Appendix A Listing 4

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Burlington - Gloucester Corridor

Southern New Jersey

(November 1, 1995)


Description

New Jersey Transit, in cooperation with the Delaware River Port Authority and the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission, is studying several rail and bus alternatives in a 36-mile corridor. The corridor extends from Glassboro in Gloucester County to Mount Holly in Burlington County by way of Camden, where it would either cross or join the existing Lindenwold Line. Several alternative technologies are being considered ranging from at-grade light rail to grade-separated heavy rail compatible with the existing Lindenwold Line. The alternatives would operate within abandoned or existing rail rights-of-way or Interstate highway medians. Preliminary cost estimates indicate that capital costs for the longest heavy rail alternatives could be between $1.4 billion and $1.5 billion (1995 dollars). Preliminary cost estimates also indicate that capital costs for the longest light rail alternatives could be $1.4 billion (1995 dollars).

Status

In March 1994, NJ Transit received federal funds in the amount of $1,800,000 to conduct a Major Investment Study (MIS) for the Burlington and Gloucester Corridors. The study will generate information on the costs and benefits of the alternatives and will lead to the selection of a locally preferred alternative and a financing plan. It is anticipated that the study will be completed is early 1996.

This project is not authorized in ISTEA. In FY 1995, $1.5 million was appropriated.

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Hawthorne-Warwick Corridor

Northern New Jersey/New York

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) has proposed the restoration of commuter rail service on the New York, Susquehanna & Western (NYS&W) rail line, possibly as far as Warwick, N.Y. The service would connect to the New Jersey Transit's Main Line at Hawthorne, New Jersey, where trains would connect to Hoboken. The project would includes track and signal improvements, new stations and parking facilities, equipment acquisition and rehabilitation of the Patterson (N.J.) Station on the NJ Transit main Line.

Status

Section 3035(a) of ISTEA directed FTA to negotiate and sign a multiyear grant agreement with NJ Transit for $46.9 million. The agreement would cover the construction of this project. Through FY 1996, Congress appropriated $46.8 million in New Start funds, of which $17.1 million was rescinded in FY 1995.

A $1.5 million planning study is underway which includes conceptual design of the NYS&W line, an environmental assessment, capital cost estimates and preliminary design and engineering of the Patterson station upgrade project. The study is expected to be completed in the spring of 1996.

In September 1995, FTA awarded a $6.6 million grant amendment which brings the total Federal funding up to $8.2 million. These funds will support the continuation of the operation analysis and environmental assessment effort now in progress, the initiation of signal and communication system planning, a more extensive public outreach and community involvement program, and preliminary engineering and design for the Patterson station upgrade, which includes accessibility improvements associated with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Information on local financial commitment, mobility improvements, cost effectiveness, environmental benefits and operating efficiencies is being developed in the planning study.

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Hudson-Bergen Waterfront Light Rail Transit System

Northern New Jersey

(April 1, 1996)


Description

The New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) is proposing a light rail transit line along the Hudson River waterfront in Hudson County. The full project is a 20.5-mile, 33-station at-grade LRT line from the Vince Lombardi Park-and-Ride lot in Bergen County to Bayonne. The project passes through Port Imperial in Weehauken, Hoboken and Jersey City. The outer ends would provide 8,800 park-and-ride spaces. The core of the system would serve the high density commercial and residential centers in Jersey City and Hoboken and connect to ferries, PATH, and NJ Transit commuter rail lines. A 10-mile "initial operating segment" would connect the Hoboken Terminal to 34th Street Bayonne and Westside Avenue in Jersey City.

The 20.5-mile system is expected to cost $1.3 billion (escalated dollars) and to carry 81,448 riders per day. The initial operating segment is expected to cost $623.9 million and to carry 31,275 riders per day.


Status

Section 3031 of ISTEA directed FTA to negotiate and enter into a full funding grant agreement providing no less than $634.4 million for those elements of the New Jersey Urban Core Project which can be fully funded in FY 1992 through FY 1997. The Hudson-Bergen LRT project is one of eight elements eligible for funding. In fiscal years 1992 through 1996, Congress appropriated $408.4 million for the Urban Core Project.

In February 1993, NJ Transit selected, as its locally preferred alternative, a 15.3-mile, 26-station at-grade LRT line from the Vince Lombardi Park-and-Ride lot through Hoboken and Jersey City to Route 440 in Southwest Jersey City. Later in 1993, NJ Transit added a 5.2-mile, 7-station extension to southern Bayonne.

In mid-1993 NJ Transit initiated preliminary engineering and completion of the environmental documentation process. A supplemental draft EIS for the downtown Jersey City section of the project has been distributed for comment. Review of the final EIS is expected to be completed in the summer of 1996 with a Record of Decision (ROD) anticipated by the Fall, 1996.

NJ Transit is using a turnkey procurement to implement the project. A solicitation for proposals to design/build/operate/maintain was issued in November 1995. Possible opportunities for equity participation by the successful proposer will be identified during this process.


Justification

Section 3031(c) of ISTEA specifically exempted the Urban Core Project from the New Starts project justification criteria.

Mobility Improvements. The project would provide fixed guideway transit service to existing and proposed new developments along the New Jersey waterfront. It would provide internal transit circulation along the waterfront, and would connect with NJ Transit Commuter Rail service at Hoboken, with PATH trains to Newark and Manhattan, and with the Port Imperial Ferry from Weehauken to Manhattan. Park and ride lots in Jersey City and Bayonne would intercept drivers bound for the new offices on the NJ side of the Hudson who are presently caught in tunnel traffic.

The original project (without the Bayonne extension) was estimated to save almost 22,000 hours of travel time daily over the TSM alternative.



Cost Effectiveness. The cost effectiveness index for the full build system is $11 per new rider.


