Job Access and Reverse Commute Competitive Grants; Availability of Funds; Solicitation for Grant Applications

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[Federal Register:  March 10, 2000  (Volume 65, Number 48)]
[Notices]               
[Page 13209-13220]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
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Part V


Department of Transportation


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Federal Transit Administration

Job Access and Reverse Commute Competitive Grants; Availability of 
Funds; Solicitation for Grant Applications; Notice

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
Federal Transit Administration
 
Job Access and Reverse Commute Competitive Grants
AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT.
ACTION: Notice of availability of funds: Solicitation for grant 
applications.
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SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Transportation's (DOT) Federal Transit 
Administration (FTA) announces the second round of competitive grants 
under the Job Access and Reverse Commute grant program, authorized 
under section 3037 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st 
Century (TEA-21). This announcement describes the conditions under 
which applications will be received for the FY 2000 Job Access and 
Reverse Commute competitive grants program and how FTA will determine 
which projects it will fund. It includes all of the information needed 
to apply for Job Access and Reverse Commute competitive grants. The 
announcement also contains information needed to apply for projects 
specifically allocated funding by Congress.
    This announcement is available on the U.S. Department of 
Transportation's FTA website at http://www.fta.dot.gov/wtw/. The 
website also has commonly asked questions and answers. FTA will 
announce final selections on the website and in the Federal Register.
DATES: FTA will make funding commitments for competitively selected Job 
Access and Reverse Commute projects through a two-stage process. All 
proposals must be submitted to the appropriate FTA regional office (see 
Appendix A) by the close of business May 9, 2000. After evaluation and 
selection, successful applicants will be required to submit 
supplementary documentation demonstrating compliance with all of FTA's 
Section 5307, ``Urbanized Area Formula Grants'' requirements. If the 
applicant so elects, a proposal and final application documenting 
standard FTA Section 5307 requirements may be submitted at the same 
time. Applications for congressionally-designated projects may be 
submitted as soon as they are completed, but not later than May 9, 
2000. A single application containing the proposal and documentation of 
Section 5307 requirements is required.
ADDRESSES: Comments on, or questions about, the Job Access and Reverse 
Commute program or the application process may be made at the email 
address: [JobAccess@dot.gov]. Or they may be mailed or faxed to the 
following address: Doug Birnie, Federal Transit Administration, Room 
9409, 400 7th Street, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20590 (FAX (202) 366-
3765).
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Contact the appropriate FTA Regional 
Administrator (see Appendix A) for application-specific information and 
issues. For general program information, contact Doug Birnie, Office of 
Research Management, TRI-30, (202) 366-0176, email 
douglas.birnie@dot.gov. A TDD is available at 1-800-877-8339 (TDD/
FIRS).
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
Table of Contents
I. Background
II. Changes in the Fiscal Year 2000 Solicitation
III. General Program Information
IV. Guidelines for Preparing Grant Application
V. Application Submission
VI. Grant Review Process
Appendix A  FTA Regional Offices
Appendix B  Definitions
Appendix C  Sample Project Budget
Appendix D  Summary of FTA's Section 5307 Requirements
Appendix E  ADA Certification
Appendix F  Agency Classifications
I. Background
    The Job Access and Reverse Commute Program has two major goals: to 
provide transportation services in urban, suburban and rural areas to 
assist welfare recipients and other low-income individuals in accessing 
employment opportunities, and to increase collaboration among the 
regional transportation providers, human service agencies and related 
service providers, employers, metropolitan planning organizations 
(MPOs), states, and affected communities and individuals.
    The Job Access and Reverse Commute grant program is intended to 
establish a regional approach to job access challenges through the 
establishment of an area-wide Job Access and Reverse Commute 
Transportation Plan. This plan is to be developed through a coordinated 
transportation/human services planning process. Projects derived from 
this plan support the implementation of a variety of transportation 
services that may be needed to connect welfare recipients and other 
low-income individuals to jobs and related employment activities. All 
projects funded under the Job Access and Reverse Commute grant program 
must be derived from such an area-wide plan.
    While the projects must be planned in coordination with traditional 
transit authorities, Metropolitan Planning Organizations and State 
Departments of Transportation, other interested organizations could 
take the lead in establishing the collaborative planning process or in 
submitting a project application.
    The Job Access and Reverse Commute grant program will support 
projects that are implemented by a wide range of transportation 
providers, but projects should be integrated within or coordinated with 
the existing transportation system and make efficient and effective use 
of existing transportation providers.
    FTA is placing special emphasis on consultation with the community 
to be served, including welfare recipients and low-income individuals, 
individuals with disabilities, migrant workers, Native Americans and 
community-based, faith-based and other organizations addressing the 
interests of such individuals.
    A Job Access project is designed to transport welfare recipients 
and low-income individuals in urban, suburban, or rural areas to and 
from jobs and activities related to their employment. Job Access 
projects implement new transportation services or extend existing 
services to fill the gaps that exist in many areas between where 
welfare recipients and low-income persons live and employment 
opportunities. Job Access and Reverse Commute grants funded under this 
program may not be used for planning or coordinating activities and 
cannot supplant existing sources of funding. Only new or expanded 
services are eligible for funding.
    Funding for Job Access and Reverse Commute grants is authorized at 
$150 million annually. The Transportation Equity Act for the 21st 
Century (TEA-21) provided guaranteed funding starting at $50 million in 
fiscal year (FY) 1999, increasing by $25 million a year, and reaching 
the full authorized $150 million in FY 2003. Funding above the 
guaranteed level depends on congressional appropriations. No more than 
$10 million annually can be used for grants designated as Reverse 
Commute projects.
    Program funding is divided in the following manner: sixty percent 
(60%) for areas with populations 200,000 and above, twenty percent 
(20%) for areas between 50,000-200,000 population, and twenty percent 
(20%) for areas below 50,000 population.
    Congress has appropriated $75 million for the Job Access and 
Reverse Commute grants in FY 2000. Of this amount, Congress has 
allocated $49.57 million for specific states and localities.
[[Page 13211]]
The remaining $25.4 million plus $4.2 million in unobligated FY 1999 
funding is available for competitive award. The following chart 
provides information on the amounts available for competitive projects 
in each funding category, as well as the amounts reserved for specific 
areas by each funding category.
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                                                       Approximate amounts for projects in areas
                                                        with population--(funding in millions)
                                                      ---------------------------------------------
                                                                                         Totals for
                                                       >200,000     50-      >50,000    all areas
-------------------------------------------------------------------200,000-------------------------
FY 2000 Funds Available............................      $45.0      $15.0      $15.0        $75.0
Amounts Reserved for Specific Projects.............       30.2        9.0       10.4         49.6
    FY 2000 Funds Available for Competitive Award..       14.8        6.0        4.6         25.4
FY 1999 Funds Not Allocated........................        1.0        2.8         .4          4.2
                                                     ---------------------------------------------
    Total Funds Available for Competitive Award....       15.8        8.8        5.0         29.6
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    A 50 percent non-DOT match is required. Other Federal funds that 
are eligible to be used for transportation costs can be used as part of 
the match. Applicants should submit projects that can be started within 
six months, but no later than within one year.
