Existing Federal Funding Commitments

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Fifteen projects have existing FFGAs that commit FTA to provide specified levels of major capital investment funding. One of these projects, the Maryland MARC commuter rail extension from Point of Rocks to Frederick, is not included in the funding recommendations because the FY 2000 appropriation fulfilled the Federal funding commitment. The remaining 14 projects will require a total of $639.29 million in FY 2001. The status of these projects and the individual funding recommendations for FY 2001 are described below. For six of these projects, the funding recommendation represents the amount specified in Attachment 6 of the FFGA for FY 2001. For seven of these projects, the recommendation is based on the total remaining Federal funding commitment needed to complete the project; i.e., the amount outstanding as a result of prior year appropriations that were less than the amounts scheduled in Attachment 6 of their respective FFGAs. For one project, the recommendation reflects the remaining commitment, plus additional funds needed in FY 2001 under a proposed amendment to the FFGA. All of these projects have been authorized by TEA-21, and all were either under an FFGA prior to TEA-21 or have been rated as "recommended" or higher at the time the FFGA was issued.

Atlanta/North Springs

The Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) is constructing a 1.9-mile, 2-station extension of the North Line from the Dunwoody station to North Springs. When completed, this extension will serve the rapidly-growing area north of Atlanta, which includes Perimeter Center and north Fulton County, and will connect this area with the rest of the region by providing better transit service for both commuters and inner-city residents traveling to expanding job opportunities.

On December 20, 1994, FTA issued an FFGA committing a total of $305.01 million in new starts funding to this project. In the Conference Report to the FY 2000 appropriations act, FTA was instructed to amend the FFGA for this project to incorporate a change in scope as authorized under Section 3030(d)(2) of TEA-21. Accordingly, on October 28, 1999, FTA notified Congress of its intent to revise the scope of this project to include 28 additional railcars, a multilevel parking facility in lieu of a surface parking lot, and enhancements to customer security and amenity measures at the Sandy Springs and North Springs stations. These changes will increase the total project cost to $463.18 million, and the Federal share to $370.54 million. Of the $65.53 million increase in Federal funding, $10.67 million will be applied from unexpended funds identified from cost savings on the Dunwoody section of the North Line extension. This amendment is pending.

Of the original $305.01 million commitment, a total of $249.87 million has been appropriated through FY 1999. The FY 2000 appropriation provided an additional $44.29 million, leaving $10.85 million required to fulfill the terms of the original FFGA for this project. In order to fulfill the original commitment, and in anticipation of the FFGA amendment, $25.00 million in new starts funding is recommended for this project in FY 2001. This amount includes the $10.85 million remaining under the original FFGA.

Boston/South Boston Piers Transitway Phase 1

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) is developing an underground transitway to connect the existing transit system with the South Boston Piers area. The Piers area, which is connected to the central business district (CBD) by three local bridges, is undergoing significant development. A 1.5-mile tunnel, which is planned to be constructed in two phases, will extend from the existing Boylston Station to the World Trade Center; five underground stations will provide connections to the MBTA's Red, Orange, and Green Lines. Dual-mode trackless trolleys will operate in the transitway tunnel and on surface routes in the eastern end of the Piers area.

Phase 1 of this project consists of a 1-mile, three-station bus tunnel between South Station and the World Trade Center, with an intermediate stop at Fan Pier. Part of the construction is being coordinated with the Central Artery highway project. South Station serves the existing MBTA Red Line, as well as Amtrak and commuter rail and bus service. The total estimated cost of Phase I is $601.00 million. Phase II would extend the transitway to Boylston Station on the Green Line and the Chinatown Station on the Orange Line.

Section 3035(j) of ISTEA directed FTA to enter into an FFGA for this project. On November 5, 1994, an FFGA was issued for Phase 1, committing a total of $330.73 million in §5309 new starts funding. Through FY 1999, a total of $241.88 million has been provided for this project. The FY 2000 appropriation provided an additional $52.88 million. This leaves $35.97 million required to complete the Federal commitment to this project. It is recommended that these remaining funds be provided in FY 2001 to complete the FFGA. This phase of the transitway is expected to open in December 2002.

