 8,732 217

 

Exhibit 7: Light Rail – FTA-Reportable Accident Impacts, 2003 – 2005

Category Collisions Derailments Fires Other Total
Year Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat.
2003 155 209 9 13 7 0 2 0 0 239 2231 7 409 447 16
2004 148 234 11 3 2 0 0 0 0 394 381 13 545 617 24
2005 133 258 11 5 8 0 1 3 0 456 447 9 595 716 20
Total 436 701 31 21 17 0 3 3 0 1,089 1,059 29 1,549 1,780 60

 

Exhibit 8: Other Rail – FTA-Reportable Accident Impacts, 2003 – 2005

Category Collisions Derailments Fires Other Total
Year Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat.
2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 10 0 1 10 0
2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8 0 16 13 1 17 21 1
2005 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 5 3 10 6 3
Total 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 0 25 28 4 28 37 4

 

When broken down over the three year period between 2003 and 2005:

  • The 13 heavy rail service providers affected by 49 CFR Part 659 accounted for 88 percent of passenger trips taken on rail transit and experienced 8,655 total accidents, which resulted in 217 fatalities and 8,732 injuries.
  • The 33 light rail service providers affected by 49 CFR Part 659 accounted for 11 percent of passenger trips and experienced 1,549 total accidents, which resulted in 60 fatalities and 1,780 injuries.
  • The nine (9) other rail service providers accounted for one (1) percent of passenger trips taken on rail transit and experienced 28 total accidents, which resulted in four (4) fatalities and 37 injuries.

When the data provided by the SSO agencies regarding the total number of accidents, fatalities and injuries are standardized, by mode, using unlinked passenger trips, the following rates result, depicted in Exhibit 9:

Exhibit 9: Rates per 10 Million Passenger Trips, 2003 – 2005

Category Accident Rate Fatality Rate Injury Rate
Year Heavy Rail. Light Rail Other Rail Heavy Rail Light Rail Other Rail Heavy Rail Light Rail Other Rail
2003 9.69 13.13 0.53 0.32 0.51 0.00 10.07 14.35 5.28
2004 12.51 15.84 9.04 0.32 0.70 0.53 12.45 17.94 11.17
2005 10.24 15.42 4.64 0.18 0.52 1.39 10.22 18.55 2.79

 

Exhibit 9 demonstrates that heavy rail agencies, in spite of the large number of passengers carried, maintain accident, fatality and injury rates significantly below the rates experienced by light rail agencies. “Other” rail transit agencies experience the lowest accident and injury rates of all modes reporting to FTA’s SSO program, with fatality rates in this mode varying from lowest to highest in comparison to light rail and heavy rail agencies over the three year period.

Collectively, these rates for rail transit compare quite favorably to other modes of transportation, and show not only that rail transit provides a convenient and attractive alternative to traveling by automobile, but also that it is far safer. For example, when compared to accident, fatality and injury rates established by the National Safety Council, in their 2005-2006 Injury Facts, passengers on rail transit systems, on average, are 40 times less likely to be involved in a fatality accident, and 20 times less likely to be involved in an accident resulting in injury. Likewise, the NTSB in its Annual Safety Report for 2005, shows that of the 45,650 fatalities attributed to transportation in 2005, rail transit, with less than 75 fatalities, is responsible for only .15 percent of the total.

However, as indicated in Exhibit 10, there is great variability in rail transit accident, fatality and injury rates. Significant accidents continue to occur, and, when they do, the corresponding rates for accidents, injuries and fatalities fluctuate considerably by mode.

 

Exhibit 10: Trended Rates per 10 Million Passenger Trips by Mode, 2003 – 2005

 

As indicated in Exhibit 10, between 2003 and 2005, the accident rate increased by 5 percent for heavy rail transit agencies and 17 percent for light rail agencies. The accident rate ranged dramatically for the other rail transit agencies, from .53 at its lowest to 9.04 at its highest. Between 2003 and 2005, the fatality rate decreased by 43 percent for the heavy rail agencies affected by Part 659; remained relatively stable for the light rail agencies affected by Part 659; and increased sharply for the other rail transit agencies affected by Part 659. Finally, between 2003 and 2005, the injury rate remained stable for the heavy rail agencies; increased by 30 percent for the light rail agencies, and decreased by 89 percent for the other rail transit agencies affected by Part 659.

The challenge for rail transit is to stabilize these low rates and to work to further reduce fatalities and injuries even as the total number of people using transit increases.

Probable Cause

For the past three years, FTA has required SSO agencies to submit probable cause data for each reportable accident. FTA has established a list of standard probable causes for collisions, derailments, and fires, as well as a separate set of categories for “other” accidents. SSO agencies use these pre-defined causes to assign a probable cause to reported accidents.

Established probable causes are listed below.

Probable causes for collisions, derailments and fires:

  • Car Equipment Failure
    • Car Body
    • Propulsion Unit
    • Trucks
  • Human Failure
    • Operating Rule Violation
    • Operating Procedures
    • Violations
    • Drug/Alcohol Violation
    • Fatigue
    • Inattentiveness
    • Employee Action
  • Operations
    • Crowd Control
    • Improper Procedures
  • Track
    • Track Component Deficiency
    • Track Component Failure
  • Signal
    • Signal Component Deficiency
    • Signal Component Failure
  • Cable
    • Cable Component Deficiency
    • Cable Component Failure
  • Actions of Other Vehicle
  • Actions of Passengers/Station Occupants
  • Actions of Pedestrians

Probable causes for "other" accidents::

  • Suicides
  • Suicide Attempts
  • Slips, Trips and Falls in Station
  • Boarding/Deboarding
  • Car Door
  • Escalators
  • Elevator
  • Homicides
  • Assaults
  • Trespassing
  • Health-related
  • Material Falling from Structure or Train
  • Non-Passenger Incidents
  • Equipment/Maintenance
  • Sudden Train Movement
  • Unknown

Results

Between 2003 and 2005, 10,232 accidents were reported meeting Part 659 thresholds. Exhibit 11 provides a detailed break-down of reported probable cause for the 10,232 reported accidents by year. Over the three year period, these accidents resulted in 281 fatalities and 10,549 injuries. Exhibit 12 shows the probable causes identified for reportable accidents, fatalities and injuries between 2003 and 2005.

Appendix A provides additional detail on probable causes for fatalities and injuries for all reporting agencies, broken down by heavy rail and light rail modes. Appendix B provides analysis on probable causes by the types of accident reported, by year, and by rail transit mode.