Environmental Benefits. Northern New Jersey is a "severe" nonattainment area for ozone and a "moderate" nonattainment area for carbon monoxide. FTA does not have information specifically on the impact of the full 20.5-mile project on regional air quality. However, the initial operating segment is expected to reduce daily emissions by about 0.3 percent in the study area and the full project would reduce emissions by approximately double that amount.


Operating Efficiencies. FTA does not have information on how the project would affect NJ Transit's operating cost per passenger. The LRT line would be a small fraction of the overall NJ Transit system and should have minimal impacts. Operation by a turnkey contractor may improve efficiency.
Local
Financial
Commitment

The Section 5309 New Start share is expected to be $623.9 million, or about 50 percent of the total project cost. The financial plan has not been finalized and depends on the outcome of the turnkey procurement process. The plan is expected to involve a combination of state and private capital and will reflect substantial input from the successful turnkey vendor. State funds would be derived from the State Transportation Trust Fund. As provided in Section 3031(b) of ISTEA, NJ Transit may use locally funded projects such as the Kearny and Waterfront Connections, and New Jersey Turnpike projects, as local match for the Hudson Bergen LRT and other Urban Core projects.

The capital finance plan has been rated "low-medium", considering the number of uncertainties in the plan at this stage. NJ Transit's five year capital program (1996-2000) anticipates a total expenditure of $400 million ($80 million per year) on the Hudson-Bergen Line. The program anticipates Section 5309 New Start funding of $697.3 million for this and other capital projects, or close to $140 million per year, compared with actual New Start appropriations of $79.3 million in 1996 and $106.2 million in 1995. The fourth and fifth years are overprogrammed. Nevertheless, NJ Transit has given this particular project a high priority for available funds. The uncertainties in the project's finance plan are expected to be resolved as the turnkey procurement and preliminary engineering are concluded.

The stability and reliability of operating revenues are rated "low-medium" due to the funding uncertainties for this project and the possibility of unfunded deficits for the system. The selected turnkey contractor will operate and maintain this project but the cost to NJ Transit is unknown at this time. NJ Transit's overall operating expenses are projected to increase by 10.7 percent by 1999 while revenues are projected to be essentially unchanged, leading to a deficit that could reach $79 million in 1999. In response, NJ Transit has undertaken a cost cutting program, utilizing innovative strategies such as cross-border leasing, that has led to an operating surplus. Transit service levels are being maintained. In 1994, the average vehicle age of NJ Transit's bus fleet was 9.8 years, which is slightly higher than the national average. The average age of the rail fleet is 15.8 years.



Proposed
Source of Funds
Total Funding ($million)


Federal:



Section 5309 New Start $623.90 ($108.99 million appropriated through FY 1996)


Section 5307 Formula NA

State: NA

Local: NA


TOTAL $1,300.00


NOTE: Funding proposal reflects assumptions made by project sponsors, and are not DOT or FTA assumptions.

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Lakewood-Freehold-Matawan or Jamesburg Corridor

Northern New Jersey

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) is studying transit improvement options between Lakewood and Newark. The three counties traversed by the route are among the fastest growing in the State of New Jersey. Several alignment possibilities have been examined and the options have been narrowed to diesel powered commuter rail on two rail alignments and an enhanced bus system.

Status

Section 3035(p) of ISTEA directed FTA to negotiate and sign a multiyear grant agreement for $1.8 million in FY 1992 and $3 million in both FY 1993 and FY 1994 for alternatives analysis, preliminary engineering and the environmental impact statement. In FY 1992-1994, a total of $7.8 million was appropriated.

In FY 1993, a $1.8 million grant was awarded to begin a Major Investment Study (MIS) and preparation of a draft EIS. A preferred alternative is expected to be selected by early 1996. In FY 1995, a $5.9 million grant was awarded to support the development of the draft EIS for the locally preferred alternative that is expected to result from the MIS.

Information on the local financial commitment, mobility improvements, cost effectiveness, environmental benefits and operating efficiencies is being developed in the MIS.

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Newark-Elizabeth Rail Link

Northern New Jersey

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) is proposing an

8.8-mile, 15-station light rail transit line linking Newark, Elizabeth, and Newark International Airport. The capital cost of the project is estimated to be $694 million (1995 dollars). NJ Transit predicts that the line will carry 24,900 riders per day in 2015.

A 2-mile "initial operating segment" (IOS) from Broad Street Station to Newark Penn Station is estimated to cost $141 million (1995 dollars), including associated stations, vehicles and yard. The IOS is predicted to carry 13,200 riders per day in 2015.


Status

Section 3031 of ISTEA directed FTA to negotiate and enter into a full funding grant agreement providing no less than $634.4 million for those elements of the New Jersey Urban Core Project which can be fully funded in FY 1992 through FY 1997. The Newark-Elizabeth project is one of eight elements eligible for funding. In fiscal years 1992 through 1996, Congress appropriated $408.4 million for the Urban Core Project.

The Newark-Elizabeth Rail Link is in the preliminary engineering phase of project development. The final alignment is under evaluation as part of the preliminary engineering efforts. The project is being advanced in two parts with separate environmental documents: one part involves extending the existing freight railroad right-of-way to a new maintenance facility at the "uptown" end, the other is a new LRT line from downtown Newark to Elizabeth. Draft environmental documents are in preparation. Preliminary engineering and the environmental process could be completed by the end of 1996.


Justification

Under Section 3031(c) of ISTEA, the Urban Core Project is exempt from the New Start criteria.

Mobility Improvements: The project would improve access to the airport, transfers between commuter rail lines, access to existing and new development sites, and internal circulation in downtown Newark. Preliminary estimates indicate that the project would save over 1,300 hours of travel time daily. The initial operating segment is projected to save 800 hours daily.