Dallas/North Central LRT Extension

Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) is constructing a 12.5-mile, 9-station extension of its light rail system from the Park Lane Station north to the City of Plano. DART estimates that approximately 17,000 riders will use this extension by 2020, of which 6,800 will be new riders. The total cost of this project is estimated at $517.20 million. DART began contracting for construction and purchasing vehicles and necessary right-of-way in May 1998, and expects to open the North Central extension for revenue service in December 2003. The first new starts project to be issued an FFGA under the TEA-21 criteria, this project has received a "high" financial rating and is rated "medium" for justification, resulting in an overall project rating of "recommended."

The North Central extension is authorized for final design and construction under Section 3030(a)(20) of TEA-21. FTA issued an FFGA for this project on November 5, 1999, which will provide a total of $333.00 million in §5309 new starts funding. Through FY 1999, a total of $43.21 million has been provided to this project, with an additional $49.05 million appropriated in FY 2000. This leaves $240.73 million required to complete the Federal funding commitment. As specified in Attachment 6 of the FFGA for this project, it is recommended that $70.00 million be provided to this project in FY 2001, with the remaining $170.73 million to be provided in future years.

Denver/Southwest Corridor LRT

The Regional Transit District (RTD) in Denver is constructing an 8.7-mile light rail extension between Denver and Littleton. The line extends from the I-25/Broadway station on the existing Central Corridor line south to Mineral Avenue in Littleton, running parallel to Santa Fe Drive over an exclusive, grade-separated right-of-way. The total cost of this project is $176.32 million. This extension is expected to serve 8,400 daily passengers when it opens for revenue service in July 2000, with an estimated 22,000 daily riders by 2015.

FTA issued an FFGA for this project on May 9, 1996, which will provide a total of $120.00 million in §5309 new starts funding. Through FY 1999, a total of $65.46 million has been provided to this project, with an additional $34.34 million appropriated in FY 2000. This leaves $20.20 million required to complete the Federal funding commitment. It is recommended that these remaining funds be provided in FY 2001 to complete the FFGA.

Houston/Regional Bus Plan

Houston Metro’s $625.00 million Regional Bus Plan consists of a package of improvements to its existing bus system. The package includes service expansions in most of the region, new and extended HOV (High-Occupancy Vehicle, or "carpool") facilities and ramps, new buses, several transit centers and park-and-ride lots, and supporting facilities. This collection of projects was selected as the locally-preferred alternative over a proposed rail project in 1992.

An FFGA was issued on December 30, 1994, to provide a total of $500.00 million in §5309 new starts funds for the Regional Bus project. A total of $437.50 million has been provided through FY 1999; the FY 2000 appropriation provided an additional $51.77 million. The FY 2001 budget recommends that the remaining $10.74 million required to fulfill the Federal commitment be provided to this project. All projects under the Regional Bus Plan are expected to be completed by December 2004.

Los Angeles/North Hollywood

The Metro Rail Red Line Project in Los Angeles is being planned, programmed and constructed in phases, through a series of "Minimum Operable Segments" (MOSs). The first of these segments (MOS-1), a 4.4-mile, 5-station segment, opened for revenue service in January 1993. A 2.1-mile, three-station segment of MOS-2 opened along Wilshire Boulevard in July 1996; an additional 4.6-mile, 5-station segment of MOS-2 opened in June 1999, and the Federal funding commitment has been fulfilled. On May 14, 1993, an FFGA was issued to the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (LACMTA) for the third construction phase, MOS-3.