Exhibit 11: Probable Causes of Accidents, 2003 – 2005

Probable Cause 2003 2004 2005 Total
Car Equipment Failure
Car Body 0 0 0 0
Propulsion Unit 3 1 1 5
Trucks 6 6 1 13
Human Failure
Operating Rule Violation 10 19 14 43
Operating Procedures Violation 6 2 10 18
Drug/Alcohol Violation 0 0 0 0
Fatigue 0 1 0 1
Inattentiveness 30 11 9 50
Employee Action 4 1 4 9
Operations
Crowd Control 0 1 0 1
Improper Procedures 3 2 0 5
Track Component Deficiencies and/or Failures 4 5 1 10
Signal Component Deficiencies and/or Failures 1 2 1 4
Cable Component Deficiencies and/or Failures 3 2 0 5
Actions of Passenger/Station Occupants 449 597 528 1,574
Actions of Other Vehicles 98 77 63 238
Actions of Pedestrians 36 37 49 122
Other
Suicides 43 48 19 110
Suicide Attempts 22 29 49 100
Slips, Trips and Falls 1,696 1,951 2,014 5,661
Boarding/Deboarding 46 59 73 178
Car Door 46 96 69 211
Escalators 201 181 101 483
Homicides 1 2 2 5
Assaults 8 432 298 738
Trespassing 31 220 26 277
Health-related 95 4 6 105
Material from Structure or Train Striking a Passenger 3 6 5 14
Non-Passenger Incidents 50 60 8 118
Train Movement 7 13 18 30
Elevator 9 5 16 30
Equipment/Maintenance 4 8 0 12
Unknown 13 21 20 54
Totals 2,928 3,899 3,405 10,232

 

Exhibit 12: Probable Causes of Accidents, Fatalities and Injuries, 2003 – 2005

Accidents Fatalities Injuries
Probable Cause Number Percentage Number Percentage Number Percentage
Slip, Trips and Falls 5,561 55.33% 13 4.63% 5,702 54.05%
Actions of Passengers/Station Occupants 1,574 15.38% 58 20.64% 1,555 14.74%
Assaults 738 7.21% 0 0.00% 739 7.01%
Escalators/Elevators 513 5.01% 2 0.71% 511 4.84%
Boarding/Alighting (including car door incidents) 389 3.80% 2 0.71% 393 3.73%
Trespassing 277 2.71% 37 13.17% 237 2.25%
Actions of Other Vehicle 238 2.33% 12 4.27% 376 3.56%
Actions of Other Pedestrian 122 1.19% 18 6.41% 103 0.98%
Non-Passenger Incidents 118 1.15% 8 2.85% 108 1.02%
Human Factors/Human Failure 127 1.24% 6 2.14% 272 2.58%
Suicides 110 1.08% 110 39.15% 0 0.00%
Health-related 105 1.03% 9 3.20% 96 0.91%
Suicide Attempts 100 0.98% 0 0.00% 75 0.71%
Sudden Train Movement 38 0.37% 0 0.00% 47 0.45%
Debris Hitting Passengers from Structure or Train 14 0.14% 1 0.36% 16 0.15%
Equipment Failure (including equipment/maintenance issues and component deficiencies and/or failures in track, cable, signals and car equipment) 49 0.48% 0 0.00% 218 2.07%
Homicides 5 0.05% 5 1.78% 0 0.00%
Unknown 54 0.53% 0 0.00% 101 0.96%
Totals 10,232 100% 281 100% 10,549 100%

The data presented in Exhibits 11 and 12 reflect the reality that the majority of accidents reported by rail transit agencies in the SSO program occur at heavy rail transit agencies (84.6 percent). As such, suicides and suicide attempts; the actions of careless or intoxicated passengers and station occupants; slips, trips and falls in passenger stations; escalator/elevator misuse, malfunction or over-crowding; crowding/carelessness and door malfunctions while boarding/alighting rail vehicles, and employee safety issues caused the majority of fatalities and injuries reported in the SSO program between 2003 and 2005.

Light rail agencies account for 15.1 percent of all accidents reported in the SSO program. These agencies experience significant issues with the actions of other vehicles, the actions of pedestrians and trespassers, and human factors/human failures, including rule violations and inattentiveness. Light rail agencies are also experiencing an increasing number of slips, trips and falls.

Other rail transit agencies account for 0.3 percent of all accidents reported in the SSO program between 2003 and 2005. Other rail transit agencies experience their biggest safety concerns from the actions of other vehicles, equipment failures, and human factors/human failures in system operation.

Safety Priorities for SSO Community

Based on the information presented in Exhibits 11 and 12, the probable causes of accidents with the most serious consequences in terms of the number of fatalities and injuries include:

  • Passenger Safety in and near Rail Transit Stations
    • Actions of Passenger/Station Occupants – 58 fatalities and 1,555 injuries
    • Slips, Trips and Falls – 13 fatalities and 5,702 injuries
    • Escalators/Elevators – 2 fatalities and 511 injuries
  • Collisions
    • Trespassing – 37 fatalities and 237 injuries
    • Actions of Other Vehicles – 12 fatalities and 376 injuries
    • Actions of Pedestrians – 18 fatalities and 103 injuries
  • Rules/Procedures Compliance and Managing Fatigue
    • Human Factors/Human Failures – 6 fatalities and 272 injuries
    • Equipment Failure – 218 injuries
  • Passenger Safety on Rail Transit Vehicles
    • Boarding/Alighting – 2 fatalities and 393 injuries
    • Sudden Train Movement – 47 injuries
  • Transit Worker Safety
    • Non-Passenger Incidents – 8 fatalities and 108 injuries

This listing excludes suicides (110 fatalities), suicide attempts (100 injuries), homicides (5 fatalities), assaults (739 injuries), and health-related events (9 fatalities and 96 injuries). These events are typically managed through rail transit security programs and public wellness campaigns.

Addressing the Priorities

To support SSO agencies and rail transit agencies in managing and preventing, where possible, these accidents and their consequences, FTA has initiatives underway in the following areas:

  • Passenger Safety in Stations and on Vehicles
  • Collision Reduction
  • Rules/Procedures Compliance and Fatigue Management
  • Transit Worker Safety

Each of these initiatives is discussed briefly below.

Passenger Safety in Stations and on Vehicles

As specified in FTA’s revised Part 659.31, a revamped process has been created to ensure an on-going role for SSO agencies in the rail transit agency’s identification and resolution of operating hazards. As explained in the preamble to the revised rule, FTA anticipates that this process will be used to review and support the rail transit agency’s activity to ensure passenger safety in and near stations and while boarding and deboarding vehicles.

FTA’s hazard management process specifies that the oversight agency “must require the rail transit agency to develop and document in its system safety program plan a process to identify and resolve hazards during its operation, including any hazards resulting from subsequent system extensions or modifications, operational changes, or other changes within the rail transit environment.”

As required in 49 CFR Part 659.31 (b), at a minimum, this process must:

  • Define the rail transit agency’s approach to hazard management and the implementation of an integrated system-wide hazard resolution process;
  • Specify the sources of, and the mechanisms to support, the on-going identification of hazards;
  • Define the process by which identified hazards will be evaluated and prioritized for elimination or control;
  • Identify the mechanism used to track through resolution the identified hazard(s);
  • Define minimum thresholds for the notification and reporting of hazard(s) to oversight agencies; and
  • Specify the process by which the rail transit agency will provide on-going reporting of hazard resolution activities to the oversight agency.

Based on the analysis from FTA’s 2005 SSO Annual Report, probable causes for accidents reported by light and heavy rail agencies indicate that, when suicides are excluded, the majority of fatalities and injuries reported to the program result from the types of accidents that are largely addressed through the rail transit agency hazard management process.

Through its SSO Audit Program and new guidance and training being developed, FTA will continue to work with SSO agencies and rail transit agencies in overseeing the hazard management process to support prevention of these types of accidents. Also, FTA is in the process of modifying its highly successful “TransitWatch” program to include additional activities to support the safety and security of passengers in transit stations. TransitWatch is a safety and security awareness program designed to encourage the active participation of transit passengers and employees in maintaining a safe transit environment. Information on the TransitWatch Program is available at:

http://transit-safety.volpe.dot.gov/security/TransitWatch/

During this initiative, FTA will evaluate how program materials and recommended practices can be modified to better identify and manage not only security issues, but also risky behavior by passengers on escalators and elevators, on stairwells, boarding and deboarding trains, leaning into trains, and safely navigating rail car doors. Additional activities will focus on developing versions of TransitWatch materials in other languages and to support passengers with disabilities. Additional FTA initiatives will focus on housekeeping issues and new designs for trash cans, to ensure the cleanliness of transit stations and to remove tripping hazards.