Cost Effectiveness. The cost effectiveness index for the IOS is $5 per new rider (1995 dollars, 2015 ridership). For the full project, the index is $17 per new rider (1995 dollars, 2015 ridership).


Environmental Benefits. Northern New Jersey is a "severe" nonattainment area for ozone and a "moderate" nonattainment area for carbon monoxide. The impact of the proposed project on regional air quality has not yet been determined.


Operating Efficiencies. FTA does not have information on how the project would affect NJ Transit's operating cost per passenger.
Local
Financial
Commitment

A financial plan has not been completed. The plan is expected to involve a combination of FTA and state funds, with the exact mix to be determined in the course of preliminary engineering. As provided in Section 3031(b) of ISTEA, NJ Transit may use locally funded projects such as the Kearny and Waterfront Connections, and New Jersey Turnpike projects as local match for the Newark Elizabeth Rail Link and other Urban Core projects.

The capital finance plan is rated "low" due to the lack of a financial plan. NJ Transit's Five Year Capital Plan (1996-2000) does not anticipate any funding for the project during the program period. The Five Year Capital Plan anticipates Section 5309 New Start funding of $697.3 million, or close to $140 million per year on average, for other projects. This compares with actual appropriations of $79.3 million in 1996 and $106.2 million in 1995. The fourth and fifth years of the Plan have been overprogrammed by 30 percent, meaning that some of the programmed projects may not be fundable.

The stability and reliability of operating assistance are rated "low" due to the lack of a finance plan for this project and the possibility of unfunded operating deficits for the system. NJ Transit's overall operating expenses are projected to increase by 10.7 percent by 1999 while revenues are projected to be essentially unchanged, leading to a deficit that could reach $79 million in 1999. In response, NJ Transit has undertaken a cost cutting program, utilizing innovative strategies such as cross-border leasing, that have led to an operating surplus. Transit service levels are being maintained. In 1994 the average vehicle age of NJ Transit's bus fleet was 9.8 years, which is slightly higher than the national average. The average age of the rail fleet is 15.8 years.


Proposed
Source of Funds
Total Funding ($million)


Federal:



Section 5309 New Start NA ($11.95 million appropriated
through FY 1996)


Section 5307 Formula NA


Flexible Funds NA

State: NA

Local: NA


TOTAL $694.00


NOTE: Funding proposal reflects assumptions made by project sponsors, and are not DOT or FTA assumptions.


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Secaucus Transfer Station

Northern New Jersey

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) is constructing a major commuter rail transfer station in Secaucus where its Main, Bergen and Pascack Valley Lines intersect the Northeast Corridor (NEC) Line. Passengers on the Main, Bergen, Pascack Valley and Port Jervis lines can transfer to the NEC for more direct rail service to Midtown Manhattan via Penn Station NY and southern New Jersey via Penn Station Newark. Located in the New Jersey Meadowlands, the project is being constructed as part of a potential public/private partnership which would include the development of a major commercial center.

The Secaucus Transfer Station (STS) project includes construction of a three-level 200,000 square foot transfer station at the intersection of the NEC, Main and Bergen lines. The station foundations and structural system will support the commercial development over the station which may occur in the future. It also includes modification of 2 miles of the NEC from two to four tracks with improved signal, power and communication systems. Similar upgrading of tracks and bridges on the Bergen-Main Lines near the new station are also included. The STS is estimated to cost $444.26 million.


Status

Section 3031 of ISTEA directed FTA to consider non-Federal contributions to the capital cost of the NJ Urban Core Project made since 1987 as required local matching funds for the project. In addition, Section 1044 of ISTEA allows certain highway toll revenues which are reinvested in building or maintaining the highway system to be credited as local matching funds for any Federally assisted highway or transit project. Sufficient non-Federal funds to constitute local match for the STS, in accordance with Sections 1044 and 3031 of ISTEA, have already been expended.

ISTEA identifies the STS as one element of the New Jersey Urban Core Project which includes seven other major elements, and requires FTA to enter into a full funding grant agreement (FFGA) for those elements which can be fully funded in FY 1992 through FY 1997. The total amount of New Start funds authorized by ISTEA for the NJ Urban Core Project is $634.40 million.

FTA signed an FFGA with NJ Transit in December 1994 for construction of the STS. NJ Transit began construction immediately with revenue operations scheduled for 2002.

The FFGA sets the New Start contribution to the STS at $444.26 million, which is 99 percent of its cost, and identifies the specific expenditures by NJ Transit that constitute local matching funds for the STS.


Source of Funds
Total Funding ($million)



Federal:



Section 5309 New Start
FFGA Amount
444.26 ($312.47 million appropriated through FY 1996)

Local: 0.00


TOTAL 444.26

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West Shore Corridor

Northern New Jersey/New York

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJ Transit) is conducting a planning study for the West Shore Corridor between Hoboken, New Jersey and either West Nyack, New York or West Haverstraw, New York. The corridor includes the former West Shore rail line (now known as Conrail's River Line) and is 29 to 38 miles in length.

Status

A 1993 planning study proposed commuter rail service from Hoboken and the Secaucus Transfer station to West Nyack, NY. Rockland County, NY officials suggested that the line be extended farther north to West Haverstraw. In June 1995, FTA awarded $4.0 million for a Major Investment Study and a draft EIS for the West Shore Rail Corridor. The purpose of the MIS is to look at commuter rail, light rail, highway, and transportation systems management alternatives for improving mobility for commuters in the corridor. This MIS will result in the selection of a preferred alternative and a financing plan. The study will also produce information FTA can use to evaluate the resulting project.

Through FY 1996, Congress has appropriated $4.0 million to support this project.