MOS-3 was defined under ISTEA (Section 3034) to include three segments: the North Hollywood segment, a 6.3-mile, three-station subway extension of the Hollywood branch of MOS-2 to North Hollywood through the Santa Monica mountains; the Mid-City segment, a 2.3-mile, two-station western extension of the Wilshire Boulevard branch; and an undefined segment of the Eastside project, to the east from the existing Red Line terminus at Union Station. LACMTA later defined this eastern segment as a 3.7-mile, four-station extension under the Los Angeles River to First and Leona in East Los Angeles. On December 28, 1994, the FFGA for MOS-3 was amended to include this definition of the eastern segment, bringing the total commitment of Federal new starts funds for MOS-3 to $1,416.49 million.

In January 1997, FTA requested that the MTA submit a recovery plan to demonstrate its ability to complete MOS-2 and MOS-3, while maintaining and operating the existing bus system. On January 14, 1998, the LACMTA Board of Directors voted to suspend and demobilize construction on all rail projects other than MOS-2 and MOS-3 North Hollywood Extension. The MTA submitted a recovery plan to FTA on May 15, 1998, which was approved by FTA on July 2, 1998.

In 1998, the MTA undertook a Regional Transportation Alternatives Analysis (RTAA) to analyze and evaluate feasible alternatives for the Eastside and Mid-City corridors. The RTAA addressed system investment priorities, allocation of resources to operate existing transit services at a reliable standard, assessment and management of financial risk, countywide bus service expansion, and a process for finalizing corridor investments. On November 9, 1998, the LACMTA Board reviewed the RTAA and directed staff to reprogram resources previously allocated to the Eastside and Mid-City Extensions to the implementation of RTAA recommendations, including the LACMTA Accelerated Bus Procurement Plan. The MTA is currently conducting further studies of transit investment options in the Eastside and Mid-City corridors, and is likely to announce recommendations in early 2000. Once the MTA identifies viable projects in these corridors, FTA will consider the prior Federal commitment under the MOS-3 FFGA as an "other factor" for rating and evaluation purposes, as long as the identified projects otherwise meet the requirements of the new starts program.

On June 9, 1997, FTA and LACMTA negotiated a revised FFGA covering the North Hollywood segment (Phase 1-A) of MOS-3, which is proceeding as scheduled and will open in May 2000. The total capital cost of the North Hollywood project is estimated at $1,310.82 million, of which the revised FFGA commits $681.04 million in §5309 new starts funds. Through FY 2000, a total of $581.82 million has been appropriated for the North Hollywood segment of MOS-3, leaving $99.22 million remaining to complete the commitment under the revised FFGA for this project. It is recommended that $50.00 million be provided to the North Hollywood segment of MOS-3, as specified in the FFGA, with the remaining $49.22 million to be provided in future years.

In terms of the original FFGA for the three MOS-3 segments, a total of $76.48 million was appropriated for the original Mid-City and Eastside segments through FY 2000, with another $11.86 million was provided in FY 1999 and FY 2000 for further study of alternatives to these segments. This is in addition to the $581.82 million provided to the North Hollywood segment, which brings total appropriations to date for the original MOS-3 project to $670.16 million, leaving $746.33 million of the original MOS-3 FFGA commitment remaining.

Maryland/MARC Extension to Frederick

The Mass Transit Administration of Maryland (MTA) is extending the Maryland Commuter Rail (MARC) system from Point of Rocks to Frederick, Maryland. This extension will provide service from suburban Montgomery and Frederick counties to Baltimore, Maryland and Washington, D.C. The project involves track, signal, and station and yard improvements along an existing freight line. In addition, MTA is embarking on a major procurement of additional commuter rail coaches and locomotives needed to meet anticipated systemwide demand on the MARC system and provide service on this extension. The total cost of the project is estimated at $131.60 million. Manufacturing of the coaches is underway, and delivery has begun. The locomotive procurement is being undertaken jointly with Amtrak. Protracted negotiations with CSXT over right-of-way purchase terms have resulted in project delays; MTA now expects to begin MARC service on the Frederick extension by 2001.