Collision Reduction

To support reductions in collisions, FTA will continue to sponsor research to coordinate with Federal and non-profit agencies and to support the development of standards and recommended practices for use in the rail transit industry and particularly by light rail transit (LRT) agencies.

Research: FTA sponsors an extensive program of research conducted by the Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) devoted to the reduction of light rail collisions. To date, FTA has funded three major studies and one research digest:

  • TCRP Project D-10 Audible Signals for Pedestrian Safety in Light Rail Transit Environments – This research has resulted in a guidebook on the use of audible signals and related operating procedures for pedestrian-crossing safety in a light rail transit environment. The research addresses (1) integration of these audible devices with other crossing measures (e.g., signage, channelization, warning and control devices) to maximize safety; (2) pedestrian crossings in various environments (e.g., low-speed street running, at highway-rail grade crossings in semi-exclusive rights-of-way, and at stations); (3) on-vehicle and wayside audible signals; and (4) the needs of disabled individuals. More information is available at: .
  • TCRP Report 17: Integration of Light Rail Transit into City Streets documents and presents the results of a study to improve the safety of light rail transit (LRT) operations in shared rights-of-way where LRT operates on, adjacent to, or across city streets at low to moderate speeds (35 mph or less). Published in December 1996, the Final Report is available at: .
  • TCRP Report 69: Light Rail Service: Pedestrian and Vehicular Safety documents and presents the results of a study to improve the safety of light rail transit (LRT) in semi-exclusive rights-of-way where light rail vehicles (LRVs) operate at speeds greater than 35 mph through crossings with streets and pedestrians pathways. This report also presents the results of #eld tests conducted to improve the safety of higher speed LRT systems through grade crossing design. Published in February 2000, the Final Report is available at: .
  • TCRP Research Results Digest 51, Second Train Coming Warning Sign: Demonstration Projects summarizes the results of demonstration projects in Maryland and California concerning second-train-coming warning signs for light rail transit systems. Published in December 2002, this Digest is available at: .

TCRP, through FTA sponsorship, has just initiated another research project, entitled TCRP Project A-30: Improving Safety Where Light Rail, Pedestrians, and Vehicles Intersect. In this project, FTA is sponsoring this work to build on previous research evaluating safety deficiencies for light rail, at-grade alignments. This research will update and improve upon these past studies by focusing on four sub-areas: compiling data, updating previous studies, analyzing the effectiveness of past practices, and analyzing possible safety enhancements due to technology advancements. To facilitate the compilation of crash figures for this research, a standard form will be developed to enable transit agencies across the country to report comparable at-grade crossing crash data both within and across cities. At a minimum, collision data will include alignment type; type of traffic control devices; train speed; motor vehicle speed (both posted and actual); roadway average daily traffic, roadway and tract geometry; and collision location, time, and date.

FTA is also sponsoring a research project, conducted by Oklahoma State University, to ensure that the results of research regarding effective practices are conveyed to the LRT systems in a manner that ensures their implementation. This project, which will conduct before-and-after studies with light rail agencies around the country, will result in a Best Practices Manual and training program, providing “one stop shopping” for those transit personnel planning, designing, and operating light rail systems. This study will also address new practices, new traffic engineering treatments, and new technologies which may have impacts on system safety. For example, Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) technology now offer the capabilities both to provide signal preemption for light rail transit vehicles and to integrate light rail transit automatic vehicle location systems with traffic signals to reduce queuing in the vicinity of the tracks ahead of light rail transit vehicle arrival.

Coordination: FTA also has forged a partnership with Operation Lifesaver (OLI) to address light rail safety public education and outreach and also to support coordination with driver education training program in States around the country. Since 2004, OLI has been testing program materials for public marketing, education, and communications efforts at seven (7) light rail transit agencies across the country. These materials, which are now available to all LRT systems, free of charge, have been designed to meet specific light rail transit system needs. More information on this program is available at:

http://www.oli.org/
.

 

FTA continues its partnership with the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Highway-Rail Grade Crossing and Trespasser Prevention Division, supporting research, action plans, and safety data analysis. Additional information is available at:

http://www.fra.dot.gov
.

 

Standards and Recommended Practices: FTA has also worked closely with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), ensuring that recommendations from the TCRP research and light rail transit system experience are addressed in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). As a result, many of the traffic control devices and engineering treatments recommended in the TCRP 17 and 69 reports have subsequently been incorporated into MUTCD Part 10 - Traffic Controls for Highway-Light Rail Transit Grade Crossings, which is available at:

http://mutcd.fhwa.dot.gov/
.

 

The MUTCD contains standards for traffic control devices that regulate, warn, and guide road users along the highways and byways in all 50 States. FHWA provides interpretations of MUTCD standards and also offers a Peer-to-Peer Program for Traffic Control Devices (P2P TCD), which provides public agencies with short-term assistance to address specific, technical issues on traffic control devices at no cost to the user. FTA will continue to work with FHWA to support subsequent updates to the MUTCD, and to ensure the use of MUTCD standards in new rail transit projects through on-site assistance and monitoring provided by FTA’s Project Management Oversight (PMO) Program.

The American Public Transportation Association (APTA) with FTA partnership and funding, has developed a set of standards and recommended practices for rail grade crossing inspections, maintenance, public education and trespass prevention, and rail grade crossing safety assessment and warning systems, including the following:

  • RT-S-RGC-001-02, Standard for Rail Transit System Highway-Rail Grade Crossing Inspection and Maintenance
  • RT-RP-RGC-002-02, Recommended Practice for Rail Transit Grade Crossing Public Education and Rail Trespass Prevention
  • RT-RP-RGC-003-03, Recommended Practice for Rail Grade Crossing Safety Assessment
  • RT-S-RGC-004-03, Standard for Rail Transit Grade Crossing Warning Systems

More information on these materials is available at:

http://www.apta.com
.

 

In addition to this work, FTA is also sponsoring research and standards development initiatives to reduce the impact of those collisions that do occur. In recent years, FTA, in sponsoring TCRP Project G-4 and TCRP Project C-17, has supported the development of vehicle standards in partnership with APTA, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Rail Transit Vehicle Interface Standards Committee, and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Standards Committee for Rail Transit Vehicles (RT). Additional information is available on these committees at:

The ASME RT Committee is currently developing crashworthiness standards for both light rail and heavy rail vehicles. These standards, which should provide greater protection for passengers, lower the cost of transit railcars and replacement parts, reduce parts inventories, and simplify maintenance, are developed through a consensus-building process. More than 300 individuals representing transit agencies, manufacturers, suppliers, government agencies, and others have been involved in the process, representing significant in-kind contributions by the transit industry. Draft versions of the crashworthiness standards for light and heavy rail vehicles should be available by the end of 2006.

The IEEE, Rail Transit Vehicle Interface Standards Committee, under FTA sponsorship, developed eight standards that were formally approved and published by the IEEE:

  • a standard for rail transit vehicle passenger information systems;
  • a standard for the functioning of and interfaces among propulsion, friction brake, and train-borne master control on rail rapid transit vehicles;
  • a standard for communications protocols aboard trains;
  • a standard for rail transit vehicle event recorders;
  • a standard for communications-based train control performance and functional requirements;
  • a standard for auxiliary power system interfaces;
  • environmental standards for rail transit vehicles; and
  • a standard for verification of vital functions in processor-based systems used in rail transit control.

A number of other draft standards are in various levels of development by the IEEE, Rail Transit Vehicle Interface Standards Committee Working Groups. FTA’s PMO program works with rail transit projects undertaking vehicle acquisitions or train control upgrades to address the consideration of these standards in their projects.