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Norfolk-Virginia Beach Corridor

Norfolk, Virginia

(November 1, 1995)


Description

Tidewater Regional Transit (TRT) is evaluating transit/transportation improvements in the 30-mile corridor extending from downtown Norfolk and the Norfolk Naval Base to Virginia Beach. Alternatives being considered include No Build, Congestion Management System, Enhanced Bus, and Light Rail Transit. Potential economic development opportunities along the alignment and mobility for transit dependent populations are important issues in the corridor.

Status

TRT is conducting a Major Investment Study (MIS) of the Norfolk - Virginia Beach Corridor. The next phase of the MIS is to perform detailed analysis and evaluation of the four alternatives in terms of ridership, mobility improvements, cost effectiveness, environmental benefits, etc. The evaluation of the alternatives is expected to be completed in February 1996, followed by the selection of a preferred alternative by June 1996.

Congress has not authorized or appropriated funds for this corridor.

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Queens Connector

New York, New York

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The Queens Boulevard Connection will relieve severe overcrowding on the Queens Boulevard subway line's existing 53rd Street Tunnel bottleneck by providing service through the 63rd Street Tunnel. This will allow an additional 15 trains per hour to be run between Manhattan and Queens. Approximately 1/3 of the 60,000 peak hour passengers currently using the 53rd St Tunnel are expected to transfer to this new route. Construction will include about 1/3 mile of new tunnel, a significant amount of track and signal work, real estate acquisition and design at a total cost of $645 million.

Status

Section 3033 of ISTEA directed FTA to negotiate and enter into a full funding grant agreement (FFGA) in the amount of $306.1 million for the elements of the Queens Boulevard Connection which can be fully funded in FY 1992 through FY 1996. Through FY 1996, $271.08 million in Section 5309 funds have been appropriated by Congress.

The New York City Transit Authority (NYCTA) completed the final EIS and preliminary engineering in mid-1992 and an FFGA has been signed. Construction began in July 1994, and is expected to be completed in 2001.


Source of Funds
Total Funding ($million)



Federal:



Section 5309 New Start 306.10 ($271.08 appropriated through FY 1996)


Flexible Funds $22.68

Local: $316.22


TOTAL $645.00

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Staten Island-Midtown Manhattan Ferry Service

New York, New York

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) has proposed construction of terminals and initiating high speed ferry service between Staten Island and Midtown Manhattan. The service would be provided by privately owned and operated ferries without public operating subsidies. The estimated cost of this project is $12.6 million. The estimated ridership is 4,800 per day.

Status

Section 3035(d) of ISTEA directed FTA to negotiate and sign a multiyear grant agreement for $12 million to carry out capital improvements for this proposed project. Congress appropriated $1 million in FY 1992, of which $375,000 was rescinded in FY 1995..

During FY 1995, FTA approved a grant in the amount of $250,000 for design and engineering activities only. Upon substantial completion of design and engineering, construction funding will be provided based upon availability.

NYCDOT has selected an operator of this service. The operator has agreed to procure all vessels at its own expense and to provide the ferry service without operating subsidies. NYCDOT will provide a landing facility at the St. George Ferry Terminal on Staten Island by upgrading an unused slip using FTA funds. NYCDOT and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey have initiated the process of hiring a design consultant for this work. Ferry service is scheduled to begin in the summer of 1996 using existing terminals on an interim basis until upgraded slips are available in December of 1996.


Justification

Since the proposed Section 5309 share is less than $25 million, this proposal is not subject to the new start criteria in 49 U.S.C. Section 5309(e)(2)-(7).
Local
Financial
Commitment

The project, especially its initial $1 million modification of an existing Staten Island ferry slip, would have a very small impact on the city's overall budget, especially since the city expects all operating expenses to be covered by the future private operator. At the present time NYCDOT has not established a capital financing plan for this project. The private operator is paying for the purchase of three catamarans and the operating costs. The balance of the $11 million would pay for new landing facility in Manhattan.

In 1995, the average age of ferry boats operated by the New York City DOT was 19.4 years. Three of the older ferries are in need of replacement.

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Whitehall Ferry Terminal

New York, New York

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The New York City Department of Transportation and the New York City Economic Development Corporation have proposed the redesign and reconstruction of the Staten Island Ferry's Whitehall terminal in downtown Manhattan. The terminal was largely destroyed by fire in 1991 and ferry service has been operating out of interim facilities since then. The preliminary estimate of the cost of reconstruction is approximately $80 million. Currently, 60,000 people use this terminal a day.

Status

Preliminary design will begin in March 1996. Final design is expected to begin in June 1996 and be completed by February 1998. Construction is programmed to begin in late 1998 and will take 3 years to complete.

Through FY 1996, Congress has appropriated $5.0 million.

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Northeast Ohio Commuter Rail Feasibility Study

Cleveland, Ohio

(November 1, 1995)


Description

This proposal involves commuter rail service to connect urban and suburban areas of northeastern Ohio.

Status

Section 3035(w) of ISTEA directed FTA to sign a multiyear grant agreement with the Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency (NOACA) in the amount of $1.6 million for a commuter rail feasibility study. The Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency has received a grant for $800,000 and has begun work on Phase I of the study. In this phase, NOACA is looking at existing and proposed land use patterns and impacts, preliminary ridership estimates, preliminary cost estimates, and will select potential commuter rail corridors in the Cleveland, Ohio area for further study. The first phase of study is expected to be completed in mid-1996.

Phase II, if funds are made available, will complete the analysis by assessing economic and environmental implications of a commuter rail system, as well as other transportation modes available to meet anticipated travel demand. Phase II would also include preliminary design, cost and integration with existing transit services.

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Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The Central Oklahoma Transportation and Parking Authority (COTPA) is proposing a 1.74-mile, $12.5 million vintage rail trolley circulator in downtown Oklahoma City. The project is known as the Park Avenue Rail Loop and the MAPS (Metropolitan Area Projects) Link. COTPA estimates that 630 daily riders will use this route in the year 2015.