II. Changes in the Fiscal Year 2000 Solicitation
A. Area-Wide Job Access and Reverse Commute Transportation Plan
    In FY 1999, it was not clear to some what the difference was 
between the Regional Job Access and Reverse Commute Plan and the 
Regional Transportation Plan developed by Metropolitan Planning 
Organizations in urbanized areas as required by the FHWA/FTA Joint 
Planning regulations. The plans required for the Job Access and Reverse 
Commute program are short-term, operational service plans that are 
meant to address gaps in current transit service that impede welfare 
recipients and low-income persons from reaching jobs and employment 
support services. The Regional Transportation Plan is a long-range plan 
that identifies area transportation needs in light of projected growth 
patterns and broadly charts major capital investments for 
transportation system development to meet these projected needs. To 
avoid confusion, we have renamed job access plans as Area-Wide Job 
Access and Reverse Commute Transportation Plans.
B. Persons With Disabilities
    Because of high employment experienced by persons with disabilities 
and their more dispersed residential patterns, the Job Access and 
Reverse Commute Plans are now required to identify projects which 
address the mobility needs of this population in reaching employment 
sites and support activities. Applicants also must submit with their 
proposals a certification that the requirements of the Americans with 
Disabilities Act (ADA) will be met. (See Appendix E)
C. Multi-Year Commitments
    In FY 1999, a number of applicants sought multi-year commitments 
from FTA. Because of limited funding available, recipients of FY 1999 
Job Access and Reverse Commute funding seeking second year funding must 
compete with other applicants. They will be evaluated based on 
demonstrated progress in meeting the goals of their project, as well as 
on the general evaluation criteria. A full application must be 
submitted, including the transmittal memo, the proposal narrative and 
plan and any relevant updates, and documentation of demonstrated 
progress towards meeting project goals.
D. One-Step Application Process
    In fiscal year 1999, FTA required applications to be submitted in 
two stages: The project proposal, including the Job Access and Reverse 
Transportation Plan, to be submitted first, and for applications 
approved for funding, the supplementary documentation necessary to meet 
the requirements of FTA's Section 5307 program. Some applicants wished 
to have a one-step instead of a two-step application process. This 
year, applicants may submit the entire application simultaneously, 
including project proposal and the supplementary documentation, if they 
choose to. (See Sections II and III) Those wishing to submit a single 
application should work closely with the appropriate FTA regional 
office. (See Appendix A for Regional Contacts)
E. Projects for Congressionally-Designated Areas
    Applicants for projects supporting the development of local 
transportation services and related promotional activities in 
congressionally-selected areas must submit applications responding to 
the same program selection criteria as applications for competitive 
selection. Such applications shall demonstrate conformity with the 
requirements of the Job Access and Reverse Commute program and will 
provide information to demonstrate sound project management.
III. General Program Information
A. Authority
    Section 3037 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century 
(TEA-21).
B. Background
    While two-thirds of all new jobs are in the suburbs, three-quarters 
of welfare recipients live in rural areas or in central cities. In 
metropolitan areas with extensive transit systems, studies have shown 
that less than half of the jobs are accessible by transit. Even fewer 
jobs are accessible by transit in areas with limited transit systems. 
Many entry-level workers have difficulty reaching jobs during evening 
or weekend shifts when transit services are frequently diminished or 
non-existent. Work trips can also be complex, involving several 
destinations including childcare providers. The problems can be more 
challenging in rural areas where approximately 40 percent of rural 
counties lack public transit systems and commuting distances generally 
are longer than in urban areas.
    Auto ownership among welfare recipients and low-income persons is 
low. Most welfare recipients do not own cars and nearly 40 percent of 
workers with annual incomes below $10,000 do not commute by car. In 
1991, the median price of a new car was equivalent to 25 weeks of 
salary for the average worker and considerably more for the low-income 
worker.
    Transportation is clearly a key barrier to those moving from 
welfare to work. Providing a variety of new or expanded transportation 
options for low-income workers, especially those who are receiving or 
who have recently received welfare benefits, will increase the
[[Page 13212]]
likelihood that those workers will get and retain jobs.
    In FY 1999, $75 million was appropriated and FTA awarded 
approximately $71 million, $67.5 million for job access projects and 
$3.4 million for reverse commute projects. Successful applicants in the 
first round were announced on May 13, 1999 and included a variety of 
services ranging from extended bus routes and specialized van services 
reaching new employment sites to guaranteed ride home programs and late 
night and weekend service providing additional hours of service. 
Project descriptions can be found on the FTA website at 
(www.fta.dot.gov/wtw). The remaining uncommitted funds are added to the 
FY 2000 appropriation.
C. Scope
    Improving mobility and advancing economic development are key 
strategic goals of the U.S. Department of Transportation. Job Access 
funds help improve mobility and economic opportunity for welfare 
recipients and other low-income people through implementing new or 
expanded transportation activities. Reverse Commute funds help improve 
mobility to suburban employment opportunities for the general public, 
as well as for welfare recipients and low-income people.
D. Eligible Applicants
    Consistent with Section 3037 (b)(4)(A) & (B), local agencies and 
authorities, non-profit organizations and designated recipients under 
other FTA programs (usually a state entity or a regional transit 
authority) are eligible applicants for Job Access and Reverse Commute 
grant program funds. Local agencies and authorities include states, 
local governments, metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs), public 
transit agencies and tribal governments.
    In urbanized areas with 200,000 population or more, MPOs select the 
applicant(s). FTA urges MPOs to designate a single recipient to submit 
a consolidated application in urbanized areas with such populations.
    In small urbanized areas under 200,000 population and in non-
urbanized, rural areas, states select the applicant. For areas between 
50,000-200,000 population, applications forwarded to the state for 
selection must be endorsed by the area MPO as projects that the MPO 
would be willing to program in the Transportation Improvement Program 
if the projects were selected for funding States are urged to serve as 
the designated recipient for grants to small urbanized and non-
urbanized areas. The selected grant recipient can sub-allocate funds to 
other project participants.
    Tribal governments must go through the state selection process but, 
once selected, can choose to be sub-recipients of the state or, as 
sovereign governments, can apply directly to FTA. States are encouraged 
to work closely and expeditiously with tribal applicants. FTA regional 
offices are available to facilitate this process.
E. Eligible Projects
1. In General
    Job Access or Reverse Commute projects derived from an Area-Wide 
Job Access and Reverse Commute Transportation Plan are eligible. Please 
note that grants awarded under the Job Access and Reverse Commute 
program may not be used for planning or coordinating activities. 
(Section 3037(e)) However, metropolitan and statewide planning funds 
made available under the FTA Section 5303 and 5313(b) programs and 
FHWA/FTA Joint Planning, Section 49 CFR part 613, Section 23 CFR part 
420, and state planning and research funds (SPR) can be used to fund 
welfare to work transportation planning activities at a 100 percent 
Federal share. Other funds, including the U.S. Department of Health and 
Human Services' Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and the 
Department of Labor's Welfare-to-Work (WtW) administrative funds, can 
also be used for transportation planning activities consistent with the 
allowable uses of those resources. Lead applicants submitting 
consolidated applications on behalf of a number of subrecipients may 
apply for administrative costs up to ten percent of the grant request.
2. Job Access Project
    A Job Access project is directed at implementing new or expanded 
transportation services. These services are targeted at filling 
transportation gaps and designed to transport welfare recipients and 
low-income individuals to and from jobs and other employment-related 
support services such as childcare and job readiness, training and 
retention services. The Job Access Grant Program funds the capital and 
operating costs of new or expanded transportation services.