Rules/Procedures Compliance and Fatigue Management

In FTA’s recent revision of 49 CFR Part 659 (State Safety Oversight Rule), FTA required that each rail transit agency address compliance with operating rules and procedures in its System Safety Program Plan (SSPP) and supporting safety program.

 

49 CFR Part 659.19 (m) requires in the SSPP “a description of the process used by the rail transit agency to develop, maintain, and ensure compliance with rules and procedures having a safety impact, including:

  1. Identification of operating and maintenance rules and procedures subject to review;
  2. Techniques used to assess the implementation of operating and maintenance rules and procedures by employees, such as performance testing;
  3. Techniques used to assess the effectiveness of supervision relating to the implementation of operating and maintenance rules; and
  4. Process for documenting results and incorporating them into the hazard management program.”

This process must be reviewed and approved by the SSO agency, and audited on-site at the rail transit agency no less than once every three years through the rail transit agency’s internal safety audit process and through the SSO agency’s three-year safety review process.

To support implementation of this requirement, FTA has provided technical assistance to both rail transit agencies and SSO agencies during annual meetings and workshops, and through training programs offered by the Transportation Safety Institute. In 2007, FTA will establish a “Rules Compliance Working Group” to develop a recommended practice for implementation by the rail transit industry. FTA will also provide training to SSO program managers during annual invitational workshops.

Fatigue Management

In 1995, NTSB identified fatigue as a primary cause of a New York City Transit fatal accident on the Williamsburg Bridge. NTSB also found fatigue-related causes for two light rail accidents at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. As a result, the NTSB recommended, and Congress directed, FTA to conduct a continuing program of technical assistance and training in fatigue awareness for transit operators. Major activities performed by FTA to date include:

  • Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 81: Toolbox for Transit Operator Fatigue: This report, which was published in 2002, offers a variety of resources, methods and techniques to deal with operator fatigue. A primary goal of the toolbox is to provide a structured process for implementing a fatigue management program (FMP) that incorporates appropriate tools. Some specific tools are geared to the individual operator while others are for use by supervisors and managers involved in aspects of daily service planning and delivery. This report is available at:
  • National Transit Institute (NTI) Workshops: In 2002 and 2003, NTI conducted a series of nine (9) regional workshops on fatigue awareness for transit operators. The highlight of the workshops was the National Rollout of TCRP Report 81: Toolbox for Transit Operator Fatigue. These workshops also included discussion regarding the TCRP report’s “how to” component on the design, implementation, and evaluation of fatigue-mitigation plans. The fatigue-mitigation plans may be used by senior managers, operations managers, safety officials, medical personnel, risk managers, human resource personnel, policymakers, and legal advisers. Model materials and discussions of challenges and opportunities were also provided.
  • NTI Training Course -- Toolbox for Transit Operator Fatigue: Putting the Report Into Action: NTI currently offers a training course on fatigue management which builds on the lessons learned from the Workshops. The next scheduled offering is in Anaheim, California in May 2006.
  • Transportation Safety Institute (TSI) -- Fatigue Awareness Training Program: TSI developed and offers a training program for the transit industry that consists of three (3) fatigue seminars which are audience-specific and an instructor’s course. The three seminars (Fatigue Awareness for Employees Seminar, Fatigue Awareness for Supervisors Seminar, and Fatigue Awareness for Managers Seminar) and the instructor’s course are conducted over two consecutive days. These seminars highlight current research data on fatigue and sleep deprivation, and their relation to human performance factors in the transit workplace. The seminars focus on the symbiotic roles that the employees, their families, employers, and the environment play in contributing to fatigue. The physiological and psychological aspects of fatigue are also discussed. The last offering of these seminars was in Tampa, Florida in January 2006.
  • U.S. Department of Transportation Fatigue Resource Directory: This directory was originally compiled in conjunction with the NASA/NTSB Symposium on Managing Fatigue in Transportation: Promoting Safety and Productivity and is now maintained by the Department of Transportation. The purpose of this Fatigue Resource Directory (FReDi) is to provide transportation-industry members with current, accessible information on resources available to address fatigue in transportation. The directory is available at:

FTA is now working with rail transit agencies and SSO agencies to address a new recommendation issued by NTSB as a result of a collision between two WMATA trains at the Woodley Park-Zoo/Adams Morgan Station on November 3, 2004. This recommendation, which was issued on March 23, 2006, requires FTA to: “Require transit agencies, through the system safety program and hazard management process if necessary, to ensure that the time off between daily tours of duty including regular and overtime assignments, allows train operators to obtain at least 8 hours of uninterrupted sleep.” FTA, in partnership with APTA, is also working to develop standards for fatigue management in the rail transit environment.

Transit Worker Safety

As a term of compliance with FTA grant programs, FTA requires construction safety programs and plans for all major capital projects. FTA’s PMO contractors conduct on-site assessments to review the rail transit project’s implementation of these requirements. New guidance being developed to address SAFETEA-LU requirements for Safety and Security Management Plans as part of the Project Management Plan provides additional recommendations for these programs. These guidelines will focus on ensuring the safety of contractors and transit employees working on construction projects and on ensuring that construction projects which impact existing rail transit operations have adequate safety protections in place.

In addition, in FTA’s revised rule, 49 CFR Part 659.19(r), FTA requires, as part of the SSPP, a “description of the safety program for employees and contractors that incorporates the applicable local, state, and federal requirements, including: Safety requirements that employees and contractors must follow when working on, or in close proximity to, rail transit agency property; and processes for ensuring the employees and contractors know and follow the requirements.”

This program must be reviewed and approved by the SSO agency, and audited on-site at the rail transit agency no less than once every three years through the rail transit agency’s internal safety audit process and through the SSO agency’s three-year safety review process.

FTA will also continue to address transit worker safety issues during annual meetings and workshops with rail transit agency and SSO agency personnel and through project construction and management training provided by the National Transit Institute and general rail transit safety training provided by the Transportation Safety Institute.

Top 10 Safety Action Items

In FTA’s Rail Transit Safety Action Plan, the results of analysis from the 2005 SSO Annual Report have been combined with the results of analysis from data reported by rail transit agencies to the National Transit Database (NTD) since 2002. Based on this analysis, FTA identified its Top 10 priorities for improving rail transit safety:

  • Priority Number 1: Reducing Collisions with Other Vehicles
  • Priority Number 2: Reducing Collisions with Pedestrians and Trespassers
  • Priority Number 3: Improving Compliance with Operating Rules
  • Priority Number 4: Reducing the Impacts of Fatigue on Transit Workers
  • Priority Number 5: Reducing Unsafe Acts by Passengers in Transit Stations
  • Priority Number 6: Improving Safety of Transit Workers
  • Priority Number 7: Improving Safety for Passengers with Disabilities
  • Priority Number 8: Removing Debris from Tracks and Stations
  • Priority Number 9: Improving Emergency Response Procedures
  • Priority Number 10: Improving Safety Data Acquisition and Analysis

The Top 10 priorities identified by FTA in the Rail Transit Safety Action Plan coincide with the results of the analysis presented in this 2005 Annual SSO Report. However, the ranking is somewhat different. Results from the 2005 Annual SSO Report indicate that “Reducing Unsafe Acts by Passengers in Transit Stations” is the most significant priority in terms of consequences to passengers, employees, and others who come into contact with the system. However, as explained in FTA’s Rail Transit Safety Action Plan, priorities and the rankings assigned by FTA are not based only on the numbers of fatalities and injuries, but also on the standardized rates per 10 million passenger trips.