Status

COTPA completed a major investment study for a 15-mile corridor that connects the hotel district along Meridian Avenue in southwest Oklahoma City with the downtown and the area around Remington Park Racetrack in the northeast. The preferred alternative includes the vintage trolley project in downtown, and was selected in September 1995. The trolley project is included in the regionally adopted metropolitan transportation plan and transportation improvement program. COTPA will be using Section 5307 formula funds for preliminary engineering.

Congress has not authorized or appropriated any funds for this project.


Justification

This project is exempt from the New Starts criteria since the anticipated Section 5309 federal share is less than $25 million.

Mobility Improvements. The MAPS Link is not expected to reduce travel time since it is not a peak period system. However, the project will serve the largest concentrations of office and commercial development, existing parking resources, and MAPS facilities downtown. Approximately 630 daily riders are expected to be attracted to the route.



Cost Effectiveness. The cost effectiveness index is $5 per new trip.


Environmental Benefits. Oklahoma City is classified as an attainment area for air quality. A preliminary evaluation of environmental factors indicated no negative environmental impacts.


Operating Efficiencies. The project's impact on systemwide operating cost per passenger has not been computed, but is likely to be insignificant. A cost of $1.88 per passenger trip is anticipated for the LPA.
Local
Financial
Commitment

COTPA is expected to seek a Section 5309 New Start share of $9.2 million, or 73 percent of the project's estimated capital cost. Other Federal funds would be obtained from the Section 5307 and Community Development Block Grant programs. The 20 percent local share would be derived from a voter approved, 5-year 1 percent sales tax. FTA has not rated the capital financing plan or the stability and reliability of operating revenues.




Proposed
Source of Funds
Total Funding ($million)



Federal:



Section 5309 New Start 9.20 ($0.0 million appropriated through FY 1996)


Section 5307 0.08


Community Development
Block Grant
0.72

Local: 2.50


TOTAL 12.50


NOTE: Funding proposal reflects assumptions made by project sponsors, and are not DOT or FTA assumptions.

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Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The Central Oklahoma Transportation and Parking Authority (COTPA) is proposing a 1.74-mile, $12.5 million vintage rail trolley circulator in downtown Oklahoma City. The project is known as the Park Avenue Rail Loop and the MAPS (Metropolitan Area Projects) Link. COTPA estimates that 630 daily riders will use this route in the year 2015.

Status

COTPA completed a major investment study for a 15-mile corridor that connects the hotel district along Meridian Avenue in southwest Oklahoma City with the downtown and the area around Remington Park Racetrack in the northeast. The preferred alternative includes the vintage trolley project in downtown, and was selected in September 1995. The trolley project is included in the regionally adopted metropolitan transportation plan and transportation improvement program. COTPA will be using Section 5307 formula funds for preliminary engineering.

Congress has not authorized or appropriated any funds for this project.


Justification

This project is exempt from the New Starts criteria since the anticipated Section 5309 federal share is less than $25 million.

Mobility Improvements. The MAPS Link is not expected to reduce travel time since it is not a peak period system. However, the project will serve the largest concentrations of office and commercial development, existing parking resources, and MAPS facilities downtown. Approximately 630 daily riders are expected to be attracted to the route.



Cost Effectiveness. The cost effectiveness index is $5 per new trip.


Environmental Benefits. Oklahoma City is classified as an attainment area for air quality. A preliminary evaluation of environmental factors indicated no negative environmental impacts.


Operating Efficiencies. The project's impact on systemwide operating cost per passenger has not been computed, but is likely to be insignificant. A cost of $1.88 per passenger trip is anticipated for the LPA.
Local
Financial
Commitment

COTPA is expected to seek a Section 5309 New Start share of $9.2 million, or 73 percent of the project's estimated capital cost. Other Federal funds would be obtained from the Section 5307 and Community Development Block Grant programs. The 20 percent local share would be derived from a voter approved, 5-year 1 percent sales tax. FTA has not rated the capital financing plan or the stability and reliability of operating revenues.




Proposed
Source of Funds
Total Funding ($million)



Federal:



Section 5309 New Start 9.20 ($0.0 million appropriated through FY 1996)


Section 5307 0.08


Community Development
Block Grant
0.72

Local: 2.50


TOTAL 12.50


NOTE: Funding proposal reflects assumptions made by project sponsors, and are not DOT or FTA assumptions.

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I-405/SR-55 Transitway and Direct Access HOV Ramps

Orange County, California

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The Orange County Transportation Agency (OCTA) and the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) have recently constructed HOV lanes on three Orange County freeways including I-405, SR-55, and SR-57. Construction of a joint HOV/Transitway facilities is currently taking place on I-5 and SR-91 and is scheduled to be completed by 2000. Upon completion, the 100-mile transitway/HOV network will encompass all of Orange County's major freeways, with the exception of SR-22.

As originally envisioned, the I-405/SR55 Transitway and Direct Access Ramps project consisted of the HOV/transitway connector ramps between the I-405 and SR-55 freeways, 7759 park-n ride spaces, and 361 express buses to serve six activity centers. The HOV/Transitway connectors were to include three direct off ramps between the exclusive HOV/Transit lanes to the immediate vicinity of the activity centers. The ramps would enable express buses coming from the outer sections of the county to exit directly from the freeways without weaving across the mixed mode lanes. The project was estimated to cost $528.9 million.

The original project has been scaled back. OCTA now envisions 6,735 park and ride spaces and 50 new express buses through the year 2010. Additional bus purchases are planned after 2010. The Sunflower ramp to Costa Mesa has been deleted. The scaled-back project is estimated to cost $409 million (escalated dollars).