    Localities have wide flexibility in selecting service strategies 
that are appropriate for their areas, including, but not limited to:
    (a) Adding late night and weekend service;
    (b) Providing a guaranteed ride home service;
    (c) Initiating shuttle service;
    (d) Extending fixed route mass transit service;
    (e) Providing demand responsive van service;
    (f) Sponsoring ridesharing and carpooling activities; and
    (g) Encouraging bicycling.
    To improve customer service and operating efficiency, localities 
are encouraged to:
    (a) Establish regional mobility managers or transportation 
brokerage activities;
    (b) Apply Geographic Information System (GIS) tools;
    (c) Implement Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), including 
customer trip information technologies;
    (d) Integrate automated regional public transit and human service 
transportation, including health services, information, scheduling and 
dispatch functions; and
    (e) Deploy vehicle position monitoring systems.
    Job Access and Reverse Commute grants also may be used for 
promoting the use of:
    (a) Transit by workers with non-traditional work schedules,
    (b) The purchase of transit vouchers by appropriate agencies for 
welfare recipients and eligible low-income individuals;
    (c) The development of employer-provided transportation such as 
shuttles, ridesharing, carpooling; or
    (d) The use of transit pass programs and benefits under Section 132 
of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.
    Marketing and advertising are examples of promotional activities 
that could be undertaken to increase awareness of these transportation 
options and their benefit to welfare recipients and low-income 
individuals. Other locality-specific actions, strategies and linkages 
that further the program goals also may be eligible.
    While the marketing and promotion of transit pass programs are 
eligible expenses under the Job Access and Reverse Commute Program, the 
funding of individual transit passes is not an eligible expense. 
Additionally, the construction of child care centers and other 
employment support facilities at transit hubs are not eligible for Job 
Access grants. Transit-oriented construction activities are eligible 
under FTA's Section 5307, 5309 and 5311 Formula Grant programs. Transit 
passes are eligible expenses under Temporary Assistance for Needy 
Families (TANF) and Welfare-to-Work (WtW) programs.
    Programs for private automobile ownership and repair are not 
legally eligible under this grant funding
[[Page 13213]]
program. However, programs supporting carpooling and other forms of 
mass transportation and shared-ride use, such as jitneys or special 
paratransit service, are eligible. In cases where vehicle acquisition 
is part of the program, vehicles must remain under the continuing 
control of the agency receiving the grant.
3. Reverse Commute Project
    A Reverse Commute project facilitates the provision of new or 
expanded public mass transportation services for the general public 
from urban areas, suburban and rural areas to suburban work places. 
Reverse Commute services include, but are not limited to:
    (a) Bus, train, car and van pooling services, van routes, and
    (b) The purchase or lease by a nonprofit organization or public 
agency of a van or bus dedicated to shuttling employees from their 
residences and transit transfer points to a suburban work place and 
back again.
F. Cost Sharing
    The Job Access and Reverse Commute grant program is intended to 
fill gaps in existing services and leverage other Federal, state and 
local transportation-related funding to address the unmet needs of 
individuals moving from welfare to work and other low-income 
populations. Neither funds awarded under this grant program, nor funds 
used to match the grants, can be used to replace any existing source of 
funds.
    The maximum DOT share of a grant under the Job Access and Reverse 
Commute program may not exceed 50 percent of the total project cost. 
The non-DOT share shall be provided in cash. If funds are matched from 
other Federal programs, the funds must be applied directly to project 
expenses. Revenues from service agreements are an eligible match, but 
revenues from individual fares cannot be used as a match.
    Transportation-eligible funding from Federal programs other than 
the Department of Transportation may be used to match DOT funds. These 
funds include but are not limited to:
    a. Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF);
    b. Community Services Block Grants (CSBG) and Social Services Block 
Grants (SSBG) administered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human 
Services;
    c. Welfare-to-Work (WtW) formula and competitive grants 
administered by the U.S. Department of Labor; and
    d. Community Development Block grants (CDBG) and HOPE VI grants 
administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
    The prohibitions on the use of WtW funds for matching requirements 
under section 403(a)(5)(C)(ii) of the Social Security Act do not apply 
to Federal or state funds that provide transportation services. TANF 
and WtW grants, when used as a match, may be expended only for new or 
expanded transportation services and cannot be used for construction or 
to subsidize current transit operating expenses. Such funds also must 
supplement rather than supplant other state expenditures on 
transportation.
    Under the TANF Final Rule, investment in transportation services 
for families who are employed, including the purchase of transit 
vouchers, and investments used as match for the Job Access and Reverse 
Commute program, do not constitute ``assistance'' and, therefore, do 
not trigger the 60-month lifetime limit on receipt of Federal benefits 
nor the reporting requirements of families receiving ``assistance.'' 
The Secretaries of Transportation, Labor, and Health and Human Services 
released revised joint guidance on the use of WtW and TANF funds on 
December 23, 1998, which is currently being updated to reflect the 
changes in the final TANF rule. Guidance on TANF funds, including 
specific examples of eligible transportation investments, is available 
on the web at [http://www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/ofa/funds2.htm]. 
(``Child Support Performance and Incentives Act of 1998,'' Pub.L. 105-
200, Sec. 403, ``Limitations on Use of TANF Funds for Matching Under 
Certain Federal Transportation Programs.'').
    More extensive guidance on the use of TANF and WtW funds for 
transportation can be found on the FTA web site---- http://
www.fta.dot.gov/wtw.
G. Planning
1. Coordinated Transportation/Human Services Planning Process
    Proposed Job Access and Reverse Commute projects must be derived 
from an Area-Wide Job Access and Reverse Commute Transportation Plan 
(see below) which results from a coordinated public transit and human 
services transportation planning process. Any interested stakeholder 
group in the area may initiate the planning process. FTA encourages 
MPOs to serve as the regional forum in urbanized areas.
    The planning process must include transportation planning officials 
from state and metropolitan transportation planning organizations; 
representatives from local transit agencies and other existing human 
service, private, non-profit transportation operators; the agencies 
administering TANF and WtW formula and competitive grants, and the 
community to be served. Stakeholders within the community to be served 
include welfare recipients and low-income residents as well as, 
community and faith-based organizations, disability groups, farm and 
migrant worker organizations and other groups representing the 
interests of low-income persons.
    The planning process also should include other stakeholders 
organized transit labor representatives; employment, human service, and 
child care support service providers; a variety of local and state 
workforce development organizations including One-Stop Career Center; 
public and assisted housing providers and community development 
agencies; economic development agencies; employers and employer groups 
(such as transportation management organizations and Chambers of 
Commerce); elected representatives including tribal officials, and 
state officials including mayors, county supervisors, state 
legislators, governors and other state and local officials or their 
designates, and other interested public citizens.