From this perspective, modal distinctions are important. As demonstrated in Exhibit 10, collisions with vehicles, pedestrians and trespassers at rail grade crossings and intersections drive up accident, fatality and injury rates per 10 million passenger trips for light rail agencies. The rates for light rail agencies remain well above the corresponding rates for heavy rail agencies per 10 million passenger trips. In response to the disparity in rates between light rail and heavy rail, FTA made the reduction of these collisions its top priority. In this way, safety resources are focused on ensuring that rail transit passengers receive the same baseline of safety, whether traveling by subway, light rail, or automated guideway.

Improving compliance with operating rules and procedures and reducing the impact of fatigue on transit workers, activities exclusively under the control of the rail transit agency, are the next priorities, and are equally important for both heavy and light rail agencies. FTA then identified reducing unsafe acts by passengers in transit stations as the next priority, which primarily affects heavy rail agencies with stations, mezzanines and parking garages. FTA rounded out the Top 10 by focusing on transit worker safety, safety for passengers with disabilities, good housekeeping practices, improving emergency response, and enhancing safety data acquisition and analysis.

As demonstrated in Exhibit 13, FTA’s Rail Transit Safety Action Plan specifies certain FTA initiatives underway to address each of the Top 10 priorities. More information on each of these initiatives can be found in the Rail Transit Safety Action Plan.

Further, based on information obtained from the NTD, FTA’s Rail Transit Safety Action Plan established performance measures for rail transit agencies. These measures, which appear in Exhibit 14, encourage a 10 percent reduction in significant accident categories by 2008.

Finally, based on information provided in the 2005 Annual SSO Report, in the Rail Transit Safety Action Plan, FTA also identifies target goals for improvement in the SSO Program. Exhibit 15 identifies these goals.

Conclusion

For Calendar Year 2006, SSO agencies will be reporting to FTA using the new thresholds specified in the revised 49 CFR Part 659. These thresholds are more closely aligned with the NTD Major Safety and Security Incident Reporting thresholds and should ensure greater consistency in the data used by FTA to monitor how well the rail transit industry and SSO agencies are meeting FTA’s performance measures and target safety goals. FTA intends to fold all future reporting on the results from SSO Annual Reports into Annual Updates on the Rail Transit Safety Action Plan.

 

Exhibit 13: FTA's Safety Initiatives

Safety Initiatives:
Passenger Safety in and near Rail Transit Stations:
Action Item Status
Training session on addressing passenger safety in and near rail transit stations as part of the hazard management process To be included at the 2007 SSO Program Manager’s Meeting
TransitWatch initiative revised to address risky behavior 2007
TransitWatch initiative to address housekeeping 2007
Guidelines on addressing passenger safety through the hazard management process To be released in 2008; Working Group to be established in 2007
Collision Reduction:
Action Item Status
TCRP Project D-10 Audible Signals for Pedestrian Safety in Light Rail Transit Environments Final Report Released
TCRP Project A-30: Improving Safety Where Light Rail, Pedestrians, and Vehicles Intersect Contract awarded in July 2006; work underway
Oklahoma State University Best Practices Manual and Training Program SOW approved in March 2006; work underway
Operation Lifesaver (OLI) Light Rail Public Outreach and Driver Education Materials On-going FTA committee participation
FRA, Highway-Rail Grade Crossing and Trespasser Prevention Division, research, action plans, and safety data analysis On-going FTA participation; Secretary’s Action Plan to be released soon
Update to MUTCD, 2003, Part 10 - Traffic Controls for Highway-Light Rail Transit Grade Crossings On-going FTA participation
APTA rail grade crossing standards and recommended practices On-going FTA participation
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Rail Transit Vehicle Interface Standards Committee On-going FTA participation
American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Standards Committee for Rail Transit Vehicles (RT) Crashworthiness standard due in Fall 2006
FTA Accident Notification and Investigation Working Group On-going
Rules/Procedures Compliance:
Action Item Status
Training session on rules/procedures compliance assessment methods and techniques To be included at the 2007 SSO Program Manager’s Meeting
Working Group established with industry to develop recommended practice To be established in 2006
Rules/Procedures Compliance Assessment Guidelines developed To be released by the end of 2007
TSI/NTI training 2007
Fatigue Management:
Action Item Status
TSI/NTI training On-going
Response to NTSB recommendation R-06-3 Fall 2006
Transit Worker Safety:
Action Item Status
Training session on addressing transit worker safety in the SSO Program To be included at the 2007 SSO Program Manager’s Meeting
New FTA Circular and guidance addressing construction safety and security for major capital projects 2006
Revised FTA Project Management Oversight (PMO) guidelines on construction safety and security oversight 2007
Debris Management:
Action Item Status
FTA security initiative and standard on the use and design of trash cans in the rail transit environment 2007
Emergency Response:
Action Item Status
TSI/NTI training On-going
Reinstitution of the well-received FTA drill grant program 2007
NTD Training and Enhancements:
Action Item Status
Training session on NTD safety and security reporting for State Oversight Agency and rail transit agency safety personnel 2007
NTD logons and passwords for State Oversight Agency personnel 2007
Integration of NTD into SSO three-year safety review process On-going
FTA reporting on rail transit agency and State Oversight Agency performance measures and target goals 2007
FTA “top ten” safety initiatives website 2007

 

Exhibit 14: Rail Transit Industry Safety Performance Target Goals for Improvement

3-Year Industry Average Rate Target Goals for Improvement by 2006
Performance Measures Heavy Rail Light Rail Heavy Rail Light Rail
Total Safety Incidents per 10 Million Passenger Trips1 23.27 29.86 20.94 26.87
Total Safety Incidents per 1 Million Vehicle Miles1 9.96 16.15 8.96 14.54
Major Safety Incidents per 10 Million Passenger Trips2 .63 8.58 0.57 7.72
Major Safety Incidents per 10 Million Vehicle Miles2 2.74 45.44 2.47 40.90
Total Fatalities per 100 Million Passenger Trips (including suicides and trespasser-related deaths)1 2.79 5.51 2.51 4.96
Total Injuries per 10 Million Passenger Trips1 16.9 17.1 15.2 15.4
Total Collisions per 100 Million Passenger Trips1 5.33 149.08 4.80 134.17
Major Collisions per 100 Million Passenger Trips2 1.48 69.44 1.33 62.50
Major Rail Grade Crossing Collisions per 10 Million Passenger Trips2 0.01 46.30 0.01 41.67
Major Pedestrian and Trespasser Collisions per 10 Million Vehicle Miles2 .56 4.48 0.50 4.03
Fatalities from Major Collisions per 100 Million Passenger Miles2 .83 3.8 0.75 3.42
Injuries from Major Collisions per 100 Million Passenger Trips2 .77 28.93 0.69 26.04
Total Derailments per 100 Million Passenger Miles1 3.92 51.76 3.53 46.58
Total Personal Injury Events per 10 Million Passenger Trips1 16.43 12.85 14.78 11.57
Total Fires per 10 Million Vehicle Miles1 25.81 4.41 23.23 3.97
Major Fires per 10 Million Vehicle Miles2 4.45 .56 4.01 0.50
Average Number of Injuries per Incident .72 .61 0.65 0.55
1As reported on both NTD S&S-40 Form “Major Safety and Security Incidents” and NTD S&S-50 Form “Non-Major Summary Report”
2 As reported only on the NTD S&S-40 Form “Major Safety and Security Incidents”

 