Status

The environmental process has been completed on the original project concept. On July 16, 1994, FTA issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

On September 6, 1994, a Letter of no Prejudice was issued allowing the transit agency to incur costs for design and right-of-way activities. Final design on the South Braid Ramps will be finished in 1998 and on the North Braid about the year 2000. Construction on the South Braid may start in 1998 and North Braid in 2001. Full completion is anticipated in 2004.

The project was not authorized in ISTEA. Through FY 1996, Congress has appropriated $20.3 million.


Justification

Mobility Improvements. For the original project concept, OCTA estimated that the direct access ramps would reduce HOV travel time by approximately 4 minutes compared to the TSM alternative for an average trip. However, reduction of bus acquisitions and deletion of the Sunflower Avenue ramp reduces the transit benefits of the project. No systemwide travel time savings have been calculated for the original project concept or the scaled back project.


Cost Effectiveness. The cost effectiveness index for the original project was $4 per new trip (1989 dollars, 2010 ridership). OCTA has not recalculated the index to reflect the scaled back project, increases in construction costs since 1989, or increases in the value of time.


Environmental Benefits. Southern California is classified as an "extreme" nonattainment area for ozone and a "serious" nonattainment area for carbon monoxide. The original project concept was expected to remove 13,600 vehicles per day from the mixed flow lanes.


Operating Efficiencies. Based on the original project concept, the systemwide operating cost per transit passenger was projected to be $1.68 for the No-Build alternative, $2.14 for the TSM alternative, and $2.10 for Build alternative.
Local
Financial
Commitment

Orange County is requesting a Section 5309 New Start funding share of $288 million, or 70 percent of project costs. Over half of the non-Federal share would be provided from Measure M county sales tax. The finance plan also includes $26 million of developer, special district and general revenue funds from local jurisdictions.

The capital finance plan is rated "low-medium". A detailed plan is not currently in place, due to ongoing negotiations with other funding agencies and private sources. The Measure M sales tax, passed in 1990, set aside $125 million for transitways with an unspecified portion for this project. Funding projections for Measure M appear reasonable.

The stability and reliability of operating revenues are rated "low". This is due in part to the lack of clarity and commitment in the finance plan. Also, state law addressing the County's bankruptcy requires that OCTD provide $38 million Transportation Development Act (TDA) funds each year to the County of Orange for 15 years beginning July 1, 1996. In turn, $23 million of county gas tax funds would be returned to OCTD as back fill, leaving a gap of $15 million each year for the transit agency for the second to the 15th year. OCTD will loose the full $38 million the first year. Thirty-one of 73 bus routes, representing 21 percent of the bus service including express service, may need to be eliminated, unless OCTD can obtain additional funding. The agency reports some success in doing this. An updated financial plan is due in early 1996. In 1994, the average age of OCTD's bus fleet was 9.5 years which is comparable to the national average.


Proposed
Source of Funds
Total Funding ($million)



Federal:



Section 5309 New Start 288.30 ($20.34 million appropriated through FY 1996)

State: 120.80

Local:



TOTAL 409.10


NOTE: Funding proposal reflects assumptions made by project sponsors, and are not DOT or FTA assumptions.


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Cross County Metro Corridor

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) is initiating a $1.5 million Major Investment Study/Draft Environmental Impact Statement (MIS/DEIS) for the Cross County Metro Study Corridor. The core study extends approximately 48 miles from Glenloch, Chester County, to Morrisville, Bucks County, along CONRAIL's existing "Trenton Cutoff" freight rail line. Possible extensions to Trenton, New Jersey and Parkesburg, Chester County, comprise the secondary study corridor.

Status

Section 3035(yy) of ISTEA directed FTA to enter into a multiyear grant agreement with SEPTA in the amount of $2.4 million for the completion of alternatives analysis and preliminary engineering for the proposed Cross County Metro. To date, Congress has appropriated $1.2 million for preliminary engineering and design.

In 1994, SEPTA completed a $250,000 federally-funded feasibility study which examined potential ridership, alternative modes, preliminary station locations and capital and operating costs for a potential Cross County Metro service. The light rail alternative proved to be the most cost effective, with more than 9,100 new transit trips, 18 stations and an estimated cost of $250 million. Use of transit based fares increased forecasted light rail ridership to more than 11,700 trips. An enhanced land use scenario resulted in an additional 19 percent increase in ridership to approximately 14,000 trips for the light rail alternative.

In 1994, SEPTA applied for and received all of the appropriated funds to undertake a Major Investment Study and preparation of a draft EIS.

A key issue in the MIS/DEIS will be intermodalism, since access to proposed stations, development of park and ride lots and operation of shuttle bus service to nearby industrial, office and retail concentrations will be essential to attract ridership in the study corridor. Related issues are municipal land use and zoning policies, as well as community attitudes concerning the introduction of new transit service in an auto-oriented suburban environment.

The MIS/DEIS will also examine funding options for the capital and operating expenses associated with the proposed alternatives. The MIS/EIS is intended to result in a locally preferred alternative and sufficient information for FTA to evaluate the proposed project as a candidate for New Start funding.

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Northeast Philadelphia Corridor

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The City of Philadelphia and the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) are considering new, fixed route transit services for the Northeast section of Philadelphia parallel to I-95 and Route 1 (Roosevelt Boulevard). At the same time, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation is advancing a major reconstruction and intermodal project for I-95, and has been working with the City of Philadelphia, SEPTA, and Bucks County on various rail, transit, and park and ride components of the overall project. The SEPTA and City service proposals are intended to supplement the existing R3 line and R7 line Regional Rail Service, which traverses Northeast Philadelphia, and are separate from the rail and transit components of the pending I-95 reconstruction project.