2. Area-Wide Job Access and Reverse Commute Transportation Plan
    The purpose of collaboration is to develop a comprehensive area-
wide approach to providing transportation services to welfare 
recipients and low-income persons regardless of jurisdictional 
boundaries. In general, the Job Access and Reverse Commute program 
should be viewed as a catalyst to provide long-term mobility and access 
to jobs for welfare recipients and low-income individuals. Any project 
proposed for funding should be identified in the Area-Wide Job Access 
Transportation Plan resulting from the above process. The Plan is not 
meant to supersede, but to build upon existing area welfare-to-work 
transportation planning activities. The Area Wide Job Access and 
Reverse Commute Transportation Plan must:
    a. Identify the geographic distributions of welfare recipients and 
low-income people in the region;
    b. Identify the geographic distributions of employment centers and 
employment-related activities in the region;
    c. Identify existing public, private, non-profit and human service 
transportation services in the region;
    d. Identify transportation gaps between the geographic 
distributions of
[[Page 13214]]
people, as specified in section ``a,'' and employment, as specified in 
section ``b,'' which are not currently served by the transportation 
services, as specified in section ``c,''
    e. Identify projects to address the gaps identified in section 
``d.'' Each project identification must include:
    (1) the goals and objectives of the project
    (2) the cost of the project;
    (3) An explanation of how the project will maximize use of existing 
transportation service providers and what mechanisms will be used to 
integrate or coordinate the project services with the existing 
transportation network; and
    (4) Identification of any employer-provided or employer-assisted 
transportation service strategies incorporated in the project.
    Prioritize the project(s) identified in section ``e'' for funding 
and implementation. This is a requirement.
    The Area-Wide Job Access and Reverse Commute Transportation Plan 
should build on and incorporate existing welfare to work transportation 
planning activities.
    In addition, since low-income persons with disabilities tend to be 
more disbursed throughout the community than other low-income groups 
that are geographically more concentrated, the Plan should include 
specific identification of projects that will address the employment-
related needs of this population.
3. The Role of Metropolitan Planning Organizations
    MPOs are comprised of elected officials representing local 
governments and transportation service providers within the 
metropolitan area. They are responsible for adopting transportation 
plans and improvement programs to address a region's unique 
transportation needs and working with states to include these 
priorities in statewide plans.
    In regions with populations of more than 200,000, MPOs are 
responsible for selecting applicants to be considered for Federal Job 
Access and Reverse Commute grants. In regions with populations between 
50,000 and 200,000, MPOs will recommend projects to the state, which 
will select the applicants to be considered for Federal Job Access and 
Reverse Commute grants.
    This means that MPOs are responsible for the following:
    (a) Determining that Job Access and Reverse Commute projects are 
consistent with the regional long-range transportation plan.
    (b) Ensuring that the submitted application contains prioritized 
projects based on local need. Local priorities can be ascertained 
through the collaborative human services/transportation planning 
process and through consultation with the affected stakeholders.
    (c) Endorsing and subsequently programming Job Access and Reverse 
Commute projects into the area Transportation Improvement Program in 
urbanized areas of over 50,000 population.
    (d) Conducting the locally-developed public participation process 
as required by Joint FHWA/FTA Planning Rule (23 CFR part 450, 49 CFR 
part 613).
    In all regions with MPOs, individual Job Access and Reverse Commute 
projects must be adopted into the MPO's Transportation Improvement 
Program (TIP) prior to receiving a grant. Because this entails a formal 
review and project approval by the MPO Policy Board, FTA strongly urges 
the partners developing the Area-Wide Job Access and Reverse Commute 
Transportation Plan to communicate with the MPO at an early stage. 
Further, as financial sustainability of a project is one of the 
evaluation criteria, coordination with the agencies participating in 
the MPO forum could be a critical factor in ensuring long-term support 
for Job Access and Reverse Commute activities.
4. Statewide Transportation Planning Requirements
    In all regions with populations of less than 200,000, the state is 
responsible for selecting applicants, based on the recommendation of 
the MPO in areas between 50,000-200,000 population. In addition, Job 
Access and Reverse Commute projects selected for funding must be 
endorsed by the state and incorporated into the statewide 
transportation improvement program (STIP). Because this requires state 
approval, FTA strongly urges the partners to communicate with state 
officials, including the state DOT, at an early stage. In selecting 
projects in rural areas, states should give priority to projects 
providing service to places that are not currently served or are 
underserved by public transit systems. States must prioritize the 
projects for funding based on their analysis of local needs and service 
effectiveness, as well as the collaboration achieved among 
stakeholders. Given the sovereign nature of tribal governments, tribal 
projects need not be included in the state's prioritization of 
projects, though they must be included in the State Transportation 
Improvement Program (STIP).
5. Improved Transportation Planning
    The statewide and metropolitan transportation planning processes 
mandated by TEA-21 promote ongoing, cooperative, and active involvement 
of public transportation providers; the public; and state, metropolitan 
and local government agencies in the development of state-wide and 
metropolitan transportation plans and improvement programs. DOT expects 
that the Job Access and Reverse Commute grant program will be a 
catalyst for broadening the transportation planning process to better 
integrate employment and social equity considerations.
J. General Grant Requirements
    In addition to the project proposal based on the program-specific 
requirements outlined in this notice, the applicant will be required to 
submit appropriate certifications, assurances, and other documentation 
necessary to meet the requirements of FTA's Urbanized Area Formula 
Grant Program (Section 5307 program under Title 49, United States 
Code). These include planning, environmental, school bus, charter, 
procurement, labor protections and civil rights requirements, including 
the Americans with Disabilities Act, Title VI, Environmental Justice 
and Disadvantaged Business Enterprise, and drug and alcohol testing 
requirements.
    Applicants are encouraged to coordinate with affected transit labor 
unions and to gather all information required by the U.S. Department of 
Labor for labor certification as soon as possible to avoid delay in the 
certification process upon grant selection. (See Appendix F for a 
description of required information). Applicants must have the 
financial, legal, and technical capacity to apply for and administer 
projects. Copies of the Section 5307 program guidance (circular FTA 
9030.1B ``Urbanized Area Formula Program: Grant Application 
Instructions,'' Oct. 10, 1996) can be obtained from any FTA Regional 
Office or electronically through the FTA website. (See Appendix D for 
summary list.)
K. Performance Monitoring
    FTA requires grant recipients to monitor the performance of their 
Job Access and Reverse Commute services and to cooperate with the FTA 
and General Accounting Office (GAO) national evaluations mandated by 
law. Performance measures on: (1) Increasing access between welfare 
recipients and low-income populations and employment sites; and (2) job 
access/
[[Page 13215]]
reverse commute service effectiveness and efficiency will be sought. 
The required performance measures for FY 1999 grants may be found on 
FTA's web site (www.fta.dot.gov/wtw). Similar measures will be required 
for FY 2000 grantees. Performance monitoring primarily will take place 
through FTA standard project quarterly progress reports. Quarterly 
reports and other information must be reported in accordance with FTA's 
standard reporting requirements which are: (1) For projects in non-
urbanized areas, reporting requirements for the 5311 Program (FTA C 
9040.1E, page VI-6) annual status reports, annual financial status 
reports, and annual Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) reports; 
(2) for projects in urbanized areas, reporting requirements for the 
5307 Program, Transit Database Reporting, annual audits and triennial 
review.
IV. Guidelines for Preparing Grant Application
    FTA is conducting a national solicitation for applications under 
the Job Access and Reverse Commute Program. Grant awards will be made 
on a competitive basis. FTA encourages both traditional transportation 
recipients and a variety of new program entrants non-traditional 
grantees in urban, suburban, and rural areas to participate in the 
development of projects. To assist new program applicants in 
particular, a two-step application process is available. Applicants 
must submit a proposal that describes the proposed project for which 
funding is sought and responds to the requirements outlined in this 
Notice. If selected, the applicant must then document compliance with 
the standard FTA requirements listed in Appendix D as well as complete 
the securement of the financial match for the grant. Applicants may 
elect to submit a single application containing both the proposal and 
documentation of FTA standard requirements. Contact the appropriate FTA 
regional office for guidance on meeting standard FTA program 
requirements.