Exhibit 15: SSO Agency Target Goals for Improvement

Performance Measure Target Goal for Improvement by 2009
Dedicated Personnel
  • Each State with a single rail transit agency in its jurisdiction that provides more than 15 million unlinked annual passenger trips has a minimum of 1 full-time equivalent devoted to the SSO Program.
  • Each State with a single rail transit agency in its jurisdiction that provides less than 15 million unlinked annual passenger trips has a minimum of .5 full-time equivalent devoted to the SSO Program.
  • Each State with more than one rail transit agency its jurisdiction has a minimum of 2 full-time equivalents devoted to the SSO Program.
Training and Certification
  • Each State Safety Oversight Program Manager has attended all three invitational workshops to be provided by FTA between 2007 and 2009, and has satisfactorily completed the oversight management training sessions, including completion of written tests.
  • 70 percent of State Safety Oversight Program Managers have obtained a certificate from the Transportation Safety Institute (TSI), Transit Safety and Security Division, attesting to their completion of five (5) specified rail transit safety and security courses within a consecutive three (3) year time-frame. These courses include:
    • Transit System Safety FT00464/Transit Rail System Safety FT00439
    • Transit Industrial Safety Management FT00457
    • Transit System Security FT00432
    • Effectively Managing Transit Emergencies FT00456
    • Transit Rail Incident Investigation FT00430
  • 50 percent of State Safety Oversight Program Managers have also completed National Transit Institute (NTI) training courses devoted to System Security Awareness for Transit Employees, Terrorist Activity Recognition and Reaction, and Toolbox for Transit Operator Fatigue: Putting the Report into Action.
  • 40 percent of State Safety Oversight Program Managers have obtained a certificate from the World Safety Organization (WSO), at a minimum classifying them as a Certified Safety Specialist.
Hazard Management Process
  • Each State Safety Oversight Agency, as demonstrated through FTA’s SSO Audit Program, oversees a hazard management process that effectively addresses passenger slips, trips, and falls and other single-person injury events at the rail transit agencies within their jurisdiction.
NTD Training and Participation
  • Each State Safety Oversight Program Manager has received a NTD logon and password; has received training in how to review NTD reports; and has integrated the use of NTD into their oversight of accident investigations.
Three-year Safety Reviews
  • Each State Oversight Agency has performed a three-year review for each of the rail transit agencies in its jurisdiction that meets all FTA requirements; including the review of programs for compliance with operating rules and procedures, transit worker safety, and safety data and acquisition, and has received, reviewed and approved corrective action plans from the rail transit agency to address any findings.

 

Appendix A

This appendix provides detailed analysis on the probable causes of fatalities and injuries occurring between 2003 and 2005.

Fatalities

The figure below provides an overview of the most common probable causes of fatalities in the rail transit industry.

 

Rail Transit Fatalities, 2003 – 2005

Exhibit A-1: Rail Transit Fatalities, 2003 – 2005

  • Suicides account for 40 percent of rail transit fatalities.
  • Passenger/Patron Action, which includes accidents resulting from risky or careless behavior by passengers on rail transit vehicles or patrons in rail transit stations and at rail transit stops, accounts for 21 percent of rail transit fatalities.
  • Trespasser-related incidents account for 13 percent of rail transit fatalities.
  • The “Other Causes” category, which accounts for 12 percent of rail transit fatalities, includes:
    • Health-related (9 fatalities),
    • Miscellaneous Non-Passenger Incidents (8 fatalities),
    • Inattentiveness (5 fatalities),
    • Homicides (5 fatalities),
    • Boarding/Deboarding (2 fatalities),
    • Escalators (2 fatalities),
    • Operating Procedures Violation (1 fatality), and
    • Material Falling from Structure or Train (1 fatality).
  • Pedestrian-related incidents account for 6 percent of fatalities.
  • Slips, trips and falls in stations accounted for 5 percent of rail transit fatalities.
  • Incidents involving drivers and passengers in other vehicles account for 4 percent of rail transit fatalities.

Heavy Rail

Heavy rail systems reported 217 fatalities between 2003 and 2005. The 60 fatalities reported in 2005 represent a decrease of 39% since 2003. Suicides and trespassing events accounted for 91 fatalities during the three-year period. An additional 56 fatalities were found to have occurred due to the actions of passengers or patrons, such as slips and falls onboard a train, leaning into an oncoming train at the station, exiting from the train prematurely, and leaping to the track bed.

Exhibit A-2: Heavy Rail Fatalities, 2003 – 2005

  • Heavy Rail fatalities have declined over the three-year period by 39%.
  • Over the period 2003 through 2005, Suicides, Trespassing, and Passenger/Patron Actions have accounted for 80% of all heavy rail fatalities.
  • Since 2003 Suicides, Trespassing, and Other Cause fatalities have decreased 51.

Light Rail

Light rail systems reported 60 fatalities between 2003 and 2005. Collisions resulted in 31 fatalities (52%) and “other” accidents resulted in 29 fatalities (48%). The following graphs present the reported light rail fatalities by probable cause.

Exhibit A-3: Light Rail Fatalities, 2003 - 2005

  • Light rail fatalities decreased by 17% in 2005 from 2004 but were still 25% higher than the level reported in 2003.
  • Suicides are the most common cause of light rail fatalities (17 fatalities). Combined with Trespassing-related deaths, the two probable causes account for 26 light rail fatalities (43%).
  • Suicides decreased by 60% in 2005.
  • Trespassing-related fatalities increased by 25% from 2003 to 2005.
  • External causes such as Pedestrians and Other Vehicles resulted in 17 light rail fatalities, 28% of all light rail fatalities between 2003 and 2005.
  • Pedestrian-caused fatalities have increased by 250% since 2003.
  • Other Vehicle-caused fatalities have decreased by 25% since 2003.

Exhibit A-4: Light Rail Collision Fatalities, 2003 - 2005

  • Pedestrian-caused fatalities increased by 250% between 2003 and 2005.
  • Pedestrians were the most common cause of light rail collision-related fatalities between 2003 and 2005, causing 15 fatalities (48% of light rail collision-related fatalities).
  • Fatalities due to Inattentiveness and Other Vehicles have decreased by 43% since 2003.
  • External causes such as Pedestrians and Other Vehicles accounted for 27 fatalities (87%) between 2003 and 2005.
  • Operator Inattentiveness caused 4 fatalities during the three-year period (13% of light rail collision-related fatalities).

Rail Grade Crossing Collisions

Light Rail systems reported 254 rail grade crossing collisions between 2003 and 2005. The 254 grade crossing collisions resulted in a total of 24 fatalities. The following graphs present the probable causes of the 24 rail grade crossing fatalities.

Exhibit A-5: Rail Grade Crossing Collision Fatalities, 2003 - 2005

  • Pedestrian and Other Vehicle-caused fatalities decreased by 64% between 2004 and 2005.
  • Pedestrians were the most common cause of rail grade crossing fatalities between 2003 and 2005, causing 11 fatalities (45% of grade crossing collisions).
  • Other Vehicles caused 10 grade crossing fatalities during the three-year period (42%).
  • External causes such as Pedestrians and Other Vehicles combined for 21 rail grade crossing fatalities (87%) between 2003 and 2005.
  • Operator Inattentiveness has not caused a grade crossing fatality since 2003.
  • Inattentiveness caused 3 grade crossing fatalities during the three-year period (13%).

 

Injuries

The figure below provides an overview of the most common probable causes of injuries in the rail transit industry.