An FFGA for the Frederick extension and system improvements was issued on June 19, 1995, committing a total of $105.25 million to complete the project. This does not include $33.26 million in FY 1994 and prior year funding appropriated before the FFGA, which brings total Federal funding for this project to $138.51 million. Through FY 1999, a total of $137.80 million has been appropriated for this project. The FY 2000 appropriation provided an additional $689,701, completing the Federal commitment to this project under the original FFGA. Therefore, no additional funding for this project is required in FY 2001.

Northern New Jersey/Hudson-Bergen MOS-1

The New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) is constructing a 9.6-mile, 16-station light rail line along the Hudson River Waterfront in Hudson County, from the Hoboken Terminal to 34th Street in Bayonne and Westside Avenue in Jersey City. This line is intended as the initial minimum operable segment (MOS-1) of a larger 21-mile, 30-station line extending from the Vince Lombardi park-and-ride lot in Bergen County to Bayonne, passing through Port Imperial in Weehauken, Hoboken, and Jersey City. The core of the completed system will serve the high-density commercial centers in Jersey City and Hoboken, and provide connections with NJ Transit commuter rail service, PATH trains to Newark and Manhattan, and the Port Imperial ferry from Weehauken to Manhattan. This initial operating segment is being constructed under a turnkey contract to design, build, operate, and maintain the system, which was awarded in October 1996. Total costs are expected to be $992.14 million for MOS-1; construction began in December 1996.

The entire Hudson-Bergen project is a major component of the Urban Core program of interrelated projects defined in ISTEA and TEA-21, designed to enhance mobility significantly in the Northeastern New Jersey area. These projects were specifically exempt from the FTA new starts evaluation criteria by ISTEA, and again by TEA-21.

The Department issued an FFGA on October 15, 1996 that commits $604.09 million in §5309 new starts funding for MOS-1. Through FY 1999, a total of $228.30 million has been appropriated for this project. The FY 2000 appropriation provided an additional $97.13 million, leaving $278.66 million needed to complete the Federal commitment. It is recommended that $121.00 million be provided in FY 2001, in accordance with Attachment 6 of the FFGA for this project. The remaining $157.66 million needed to complete the Federal funding commitment would be provided in future years. This project is scheduled to open for revenue service in July 2000.

Portland/Westside-Hillsboro LRT

On September 12, 1998 the Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District (Tri-Met) in Portland, Oregon officially opened the 17.7-mile extension of the MAX light rail system between downtown Portland and downtown Hillsboro. The total cost of this project was $963.52 million. This line includes 20 new stations and nine park-and-ride lots. The route includes a 3-mile twin-tube tunnel under the West Hills, essentially paralleling the Sunset Highway. Service is provided by 42 low-floor light rail vehicles, the first to be placed in service in the United States.

The original FFGA for this project was issued in September 1992, for an 11.7-mile segment to S.W. 185th Avenue in Washington County, and was amended in December 1994 to include the remaining 6-mile segment to Hillsboro. Consistent with Congressional authorization, it was amended again on November 1, 1996 to commit a total of $630.06 million in §5309 new starts funding to the entire "Westside-Hillsboro" project. Of this, $619.01 million has been provided in FY 1999 and prior years. The FY 2000 appropriation provided an additional $10.85 million, leaving $210,000 required to complete the Federal commitment to this project. It is recommended that this final funding increment be provided in FY 2001.

Sacramento/South LRT Extension

The Sacramento Regional Transit District (RT) is developing an 11.3-mile light rail project in the South Sacramento Corridor. The system will follow existing Union Pacific right-of-way from downtown Sacramento to Calvine/Auberry. To maximize the use of available State and local capital funds, RT will implement this project in several phases. The first phase, a 6.3-mile minimum operable segment (MOS), would operate between downtown Sacramento and Meadowview Road. Population and employment in this corridor are expected to grow at rates faster than the regional average, resulting in severe congestion on the two major highways in the corridor. The total estimated capital cost of the MOS is estimated at $222.00 million. Final design activities commenced on July 1, 1997, and construction began in November 1999. The project is projected to open for revenue service by September 2003.