A. Grant Funding Amounts
    Suggested grant sizes are identified below. (Applicants may request 
smaller amounts from FTA.)
    1. For urbanized areas with populations of over one million, FTA 
expects to make grants of no more than $1 million. (Places with 
populations of above 5 million may request funding above $1 million.)
    2. For urbanized areas with populations greater than 200,000 and 
less than one million, FTA expects to make grants of no more than 
$500,000.
    3. For urbanized areas with populations between 50,000 and 200,000, 
FTA expects to make grants of no more than $200,000. States should not 
submit applications that collectively exceed $1 million for this 
category.
    4. For rural areas (areas with populations of less than 50,000), 
individual area grant applications generally should not exceed 
$150,000. Collective grant applications by states for rural areas 
should not exceed $1 million. Tribal applications may be considered 
separately from the state funding limitation.
B. Project Scope
    Proposed projects must be drawn from an Area-Wide Job Access and 
Reverse Commute Transportation Plan and focus on new or expanded 
transportation services. Applicants should focus on projects that can 
be started  within six months, but no later than within one year of 
grant award.
V. Application Development and Submission
    To promote collaboration and reduce administrative paperwork, FTA 
strongly encourages the submission of a consolidated application by a 
single entity in urbanized areas and the submission of a consolidated 
application by the state for rural areas. In both cases, funds may be 
passed on to sub-recipients. Tribal governments submitting projects 
that are selected by the state may choose to allow the state to include 
their project(s) in the state's application or, as sovereign 
governments, may apply directly to FTA. Since existing FTA grantees may 
have already met or have on file information that will satisfy many of 
the FTA requirements that apply to this program, FTA encourages states 
and local transit agencies to serve as the single entity by submitting 
applications on behalf of other entities.
    Applicants must submit an original and two paper copies of the 
application proposal to the appropriate FTA regional office. 
Additionally, the application proposal is to be submitted via e-mail to 
the FTA at: (JobAccess@dot.gov). If an applicant is unable to 
submit the application electronically via e-mail, the proposal should 
be submitted on a 3.5 formatted disk for use on a personal computer 
(PC). Documents should be submitted in Word or Rich Text Format (RTF). 
Tables should be submitted in an Excel, or Tab Delimited Format. 
Submissions must be postmarked by, as well as electronically sent, 
where feasible, to FTA by May 9, 2000.
    Applicants with access to TEAM, FTA's electronic grant making and 
management system, should enter standard grant information into TEAM 
once projects have been selected. For those applicants with access to 
TEAM that choose the one-step application process and submit a single 
comprehensive application (application proposal and standard section 
5307 requirements), all standard grant requirement information also 
should be entered into TEAM.
    The application proposal should provide detailed information on 
each project for which FY 2000 funds are being requested. The 
application should include the following elements:
A. Transmittal Memo
    Include the following information:
    1. The Name of Applicant(s) and the Type of Agency (See Appendix G 
for list of agency types).
    2. A List of Sub Recipients and the Types of Agencies (See Appendix 
G).
    3. Name, Address and Telephone Number of a Person to be Contacted 
for Additional Information.
    4. Name, Title, and Complete Address of Person to be Notified if 
Grant is Awarded.
    5. Area(s) to be Served: Cities, Counties, Tribal Lands and States.
    6. Project Summary. Two paragraphs to be used for press purposes 
should the application be selected for funding. The summary should 
contain: a brief description and list of the planning partners; a brief 
overview of the transportation challenges in the area; a brief 
description of the services to be funded; the intended project 
beneficiaries and the identification of any employment support services 
(e.g., training, child care, or housing) that will be coordinated with 
the proposed transportation services.
    7. A Brief Description of the Applicant's Organizational Capability 
to Carry Out the Project.
    8. Identification of the Area as a Designated Empowerment Zone, 
Enterprise Community, or Champion Community, if applicable.
    9. Total Federal Project Funding Requested:
Major Urbanized Area (Over 200,000 population)
     -  Job Access Amount: $
     -  Reverse Commute Amount: $
Medium Urbanized Area (50,000 to 200,000 Population)
     -  Job Access Amount: $
     -  Reverse Commute Amount: $
Non-urbanized Area (Rural and Small Urban--less than 50,000 Population)
[[Page 13216]]
     -  Job Access Amount: $
     -  Reverse Commute Amount: $
    10. Total Funds Requested
    Job Access Amount: $
     -  Reverse Commute Amount: $
     -  Total Requested: $
    11. Source(s) and Dollar Amount of Matching Funds.
B. Proposal Narrative
    Provide the information identified below to support your 
application for new or expanded services.
    1. Document the coordinated human services and transportation 
planning process. This should include:
    a. A brief description (no more than three pages--double spaced) of 
the collaborative transportation/human services process used in 
developing the Area-Wide Job Access and Reverse Commute Transportation 
Plan, including the coordination and consultation process with the 
organizations that have been specified by law: the community to be 
served, states and MPOs, existing transportation providers and transit 
agencies, agencies administering the TANF and WtW funds.
    b. A list of the above organizations and other participants in the 
Job Access and Reverse Commute planning process.
    c. A description of the results of the local Job Access and Reverse 
Commute Plan consultation process with the community to be served, 
including welfare recipients and low-income individuals, individuals 
with disabilities, migrant workers, Native Americans and community-
based, faith-based and other organizations addressing the interests of 
such individuals.
    d. Letters of endorsement or objections from planning partners.
    e. Applicant responses to any letters of objections.
    2. Document the unmet transportation needs on a region-wide basis 
from the Area-Wide Job Access and Reverse Commute Plan and provide 
project specific information on how the proposed services meet these 
needs. Where possible, provide maps depicting the information listed 
below (2a, 2b). Please provide the following information:
    a. Describe the unmet need for additional transportation services 
to transport those leaving welfare and low-income individuals to jobs, 
training and other employment services on an area-wide and project-
specific basis. This should include:
     -  A definition of the proposed project service areas, the 
communities to be served and the geographic area covered by the area-
wide job access and reverse commute plan.
     -  The number of welfare recipients and low-income persons 
and the percentage of the population that they represent within the 
proposed project service area and the percentage of the population that 
they represent within the geographic and project/s service area.
     -  A description of major employment opportunities.
     -  A description of the existing transportation network, 
including human services, nonprofit, private and public transportation 
providers.
     -  A description of transportation gaps in existing services 
for welfare recipients and low-income populations seeking to reach jobs 
and employment support services.
     -  For reverse commute projects, information on the need for 
additional transportation services
    b. MPOs and states should list projects in priority order for 
funding implementation and describe how each proposed project(s) will 
meet the unmet needs described above. Tribal projects do not have to be 
prioritized because they represent the projects of an independent 
sovereign government, not subject to state funding priorities. Include 
or address the following:
     -  Describe the applicant's organizational capacity to 
implement the project.
     -  Specify project goals and objectives.
     -  Provide indicators that will be used to monitor project 
performance and to make subsequent adjustments in project 
implementation.
     -  Describe the project.
     -  Provide operation-specific data (e.g. miles/hours of 
service, new routes, route extensions, reduced travel time for target 
population where appropriate, etc.).