Exhibit A-6: Rail Transit Injuries, 2003 – 2005

  • Total rail transit injuries have increased by 14% since 2003.
  • Slips Trips and Falls in the Station have increased by 19% since 2003.
  • Slips trips and Falls in the Station account for 53% of injuries since 2003.
  • The “Other Causes” category, which accounts for 12% of all rail transit injuries, includes Boarding/Deboarding (180 injuries), Propulsion Unit (170 injuries), Operating Rule Violation (137 injuries), Inattentiveness (108 injuries), Miscellaneous Non-Passenger Incidents (108 injuries), Pedestrian (103 injuries), Health-related (96 injuries), Suicide Attempts (75 injuries), Miscellaneous (57 injuries), Train Movement (47 injuries), Unknown (44 injuries), Elevator (30 injuries), Operating Procedures Violations (16 injuries), Cable Component Deficiency (16 injuries), Material Falling from Structure or Train (16 injuries), Track Component Deficiency (13 injuries), Passenger (13 injuries), Equipment/Maintenance (12 injuries), Employee (9 injuries), Trucks (3 injuries), Signal Component Failure (2 injuries), Crowd Control (1 injuries), Improper Procedures (1 injuries), Track Component Failure (1 injuries), and Signal Component Deficiency (1 injuries).

 

Heavy Rail

Heavy rail systems reported 8,732 injuries between 2003 and 2005. Collisions resulted in 49 injuries (0.56%), derailments resulted in 6 injuries (0.07%), fires resulted in 233 injuries (2.67%) and “other” accidents resulted in 8,444 injuries (96.70%). The following graphs present the reported heavy rail injuries by probable cause.

Exhibit A-7: Heavy Rail Injuries, 2003 - 2005

  • Heavy rail injuries due to Passenger/Patron Action, Assaults, Escalators, and Other Causes decreased by 43% in 2005.
  • Injuries due to Slips, Trips and Falls in the Station have increased by 24% since 2003.
  • Slips, Trips and Falls in the Station and Passenger/Patron Action resulted in a combined 6,978 injuries (82% of heavy rail injuries) over the three-year period.
    • Examples of Passenger/Patron Action include slips and falls aboard rail transit vehicles, patrons leaning into trains in the station, passengers prematurely exiting trains, and other miscellaneous passenger injuries.
  • The “Other Causes” category includes Trespassing (168 injuries), Propulsion Unit (159 injuries), Car Doors (134 injuries), Non-Passenger Incidents (108 injuries), Health-related events (92 injuries), Suicide Attempts (67 injuries), Miscellaneous (48 injuries), Boarding/Deboarding (41 injuries), Unknown (34 injuries), Elevators (29 injuries), Train Movement (27 injuries), Inattentiveness (24 injuries), Material Falling from Structure or Train (16 Injuries), Cable Component Deficiency (16 injuries), Track Component Deficiency (11 injuries), Passenger (7 injuries), Pedestrian (7 injuries), Equipment/Maintenance (7 injuries), Other Vehicle (4 injuries), Operating Procedures Violation (4 injuries), Trucks (3 injuries), Employee (3 injuries), Operating Rule Violation (2 injuries), Signal Component Failure (2 injuries), and Improper Procedures (1 injury).

 

Light Rail

Light rail systems reported 1,780 injuries between 2003 and 2005. Collisions resulted in 701 injuries (39.38%), derailments resulted in 17 injuries (0.96%), fires resulted in 3 injuries (0.17%) and “other” accidents resulted in 1,059 injuries (59.49%). The following graphs present the reported light rail injuries by probable cause.

Exhibit A-8: Light Rail Injuries, 2003 - 2005

  • Total light rail injuries have increased by 60% between 2003 and 2005.
  • Light rail assault injuries increased by 136% in 2005.
  • Other Vehicles and Pedestrians have caused a combined 467 light rail injuries over the three-year period. These two causes represent 25% of reported light rail injuries.
  • Light Rail assault-related injuries have increased dramatically between 2003 and 2005. Light systems reported 339 injuries due to assaults over the three-year period (19% of light rail injuries).
  • The 135 injuries due to Operating Rule Violations resulted from 36 accidents. This is an average of 3.75 injuries per Operating Rule Violation accident.
  • Injuries due to Slips, Trips and Falls in the Station have increased since 2003. Slips, Trips and Falls in the Station resulted in 189 injuries (11% of light rail injuries) over the three-year period.
  • The “Other Causes” category includes Inattentiveness (84 injuries), Car Door (81 injuries), Passenger/Patron Action (70 injuries), Trespassing (69 injuries), Operating Procedures Violation (12 injuries), Miscellaneous (9 injuries), Unknown (9 injuries), Suicide Attempts (7 injuries), Employee (6 injuries), Passenger (6 injuries), Equipment/Maintenance (5 injuries), Health-Related (4 injuries), Train Movement (4 injuries), Propulsion Unit (3 injuries), Track Component Deficiency (2 injuries), Track Component Failure (1 injury), Signal Component Deficiency (1 injury), and Elevator (1 injury).

 

Exhibit A-9: Light Rail Collision Injuries, 2003 - 2005

 

  • Total light rail collision-related injuries increased by 23% between 2003 and 2005.
  • Collisions due to Operator Inattentiveness have declined by 93% over the three-year period. Inattentiveness has caused 81 light rail collision-related injuries (12%) between 2003 and 2005.
  • Other Vehicles and Pedestrians have caused a combined 467 light rail collision-related injuries over the three-year period. These two probable causes represent 64% of reported light rail collision-related injuries.
  • An increasing number of light rail collision-related injuries have been caused by Operating Rule Violations between 2003 and 2005. Operating Rule Violations are responsible for 127 injuries (18%) over the three-year period.
  • The “Other Causes” category includes Operating Procedures Violation (12 injuries), Passenger (6 injuries), Miscellaneous (5 injuries), Track Component Deficiency (2 injuries), and Crowd Control (1 injury).

Rail Grade Crossing Collisions

Light Rail systems reported 254 rail grade crossing collisions between 2003 and 2005. The 254 grade crossing collisions resulted in a total of 335 injuries. The following graphs present the probable causes of the 335 rail grade crossing injuries.

Exhibit A-10: Light Rail Grade Crossing Collision Injuries, 2003 - 2005

  • Total rail grade crossing collision-related injuries have increased by 34% between 2003 and 2005.
  • Grade crossing collision injuries due to Other Vehicles and Pedestrians have increased by 61% over the three-year period. These two probable causes resulted in 275 injuries (82% of grade crossing injuries) between 2003 and 2005.
  • Operator Inattentiveness has decreased by 89% since 2003. Inattentiveness resulted in 38 injuries (11%) over the three-year period.
  • The “Other Causes” category includes Operating Rule Violation (14 injuries), Operating Procedures Violation (4 injuries), Signal Component Deficiency (2 injuries), and Miscellaneous (2 injuries).

 

Appendix B

This appendix provides probable cause data by accident types and rail transit modes by year.