Status

Section 3035(gg) of ISTEA directed FTA to enter into a multiyear grant agreement with SEPTA for $0.4 million to provide for a study of the feasibility of instituting additional commuter rail service in the corridor. To date, Congress has not appropriated funds for the proposed study. A draft scope of work was prepared by SEPTA in 1992 with the goal of combining the proposed ISTEA study and a previously awarded City of Philadelphia technical study into a single study of Northeast Philadelphia public transportation needs and options. The lack of a congressional appropriation resulted in abandonment of this approach and the initiation of the city's separate study in 1993.

In 1995, the Philadelphia City Planning Commission completed the Northeast Philadelphia Rapid Transit Extension Study, which analyzed alternative alignments, potential ridership, costs and impacts of light rail and subway/elevated rapid transit to serve Northeast Philadelphia. The study focused on extensions of SEPTA's Broad Street subway and the Market Frankford Subway Elevated line, as well as possible light rail service. SEPTA's proposed Northeast Metro, which includes conversion of the R8 Fox Chase line to light rail service, use of CONRAIL's New York Short Line and local street running to the new Philadelphia Convention Center, were added to the Planning Commission's study at SEPTA's request. The study recommends advancement of the proposed subway and rapid transit extensions to a Major Investment Study (MIS). The Northeast Metro was not recommended for advancement due to the Planning Commission's belief that it did not serve the primary ridership market in the Northeast and local business concerns, along the American Street corridor, who objected to the proposed on-street, light rail service. SEPTA disagrees with the conclusions and recommendations of the technical study and believes the Northeast Metro concept warrants further analysis through a separate MIS process. Congress has not appropriated any funds for this project.

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Phase I Airport Busway/Wabash HOV Facility

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The Port Authority of Allegheny County (PATransit) is constructing a 7-mile busway and an HOV facility. The busway, extending from Carnegie to downtown Pittsburgh, will follow sections of active and abandoned railroad right of way from Carnegie to Station Square, which is across the Monongahela River from downtown Pittsburgh. At Station Square the exclusive busway will intersect a 1.1 mile HOV facility comprised of a rehabilitated Wabash Tunnel and new bridge across the Monongahela River, which would complete the connection into downtown Pittsburgh. In the remaining 12 miles of the corridor, from Carnegie to the airport, buses will operate in mixed traffic on the relatively uncongested Parkway West (I-279). There will be a direct ramp connection in Carnegie between the busway and the Parkway West.

The project is estimated to cost $326.80 million (escalated dollars). New daily transit and carpool trips is estimated to be 17,930.


Status

In 1992, the PATransit Board completed alternatives analysis and selected the Busway/Wabash HOV/New River Crossing to Market Street as the locally preferred alternative. The final EIS was approved in June 1994.

A construction groundbreaking ceremony was held on October 27, 1994 when the full funding grant agreement (FFGA) was signed. The FFGA calls for $121.00 million in Section 5309 new start funds. The remainder of the project budget will be funded through a combination of Section 5309 bus funds, CMAQ funds, intermodal funds pursuant to ISTEA Sections 1108 and 1069, and funds from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Through FY96, Congress has appropriated $98.40 million in Section 5309 New Start funds, $19 million in Section 5309 bus funds, $15.80 million in ISTEA Section 1069 funds, and $8.00 million in Section 1108 funds. An additional $22.74 million in reallocated New Starts funds were also provided in FY 1996, bringing the total Section 5309 New Start funding to $121.0 million.

The project is expected to open for revenue service in 1998.


Source of Funds
Total Funding ($million)



Federal:



Section 5309 New Start 121.00 ($121.0 million appropriated through FY 1996)


Section 5309 Bus 10.00


CMAQ 76.50


Section 1108 9.80


Section 1069 39.50

State:


  State Bond Funds: 70.00


TOTAL 326.80

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Stage II Light Rail Transit Reconstruction Project

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

(November 1, 1995)


Description

During the 1980s, 13 miles of the 25-mile rail system in Pittsburgh were reconstructed to light rail standards under the Stage I Light Rail Transit (LRT) project. The Stage II system consists of the Overbrook, Library and Drake trolley lines, which comprise the remaining 12 miles.

The Stage II project would reconstruct these three lines to LRT standards, double-track the single-track segments, replace antiquated trolleys with new light rail vehicles, and add over 2,000 park and ride spaces.

The estimated cost for this project is $414 million (escalated dollars). In 2005, the estimated daily ridership for Stage II is expected to be 25,157 with over 49,000 riders for the entire light rail system.


Status

Section 3035(ss) of ISTEA directed FTA to sign a multiyear grant agreement with the Port Authority of Allegheny County for $5 million to complete preliminary engineering for the Stage II project. The Port Authority of Allegheny County has submitted an Environmental Assessment for the Stage II LRT system and expects to complete the environmental process in late 1995. The Port Authority will begin preliminary engineering in early 1996. The project is included in a financially constrained long range plan that was adopted by the MPO.

The Port Authority of Allegheny County (PATransit, or "PAT") is developing a financial plan to undertake reconstruction, and is assuming that $65 million in Section 5309 Fixed Guideway Modernization (formula) funding will be available for the Stage II improvement through 1997. The remainder of the estimated project cost will be funded by a program that is anticipated to include 80 percent Federal funding from Section 5309 New Start Funds, Section 5309 Fixed Guideway Modernization Funds and ISTEA Flexible Funds (including CMAQ Funds) matched by Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County funding.

Congress has appropriated $35 million for this project through Section 5309 Fixed Guideway Modernization.


Justification

Mobility Improvements: LRT construction would increase operating speeds on all three lines. The greatest increase would occur between Castle Shannon and South Hills Junction on the Overbrook Line where travel times would be reduced by 9 minutes. Many LRT riders who currently use the Beechview Line would be expected to switch to the faster Overbrook Line.

Cost Effectiveness: FTA has no information on the cost effectiveness of this proposal.