     -  Estimate capital and operating project costs Estimate 
annualized cost per rider of proposed project. For job access projects, 
estimate low-income and welfare recipient ridership and total annual 
ridership.
     -  For reverse commute projects, estimate annual ridership.
     -  Percentage of target population to be served.
     -  Describe how the project will address the mobility needs 
of persons with disabilities and provide certification that the ADA 
requirements will be met. (Certification language--see Appendix E).
     -  Identify employment potential in the proposed project's 
service area, including the new jobs and/or job and employment support 
sites reached.
     -  Specify how existing service providers will be used to 
provide proposed services.
     -  Describe mechanisms to coordinate or integrate new 
transportation services within existing needs of target populations.
     -  For applicants who already have received Job Access and 
Reverse Commute grants in FY 1999, provide a report depicting progress 
toward meeting project goals/objectives and performance information on 
the items described above.
    3. Document financial commitments, including prospects for 
sustainability.
     -  Document sources, or expected sources, of matching funds.
     -  Provide letters of financial commitment, or intent to 
commit, that document local match.
     -  Identify how TANF, WtW, other Federal, state or local 
financial resources will be leveraged.
     -  Identify the financial commitment of existing 
transportation providers.
     -  Identify employer-provided resources.
     -  Identify long-term financing that may be proposed or 
available to support continuation of the proposed project or other 
aspects of the regional plan, including continued transit, human 
service and employer provided financial resources.
    4. For application for continuation of services previously funded 
in FY 1999, applicants must provide information on financial 
commitments plus information drawn from their progress reports that 
demonstrates achievements in meeting project objectives, including the 
number of:
     -  New employment sites reached.
     -  New employers reached.
     -  New jobs reached.
     -  New employment support facilities reached.
     -  New residential areas served with target populations.
     -  Ridership on new services, including, if available, number 
of welfare recipients and low-income persons served, [these figures may 
be generated by periodic surveys].
     -  Cost per rider.
     -  Additional vehicle hours of services provided.
     -  Other progress and results toward meeting project goals.
C. Project Budget
    Provide a project budget for each project. (see Appendix C).
VI. Grant Review Process
    Applications for competitive funding are to be submitted to the 
appropriate FTA Regional Office by the close of business TBD. FTA will 
screen all applications to determine whether all required eligibility 
elements, as
[[Page 13217]]
described in the following checklist, are present. FTA will select 
projects based on what is most advantageous to the government, 
considering, in addition to the award criteria, the time frame in which 
projects can be implemented, Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community 
status, use of innovative approaches, such as transportation mobility 
management/brokerage institutional arrangements and the application of 
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Intelligent Transportation 
Systems (ITS ) technologies, and geographic distribution of project 
funding.
A. Project Eligibility Checklist--include the following:
    This checklist is provided for the applicant to use to ensure that 
the required documentation has been provided in the application. 
Failure to provide the documentation listed below will make an 
applicant's proposal non-responsive and it will not be evaluated 
further.
    (1) A description of the applicant's organizational capacity to 
implement the proposed project(s).
    (2) A brief description and documentation of a coordinated 
transportation/human services planning process.
    (3) An Area-Wide Job Access and Reverse Commute Transportation 
Plan. The plan must prioritize and rank projects for funding. Tribal 
projects are exempted for prioritization.
    (4) A brief description of each project proposed.
    (5) Documentation of matching funds.
    (6) Documentation of approval by affected transit authorities.
    (7) For urbanized areas with populations over 200,000, 
documentation of the MPO selection and intention to amend the 
Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP) if the project is selected for 
funding.
    (8) For urbanized areas with populations between 50,000 and 
200,000, documentation of the state selection and MPO intention to 
amend the TIP if project is selected for funding.
    (9) For areas with populations below 50,000, documentation of the 
state selection and intention to amend the state-wide transportation 
improvement plan (STIP) if project is selected for funding.
    (10) Description of the results of the consultation process with 
the community to be served.
B. Award Criteria for Competitive Grants:
    Once eligibility is established, the merit of each application will 
be evaluated based on the following factors. (The number of points in 
parentheses indicates the maximum level of points for a given factor.)
    1. A coordinated human services/transportation planning process. 
(25 points). Evaluated based on the extent to which the applicant 
demonstrates a collaborative planning process and the extent to which 
the organizations listed below demonstrate support for the projects. 
The entities include the following:
     -  Existing transportation service providers;
     -  The state or local agencies that administer the state 
program funded under Part A of Title IV of the Social Security Act 
(TANF and WtW grant programs);
     -  Public housing agencies (including Indian tribes and their 
tribally designated housing entities as defined by the Secretary of 
Housing and Urban Development), especially those applying for Welfare 
to Work Housing Vouchers from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban 
Development
     -  Other human service and employment service agencies and 
providers;
     -  The community to be served, including welfare recipients 
and low-income residents, community-based and faith-based 
organizations, disability groups, farm and migrant organizations, 
tribal associations and other organizations representing the interests 
of low-income persons;
     -  Employers and their organizations; and
     -  Other area stakeholders.
    An Area-Wide Job Access and Reverse Commute Transportation Plan 
addressing the transportation needs of welfare recipients and low-
income individuals (60 pts.)
    a. Demonstrated need for additional transportation services (30 
Points)
    Evaluated based on the extent to which the applicant demonstrates:
     -  For a job access project, the relative need for additional 
services in the area to be served to transport welfare recipients and 
eligible low-income individuals to and from jobs, training and other 
employment support services; and
     -  For a reverse commute project, the need for additional 
services to transport individuals to suburban employment opportunities. 
b.
    b. Extent to which proposed services will meet the need for 
services (30 Points)--Evaluated based on the extent to which:
     -  The proposed service will meet needs, including those 
associated with accessing jobs and employment-related services such as 
training and child care.
     -  The applicant demonstrates the maximum use of existing 
transportation service providers and how services will be coordinated 
with existing the transportation network.
    3. Financial commitments (15 points)
    Evaluated based on the extent to which the applicant identifies:
     -  Long-term financing strategies to support proposed 
services.
     -  Commitment of financial match by source, e.g.
--human service agencies and providers.
--employers.
--existing transportation providers.
C. Notification for Competitive Selections
    FTA will notify applicants of selection decisions. Those selected 
must then submit appropriate certifications, assurances, and other 
documentation necessary to meet the applicable FTA Section 5307 
Urbanized Area Formula Grant Program requirements and be included in 
the TIP or STIP as appropriate, if these requirements had not been met. 
Technical assistance regarding these requirements is available in each 
FTA regional office.
    FTA is committed to obligating FY 2000 Job Access and Reverse 
Commute funding expeditiously. Therefore, FTA urges applicants to 
develop documentation in accordance with the Section 5307 program 
guidance as soon as possible. This allows the information necessary for 
grant approval to be readily available for submission to FTA when 
projects are selected for funding. FTA will approve final applications 
as soon as they are complete.
    Issued on: March 3, 2000.
Nuria I. Fernandez,
Acting Administrator.
Appendix A: (FTA) Regional Offices
Region I--Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire, 
Vermont and Maine
    Richard H. Doyle, FTA--Regional Administrator, Kendall Square, 
55 Broadway, Suite 920, Cambridge, MA 02142-1093,
    (617) 494-2055
Region II--New York, New Jersey, Virgin Islands,
    Letitia Thompson, FTA--Regional Administrator, One Bowling 
Green, Room 429, New York, NY 10004-1415, (212) 668-2170
Region III--Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, 
Delaware, Washington D.C.