Exhibit B-1: 2005 Probable Cause Distribution – Collisions, Derailments, Fires

Heavy Rail Light Rail Other Rail Total
Collisions Derailments Fires Collisions Derailments Fires Collisions Derailments Fires Collisions Derailments Fires
Probable Cause Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities
Car Equipment Failure
Car Body 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Propulsion Unit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0
Trucks 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Human Failure
Operating Rule Violation 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 77 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 77 0 1 3 0 0 0 0
Operating Procedures Violations 4 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 12 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 15 1 1 0 0 0 0 0
Drug/Alcohol Violation 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Fatigue 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Inattentiveness 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 4 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 7 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
Operations
Crowd Control 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Improper Procedures 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Track
Track Component Deficiency 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Track Component Failure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Signal
Signal Component Deficiency 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Signal Component Failure 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0
Cable
Cable Component Deficiency 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cable Component Failure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other Vehicle 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 63 124 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 63 124 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Passenger 4 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pedestrian 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 45 38 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 49 42 7 0 0 0 0 0 0
Miscellaneous 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 38 0 1 1 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 6 0 3 38 0
Total 15 13 2 2 3 0 3 38 0 133 258 11 5 8 0 1 3 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 150 272 13 7 11 0 4 41 0

 

Exhibit B-2: 2004 Probable Cause Distribution – Collisions, Derailments, Fires

Heavy Rail Light Rail Other Rail Total
Collisions Derailments Fires Collisions Derailments Fires Collisions Derailments Fires Collisions Derailments Fires
Probable Cause Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities
Car Equipment Failure
Car Body 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Propulsion Unit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8 0
Trucks 0 0 0 5 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 0 0 0 0
Human Failure
Operating Rule Violation 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 51 0 1 1 0 0 0 0
Operating Procedures Violations 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Drug/Alcohol Violation 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Fatigue 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Inattentiveness 3 21 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 37 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
Operations
Crowd Control 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Improper Procedures 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Track
Track Component Deficiency 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0
Track Component Failure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0
Signal
Signal Component Deficiency 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0
Signal Component Failure 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
Cable
Cable Component Deficiency 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Cable Component Failure 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Other Vehicle 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 77 130 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 77 130 5 0 0 0 0 0 0
Passenger 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pedestrian 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 37 31 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 37 31 6 0 0 0 0 0 0
Miscellaneous 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 0 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 0 0 0 0 2 6 0
Total 9 26 1 9 3 0 5 7 0 148 234 11 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8 0 157 260 12 12 5 0 6 15 0

 

Exhibit B-3: 2003 Probable Cause Distribution – Collisions, Derailments, Fires

Heavy Rail Light Rail Other Rail Total
Collisions Derailments Fires Collisions Derailments Fires Collisions Derailments Fires Collisions Derailments Fires
Probable Cause Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities Accidents Injuries Fatalities
Car Equipment Failure
Car Body 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Propulsion Unit 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 159 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 159 0
Trucks 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0
Human Failure
Operating Rule Violation 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 5 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 5 0 4 0 0
Operating Procedures Violations 1 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0
Drug/Alcohol Violation 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Fatigue 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Inattentiveness 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 29 61 3 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 29 61 3 1 2 0 0 0 0
Operations
Crowd Control 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Improper Procedures 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0
Track
Track Component Deficiency 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 11 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 11 0
Track Component Failure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Signal
Signal Component Deficiency 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Signal Component Failure 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Cable
Cable Component Deficiency 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 16 0
Cable Component Failure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Other Vehicle 2 3 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 94 118 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 96 121 4 0 0 0 2 1 0
Passenger 3 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 1 0 0 0 1 0 0
Pedestrian 7 4 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 29 26 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 36 30 5 0 0 0 0 0 0
Miscellaneous 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0
Total 14 10 4 11 0 0 14 188 0 155 209 9 13 7 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 169 219 13 24 7 0 16 188 0

 

Exhibit B-4: 2003 - 2005 Rail Grade Crossing Collision Probable Cause Distribution

Rail grade Crossing Collisions 2003 2004 2005 Total
Probable Cause Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat.
Car Equipment Failure
Car Body 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Propulsion Unit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Trucks 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Human Failure
Operating Rule Violation 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 14 0 2 14 0
Operating Procedures Violation 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 1 4 0
Drug Alcohol Violation 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Fatigue 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Inattentiveness 17 28 3 5 7 0 3 3 0 25 38 3
Operations
Crowd Control 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Improper Procedures 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Track
Track Component Deficiency 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Track Component Failure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Signal
Signal Component Deficiency 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0
Signal Component Failure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cable
Cable Component Deficiency 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cable Component Failure 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other Vehicle 81 60 4 51 76 5 47 103 1 179 239 10
Passenger 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Pedestrian 11 12 2 17 11 6 16 13 3 44 36 11
Miscellaneous 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 2 0
Total 111 103 9 73 94 11 70 138 4 254 335 24

 

Exhibit B-5: 2003 - 2005 Heavy Rail “Other” Accident Probable Cause Distribution

Heavy Rail “Other” Accident 2003 2004 2005
Probable Cause Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat.
Suicides 40 40 38 38 13 13
Suicide Attempts 19 19 28 29 45 19
Slips Trips and Falls 1,601 1,607 3 1,892 1,911 5 1,975 1,993 3
Boarding/Deboarding 14 15 0 9 8 1 17 18 0
Car Door 28 29 0 58 58 0 44 45 0
Escalators 154 153 1 131 131 0 58 57 1
Homicides 1 1 2 2 2 2
Assaults 5 6 331 331 62 62
Trespassing 24 12 13 158 152 5 11 4 9
Health-related 92 90 2 4 2 2 4 0 4
Passenger/Station Occupant 429 419 14 568 563 28 490 483 14
Material Falling from Structure or Train 3 2 1 6 9 0 5 5 0
Miscellaneous Non-Passenger Incidents 50 46 4 60 54 4 8 8 0
Train Movement 5 5 0 11 11 0 15 15 0
Elevator 8 9 0 5 4 0 16 16 0
Employee 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 2 0
Equipment/Maintenance 4 4 0 3 3 0 0 0 0
Unknown 2 2 0 9 19 0 13 13 0
Total 2,479 2,418 79 3,314 3,286 85 2,780 2,740 46

 

Exhibit B-6: 2003 - 2005 Light Rail “Other” Accident Probable Cause Distribution

Light Rail “Other” Accident 2003 2004 2005
Probable Cause Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat.
Suicides 3 3 10 10 4 4
Suicide Attempts 3 3 1 1 3 3
Slips Trips and Falls 95 95 0 59 57 2 37 37 0
Boarding/Deboarding 32 34 0 50 49 1 56 56 0
Car Door 18 18 0 38 38 0 25 25 0
Escalators 47 47 0 46 46 0 43 43 0
Homicides 0 0 0 0 0 0
Assaults 3 3 0 100 100 0 236 236 0
Trespassing 7 4 4 55 55 0 15 10 5
Health-related 3 3 0 0 0 0 1 1 0
Passenger/Station Occupant 15 15 0 23 23 0 32 32 0
Material Falling from Structure or Train 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Miscellaneous Non-Passenger Incidents 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Train Movement 1 1 0 2 2 0 1 1 0
Elevator 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Employee 4 4 0 0 0 0 2 2 0
Equipment/Maintenance 0 0 0 5 5 0 0 0 0
Unknown 7 3 0 5 5 0 1 1 0
Total 239 231 7 394 381 13 456 447 9

 

Exhibit B-7: 2003 - 2005 Other Rail “Other” Accident Probable Cause Distribution

Other Rail “Other” Accident 2003 2004 2005
Probable Cause Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat. Acc. Inj. Fat.
Suicides 0 0 0 0 2 2
Suicide Attempts 0 0 0 0 1 1
Slips Trips and Falls 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0
Boarding/Deboarding 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Car Door 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Escalators 0 0 0 4 4 0 0 0 0
Homicides 0 0 0 0 0 0
Assaults 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0
Trespassing 0 0 0 7 0 1 0 0 0
Health-related 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Passenger/Station Occupant 0 0 0 3 7 0 0 0 0
Material Falling from Structure or Train 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Miscellaneous Non-Passenger Incidents 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Train Movement 1 10 0 0 0 0 2 2 0
Elevator 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Employee 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Equipment/Maintenance 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Unknown 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0
Total 1 10 0 16 13 1 8 5 3

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