On June 20, 1997, an FFGA was issued for the 6.3-mile MOS, committing a total of $111.20 million in Federal new starts funding. This does not include $1.98 million in prior year funds that were obligated before the FFGA was issued, which brings the total amount of §5309 new starts funding to $113.18 million. A total of $53.46 million in FY 1999 and prior year funding has been allocated to this project. An additional $24.53 million was appropriated in FY 2000, leaving $35.20 million required to complete the Federal commitment to this project. It is recommended that these remaining funds be provided in FY 2001 to fulfill the terms of the FFGA.

Salt Lake City/North-South LRT

The Utah Transit Authority (UTA) has completed construction of a 15-mile light rail transit (LRT) line from downtown Salt Lake City to the southern suburbs. The line opened for regular weekday service on December 6, 1999. The system operates on city streets downtown (2 miles) and then follows a lightly-used railroad alignment owned by UTA to the suburban community of Sandy (13 miles). This project is one component of the Interstate 15 corridor improvement initiative, which includes reconstruction of a parallel segment of I-15. Though original ridership projections for the South LRT system estimated daily ridership at 14,000 daily passengers in 2000 and 23,000 passengers by 2010, current ridership has already exceeded 26,000 weekday passengers. Total capital costs for this project were $312.49 million.

Salt Lake City has been selected as the site for the 2002 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games. This project will connect major hotels and local residential areas with the Olympic venues for figure skating, medal rounds for ice hockey, and the International Broadcast Center, and will connect with bus service to venues for speed skating, curling, and the Nordic alpine events.

On August 2, 1995, FTA issued an FFGA for this project that commits a total of $237.39 million in Federal new starts funding. This does not include $6.60 million in prior year funds that were provided before the FFGA was issued, which brings the total amount of §5309 new starts funding to $243.99 million. A total of $206.07 million has been appropriated in FY 1999 and prior years. The FY 2000 appropriation provided an additional $37.21 million for this project, leaving $720,000 needed to complete the Federal commitment. The FY 2001 budget recommends that these remaining funds be provided to fulfill the terms of the FFGA for this project.

San Francisco/BART Extension to SFO Airport

Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) in San Francisco and the San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans) are constructing an 8.2-mile, 4-station extension of the BART rapid transit system to serve San Francisco International Airport (SFO). The project consists of a 7.4-mile mainline extension from the existing BART station at Colma, through Colma, south San Francisco, and San Bruno, terminating at the Millbrae Avenue BART/CalTrain Station. An additional 0.8-mile spur from the main line north of Millbrae will take BART trains directly into the airport, to a station adjoining the new International Terminal.

The San Francisco International Airport is a major partner in this project. All structures and facilities to be constructed on airport property, and installation of related equipment, are being funded, designed and constructed by the airport for BART. This project is also part of the FTA Turnkey Demonstration program to determine if the design/build approach will reduce implementation time and cost. On July 24, 1997, the first contract was awarded for site preparation and utility relocation associated with this project. Bids for the main contract for construction of the line, trackwork and related systems were opened on November 25, 1997.

On June 30, 1997, FTA entered into an FFGA for the BART-SFO extension, committing a total of $750.00 million in Federal new starts funds to the project; total capital costs at that time were estimated at $1,054.00 million. The total cost has since increased to an estimated $1,510.20 million; a recent surge in local construction activity has resulted in higher than estimated costs for construction of this project. Per the terms of the FFGA, any cost increases are the responsibility of the local project sponsors. Thus, the original Federal commitment is unchanged at $750.00 million. Through FY 1999, a total of $153.42 million has been allocated to this project. An additional $63.77 million was provided in FY 2000, leaving $532.81 million of the total commitment remaining. In accordance with Attachment 6 of the FFGA for this project, it is recommended that $80.00 million be provided in the FY 2001 budget to keep this project progressing on schedule. The remaining $452.81 million would be provided in future years. This extension is expected to open for service by July 1, 2002.