    Sheldon Kinbar, FTA--Regional Administrator, 1760 Market Street, 
Suite 500, Philadelphia, PA 19103-4124, (215) 656-7100
[[Page 13218]]
Region IV--Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, 
Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama, Puerto Rico
    Susan Schruth, FTA--Regional Administrator, 61 Forsyth Street, 
S.W., Suite 17T50, Atlanta, GA 30303-8917, (404) 562-3500
Region V--Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan
    Joel Ettinger, FTA--Regional Administrator, 200 West Adams 
Street, Suite 2410, Chicago, IL 60606-5232, (312) 353-2789
Region VI--Texas, New Mexico, Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma
    Lee Waddleton, FTA--Regional Administrator, 819 Taylor Street, 
Room 8A36, Ft. Worth, TX 76102-9003, (817) 978-0550
Region VII--Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri
    Mokhtee Ahmad, FTA--Regional Administrator, 901 Locust Street, 
Suite 404, Kansas City, M0 64106, (816) 329-3920
Region VIII--Colorado, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, 
Utah
    Louis Mraz, FTA--Regional Administrator, Columbine Place, Suite 
650, 216 Sixteenth Street, Denver, CO 80202-5120, (303) 844-3242
    Region IX--California, Arizona, Nevada, Hawaii, American Samoa, 
Guam
    Leslie Rogers, FTA--Regional Administrator, 201 Mission Street, 
Suite 2210, San Francisco, CA 94105-1839, (415) 744-3133
    Region X--Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Alaska
    Helen Knoll, FTA--Regional Administrator, Jackson Federal 
Building, Suite 3142, 915 Second Avenue, Seattle, WA 98174-1002, 
(206) 220-7954.
Appendix B: Definitions
    1. Welfare Recipient--An individual who receives or received aid 
or assistance under a state program funded under Part A of Title IV 
of the Social Security Act (whether in effect before or after the 
effective date of the amendments made by Title I of the Personal 
Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 
(Public Law 104-193); (110 Stat. 2110)) at any time during the 
three-year period before the date on which the applicant applies for 
a grant.
    2. Eligible Low-Income Individual--An individual whose family 
income is at or below 150 percent of the poverty line (as that term 
is defined in Section 673(2) of the Community Services Block Grant 
Act (42 U.S.C. 9902(2)) including any revisions required by that 
section for a family of the size involved, as calculated by HHS. The 
1999 guidelines were published in the March 18, 1999, (Volume 64, 
Number 52) Federal Register, page 13428-13430, and are available on 
the web at [http://www.aoa.gov/network/99hhspov.html].
    3. Existing Transportation Service Providers--Public 
transportation providers including public, private and non-profit 
fixed route and paratransit operators, and governmental agencies and 
nonprofit organizations that receive assistance from Federal, state, 
or local sources for non-emergency transportation services.
    4. Human Services Providers--Agencies and organizations involved 
in helping welfare recipients and low-income populations to make the 
transition to work and providing supportive employment services. 
These agencies and organizations include state and local workforce 
development organizations, agencies administering TANF and WtW 
formula and competitive funds, public and assisted housing providers 
and community development agencies, and, where appropriate, faith-
based and community-based organizations providing employment support 
services.
    5. Qualified Entity--(A) With respect to any proposed eligible 
project in an urbanized area with a population of at least 200,000, 
the applicant(s) selected by the appropriate Metropolitan Planning 
Organization that meets the program eligibility requirements, 
including planning and coordination requirements, from among local 
governmental authorities and agencies and nonprofit organizations 
and; (B) With respect to any proposed eligible project in an 
urbanized area with a population of greater than 50,000 and less 
than 200,000, or an area other than an urbanized area, the 
applicant(s) selected by the chief executive officer of the state in 
which the area is located that meets the program eligibility 
requirements, including the planning and coordination requirements, 
from among local governmental authorities and nonprofit 
organizations.
    6. Transit Capital and Operating Assistance Projects--Projects 
to finance acquisition, construction, improvement, and operating 
costs of facilities, equipment and associated capital maintenance 
items used in mass transportation service, including crime 
prevention and security of and for such equipment and facilities. 
Direct administrative expenses associated with the provision of job 
access and reverse commute services are also eligible operating 
expenses.
    7. Community to be Served--neighborhoods and geographic areas 
with a disproportionate number of welfare recipients and low-income 
residents as compared to the general population, and population 
groups such as tribes, migrant workers, and persons with 
disabilities who experience a disproportionate number of welfare 
recipients and low-income persons within them.
Appendix C: Sample Project Budget (One for each project)
                        Fiscal Year 2000 Funding
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     Area size
                Applicant                -------------------------------
                                          Federal amount   Total amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          A. Job Access Project
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Capital Costs                             ..............  ..............
  Activity..............................  ..............  ..............
    Quantity............................  ..............  ..............
  Activity..............................  ..............  ..............
    Quantity............................  ..............  ..............
Example:                                  ..............  ..............
  Activity    Vans......................  ..............  ..............
      Quantity 4........................  ..............  ..............
Operating Costs:                          ..............  ..............
  Activity..............................  ..............  ..............
  Activity..............................  ..............  ..............
Example:                                  ..............  ..............
  Activity Late Night...................  ..............  ..............
Service (3 Routes):                       ..............  ..............
      Total.............................  ..............  ..............
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       B. Reverse Commute Project
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Capital Costs:                            ..............  ..............
  Activity..............................  ..............  ..............
[[Page 13219]]

    Quantity............................  ..............  ..............
  Activity..............................  ..............  ..............
    Quantity............................  ..............  ..............
Example:                                  ..............  ..............
    Activity    Vans....................  ..............  ..............
      Quantity 4........................  ..............  ..............
Operating Costs:                          ..............  ..............
    Activity............................  ..............  ..............
    Activity............................  ..............  ..............
Example:                                  ..............  ..............
    Activity    Two new routes..........  ..............  ..............
      Total.............................  ..............  ..............
      Grand Total (A or B or A & B).....  ..............  ..............
------------------------------------------------------------------------
For those applicants seeking a multi-year commitment, provide this
  information for subsequent years or reference budget material from
  your Area-wide Job Access Transportation Plan.
Appendix D: Summary of FTA'S Section 5307 Requirements
    This is the full range of 5307 requirements. Some of these items 
are covered in the application, in which case you will not need to 
submit information twice.