San Jose/Tasman West LRT

The Santa Clara County Transit District (SCCTD) is planning a 12.4-mile light rail system from northeast San Jose to downtown Mountain View, connecting with both the Guadalupe LRT in northern Santa Clara County and the Caltrain commuter rail system. The project is proceeding in two phases: the Phase 1 West Extension will connect the northern terminus of the Guadalupe Light Rail System in Santa Clara with the Caltrain Commuter Rail station in downtown Mountain View, a distance of 7.6 miles; the future Phase 2 East Extension will complete the remaining 4.8 miles. The total capital cost of the Phase 1 West project was $325.00 million.

Construction is complete and the Phase I West Extension opened for revenue service on December 17, 1999, a year ahead of schedule. The Phase II East Extension is being funded with State and local funds.

An FFGA was issued for Phase 1of this project on July 2, 1996, providing a total of $182.75 million in §5309 new starts funding. A total of $150.88 million was provided in FY 1999 and prior years, and an additional $19.62 million was provided in FY 2000. This leaves $12.25 million needed to complete the Federal commitment to this project. It is recommended that these remaining funds be provided in FY 2001.

San Juan/Tren Urbano

The Puerto Rico Department of Transportation and Public Works (DTPW) is constructing a 10.7-mile, 16-station rapid rail line between Bayamon Centro and the Sagrado Corazon area of Santurce in the San Juan metropolitan area. The system consists of a double-track line operating over at-grade and elevated rights-of-way with a short below-grade segment, and a maintenance facility. When complete, this system is expected to carry 113,300 riders per day by 2010.

This project has been selected as one of FTA's turnkey demonstration projects, which incorporates contracts to design, build, operate, and maintain the system. This type of procurement is expected to expedite the implementation of the project and develop the institutional capability needed to operate the system. During 1996 and 1997, seven contracts were awarded under the turnkey procurement. The total capital cost of this project is now estimated at $1,653.00 million.

On March 13, 1996, FTA entered into an FFGA committing $307.41 million in §5309 new starts funds to this project, out of a total project cost of $1,250.00 million. This did not include $4.96 million in Federal new starts funding provided prior to FY 1996, which brings total Federal new starts funding for this project to $312.37 million. This FFGA was amended in July 1999 to include two additional stations and 10 additional railcars. This amendment included $141.00 million in §5307 funds and $259.90 million in flexible funding; no additional §5309 new starts funds were committed. A total of $53.23 million in §5309 funds has been allocated to the Tren Urbano project in FY 1999 and prior years, and an additional $31.39 million was appropriated in FY 2000. This leaves $227.74 million needed to complete the FFGA. In accordance with Attachment 6 of the FFGA, it is recommended that $118.00 million be provided to this project in FY 2001, with the remaining $109.74 million to be provided in future years.

St. Louis/Metrolink St. Clair Extension

The Bi-State Development Agency (Bi-State) is developing a 26-mile extension of the Metrolink light rail line from downtown East St. Louis, Illinois to the Mid America Airport in St. Clair County. A 17.4-mile Minimum Operable Segment (MOS) will extend from the current Metrolink terminal in downtown East St. Louis to Belleville Area College. This segment consists of eight stations, seven park-and-ride lots, 20 new light rail vehicles, and a new maintenance facility in East St. Louis. The route makes extensive use of abandoned railroad rights-of-way. Right-of-way and real estate acquisition is proceeding as scheduled, and revenue service is scheduled to begin in May 2001. The total cost of this project is estimated at $339.20 million.

On October 17, 1996, FTA and Bi-State entered into an FFGA that commits a total of $243.93 million in §5309 new starts funding to complete the 17.4-mile MOS. This does not include $8.49 million in Federal new starts funding provided prior to FY 1996, which brings total Federal funding for this project to $252.41 million under the new starts program. Through FY 1999, a total of $112.83 million has been appropriated for this project. The FY 2000 appropriation provided an additional $49.05 million, leaving $90.53 million needed to fulfill the original Federal funding commitment. In accordance with the FFGA, it is recommended that $60.00 million be provided to this project in FY 2001, with the remaining $30.53 million to be provided in future years.