Approval Prerequisites
(On file with FTA, or to be submitted with application and updates 
as appropriate)
Opinion of Counsel
Authorizing Resolution
Current annual Certification and Assurances
Civil rights submissions up-to-date
    Title VI
    Annual DBE Goal
    DBE Program
    EEO Program
    ADA
National Transit Database reports up-to-date
Any outstanding oversight findings resolved or resolution plan and 
schedule set
Additional Information
Project Budget
Project Description
Project Justification/Supporting Information as necessary
Project Milestone Schedule
Labor Union Description(s) (See Appendix F for a description of 
required information)
Environmental Review
    Date of FTA's signing of FONSI (Finding of No Significant 
Impact), or
    Date of FTA's signing of ROD (Record of Decision) closing out 
the EIS process, or
    Grant applicant's Categorical Exclusion recommendation if 
neither (a) nor (b) above applies
Air Quality
    Date of project level conformity determination by FTA, or
    Applicant's recommendation concerning list of exemptions in the 
conformity regulation (40 CFR Part 51)
STIP--Date of Approval by FTA
Request for copy of Master Agreement (If applicant does not have 
latest one on file)
Appendix E: ADA Certification
Assurance of Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability
    As required by U.S. DOT regulations, ``Nondiscrimination on the 
Basis of Handicap in Programs and Activities Receiving or Benefiting 
from Federal Financial Assistance,'' at 49 CFR part 27, implementing 
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the Americans with 
Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, the Applicant assures that, as 
a condition to the approval or extension of any Federal assistance 
awarded by FTA to construct any facility, obtain any rolling stock 
or other equipment, undertake studies, conduct research, or to 
participate in or obtain any benefit from any program administered 
by FTA, no otherwise qualified person with a disability shall be, 
solely by reason of that disability, excluded from participation in, 
denied the benefits of, or otherwise subjected to discrimination in 
any program or activity receiving or benefiting from Federal 
assistance administered by the FTA or any entity within U.S. DOT. 
The Applicant assures that project implementation and operations so 
assisted will comply with all applicable requirements of U.S. DOT 29 
U.S.C. 794, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as 
amended, 42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq. At 49 CFR parts 27, 37, and 38, and 
any applicable regulations and directives issued by other Federal 
departments or agencies.
Appendix F: Information Required by the U.S. Department of Labor for 
Labor Certification
I. Background
    Federal Transit law requires that fair and equitable 
arrangements must be made, as determined by the U.S. Department of 
Labor (DOL), to protect the interests of employees affected by Job 
Access and Reverse Commute grants. These interests include the 
preservation of rights, privileges, and benefits under existing 
collective bargaining agreements, the continuation of collective 
bargaining rights, the protection of individual employees against a 
worsening of their positions related to employment, assurances of 
employment to employees of acquired mass transportation systems, 
priority of reemployment, and paid training or retraining.
    DOL processes the employee protection certifications required 
under section 5333(b) in accordance with procedural Guidelines 
published at 29 CFR 215.3 (July 28, 1999 Federal Register). The DOL 
will process Job Access grants serving populations of 200,000 or 
more by referring a copy of the grant application to labor 
organizations representing affected employees and seeking the views 
of organized labor and the grant recipients on proposed 
certification terms. For grants serving populations under 200,000, 
DOL will issue its certification without seeking the views of the 
parties. In either case, the certification terms will be based on 
existing protective arrangements used for prior FTA grants, if any, 
or standard operating and/or capital arrangements developed by the 
DOL where there are no existing arrangements. (Such existing 
arrangements do not include the Special Section 13(c) Warranty that 
is used for projects funded under the Section 5311 program.)
    It is essential where there are questions regarding the DOL 
certification process and/or information needed by DOL to obtain a 
labor certification that the applicant contact the appropriate 
Regional Office immediately. Where information lacks specificity, is 
unclear or is missing, DOL will place the grant application in an 
``incomplete'' status until the necessary information is received. 
Conceptual terms such as ``collaborative effort'' or ``working in 
conjunction with * * *'' or ``services will be provided to assist * 
* *'' do not provide the specificity necessary for DOL to process a 
grant.
    Upon receipt of a grant application, DOL will determine whether 
there is sufficient information to process the grant application. 
Because it is DOL's responsibility to address the protections 
afforded employees through the certification of appropriate 
protections, it must examine the activities of each subrecipient 
under the grant in order to frame a protective arrangement 
appropriate to the activity funded. The following information is 
needed by DOL to process all Job Access and Reverse Commute grant
[[Page 13220]]
applications (including those areas under 200,000).
II. Description of Required Information
    DOL needs the following information to process a grant 
application for labor certification.
    a. Project Description (Brief). This section should contain a 
brief, succinct description of what is in the project. This 
generally would cover the major budget line items.
    b. Project Description (Detail). This section should provide a 
complete description of each activity to be undertaken. It should 
include funding information, what the project application is for, 
how and where line items will be used whether the project is new 
service, and a description of the operating service area of the 
recipient or subrecipient. If there is more than one subrecipient 
under a grant, this information must be developed for each 
subrecipient's portion of the project.
    c. Grantee Contact Person. This information is not contained in 
the TEAM application. Under ``Project Details'' please enter the 
name of a contact person for the grantee. In addition, if the grant 
will ``pass through'' funding to one or more subrecipients or other 
public entities, enter the full name of the subrecipient or other 
public entity, a contact name, mailing address, telephone number and 
facsimile number for each of these.
    d. Union Information. This information is not contained in the 
TEAM application. Under ``Project Details'' please (1) identify all 
the labor organizations that represent transit employees of the 
recipient and each subrecipient, and (2) identify any other 
transportation providers which operate in the service area of the 
recipient and the subrecipients and all labor organizations that 
represent employees of these other transportation providers. Because 
employee protections are not limited to the employees of the grant 
recipient, other service area providers must be identified. Please 
note that a useful reference for obtaining labor union information 
is contained in Directory of U.S. Labor Organizations, 1999 edition. 
This may be purchased from the Bureau of National Affairs Books, 
P.O. Box 7814, Edison, N.J. 08810-7814. Telephone orders: 1-(800)-
960-1220.
    For each local of a nationally affiliated union, the applicant 
must provide the name of the national organization and the number or 
other designation of the local union. (For example, Amalgamated 
Transit Union Local 1258.) Since DOL makes its referral to the 
national union's headquarters, there is no need to provide a local 
contact in these situations.
    However, for each independent labor organization (i.e., a union 
that is not affiliated with a national or international 
organization) the local contact information will be necessary (name 
of organization, contact person, mailing address, telephone number, 
facsimile number).
    e. Extended Budget Descriptions. This must provide a project 
description and project justification for most line items. There are 
few line items that need no additional description and/or 
justification. If there are subreceipients under a grant, indicate 
which subrecipient will receive funds under each budget description.
    If you have any questions, please contact the U.S. Department of 
Labor, Division of Statutory Programs, at (202) 693-0126

Appendix G: Agency Classifications
State Government
    State DOT
    State Human Services
    State Labor/Employment
    Other State Agencies
Indian Tribe
Transportation Providers
    Public Transportation Providers
    Regional Public Transit Authority
    State Transit Agency
    City Transit Agency
    County Transit Agency
    Private for Profit Companies
    Bus
    Taxi
    Specialized Service (e.g., Medicaid Operator)
    Other
    Non-Profit Organizations
    Human Services Transportation Provider
    Community-Based Organization
    Other
Transportation Planning Organizations
    MPO
    Council of Governments
    Other
Local governments--General Purpose
    County Government
    City Government
Human Sevice Agencies
    Local County/City Public Human Svcs Agency
    Local County/City Welfare Agency
    Local County/City Workforce Development Agency
    Local Public Housing Agency
    Non-Profit Service Providers
    Human Support Services (e.g., Child Care, Substance Abuse)
     Employment (e.g., Job Training,   Job Placement)
Economic Development Agencies
    Local/County Government
    Non-Profit Corporations
Private Nonprofit Agencies
    Community Action Agencies & Organizations
    Community-Based Organizations
    Faith-Based Organizations
    Other private nonprofit organizations
Business Organizations
    Chamber of Commerce
    Transportation Management Organization
Other Organizations
[FR Doc. 00-5810 Filed 3-9-00; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-57-U