Environmental Benefits: The Pittsburgh area is classified as a "moderate" nonattainment area for ozone and has not been classified for carbon monoxide. According to the draft Environmental Assessment, the Stage II reconstruction would remove about 2,000 average daily automobile trips from South Hills roads compared with the TSM alternative.

Operating Efficiencies: Replacement of all three lines with buses operating on local streets would yield operating costs in the South Hills corridor of $1.65 per passenger. Operating costs in the corridor with the Stage II improvement in place would be $1.58 per passenger.


Local

Financial

Commitment


PAT anticipates 80 percent Federal funding for this project. Pennsylvania has traditionally provided for 16 2/3 percent of PAT's capital costs with the remaining 3 1/3 percent coming from Allegheny County. PAT's plan for financing this project assumes State and local participation at the same rates.

In 1991, the Pennsylvania legislature approved a series of small taxes which are dedicated to transit. PAT's share of this is approximately $40 million per year. These funds are exclusively used for asset maintenance and routine capital replacement needs.

In 1995, the average age of PAT's bus fleet is 5.8 years, which is better than the national average. Rail vehicles average age is approximately 16 years old.


Other Factors

The Overbrook Line was closed in 1993 because of the deteriorated condition of old bridges. Reconstruction would bring this line back into service. The Drake and Library lines also would eventually need to be closed permanently if the Stage II project is not implemented.

Proposed
Source of Funds
Total Funding ($million)


Federal:



Section 5309 New Start 80.00 ($0.0 appropriated through FY 1996)


Section 5309 Fixed Guideway 152.00


ISTEA Flexible Funds 99.20

State: 69.00

Local: 13.80


TOTAL 414.00


NOTE: Funding proposal reflects assumptions made by project sponsors, and are not DOT or FTA assumptions.


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South/North Corridor

Portland, Oregon - Vancouver, Washington

(April 1, 1996)


Description

The South/North Corridor project is a bi-state light rail line between the Clackamas Regional Center, Oregon and Vancouver, Washington. The LRT line would be approximately 20 miles long and would connect the Clackamas Regional Center, Milwaukie, OR, Portland, OR and Vancouver, WA.

Capital costs for the South/North LRT project are estimated to be $1.4 billion in 1994 dollars ($2.4 billion in escalated dollars). The project is proposed to be constructed in two segments over two authorization periods. Metro estimates the LRT line would carry about 68,000 daily riders in the year 2015.


Status

Metro has completed the South/North Corridor Major Investment Study which evaluated a range of mode and alignment options for the corridor. In December 1994, the Metro Council and C-TRAN Board of Directors selected light rail as the locally preferred alternative. The project is included in the Metropolitan Transportation Plan for both Portland and Vancouver. FTA approved the initiation of preliminary engineering on April 1, 1996, and Metro expects to complete the final environmental impact statement by June 1997.

Justification

Mobility Improvements. The South/North LRT would serve the congested I-5 and McLoughlin Boulevard travel markets, improving traffic service levels and providing mobility benefits to major concentrations of transportation disadvantaged persons. Transit travel times would be approximately 33 percent quicker between the Portland CBD and the major activity centers located within the corridor as compared to an all-bus system. For example, the transit travel time between the Milwaukie CBD and the Portland CBD would be 28 minutes with an all-bus network and 18 minutes with South/North LRT. South/North LRT would attract over 30,000 new riders and would result in over $2 million in annual travel time savings to existing transit riders compared to an all-bus network in the corridor.


Cost Effectiveness. The cost effectiveness index is $5 per new rider.


Environmental Benefits. The Portland/Vancouver Metropolitan region is currently in non-attainment for both ozone and carbon monoxide.

South/North LRT and related land use densities are a major component of the region=s air quality maintenance plan.



Operating Efficiencies. Systemwide operating costs would drop from $1.51 per passenger with an all-bus network in the South/North Corridor to $1.48 with South/North LRT.
Local
Financial
Commitment

Tri-Met will be seeking a 50 percent Section 5309 New Start share for this project. To date, a total of $850 million of local funds have been secured for construction of the project. In November 1994, Portland region voters approved a $475 million General Obligation bond for the project. In August 1995, the Oregon legislature approved $375 million for the project. The Vancouver area is currently reevaluating its financing strategy.

Other Factors

Land Use. Transit supportive land use controls, including growth boundaries to constrain sprawl, are in place in both Oregon and Washington portions of the Corridor. There are enforceable transit-supportive plans in all jurisdictions along the Corridor; parking controls in Portland; and station area planning activities focusing on the entire Corridor.

Proposed
Source of Funds
Total Funding ($million)


Federal:



Section 5309 New Start 1200.00 ($0.0 appropriated through FY 1996)

State and local: 1200.00


TOTAL 2400.00


NOTE: Funding proposal reflects assumptions made by project sponsors, and are not DOT or FTA assumptions.




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Westside Corridor

Portland, Oregon

(November 1, 1995)


Description

The Westside-Hillsboro Light Rail Project extends the existing MAX system from the terminus in downtown Portland to downtown Hillsboro. The route includes a three mile twin tube tunnel under the West Hills. The project is 17.7 miles long with 20 stations, 9 park and ride lots, and parking spaces for approximately 3,700 automobiles.

The project will include 36 low-floor light rail vehicles. These will be the first low-floor light rail vehicles in service in the United States. The project is expected to carry 27,100 passengers on an average weekday in 2005. In August 1995, construction of the Westside-Hillsboro Project was estimated to cost $935.00 million (year of expenditure dollars). Construction is approximately 40 percent complete.


Status

Section 3035(b) of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) directs the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) to enter into a multiyear grant agreement with the Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon (Tri-Met) in the amount of $515.00 million for the segment from downtown Portland to 185th Avenue.

In September 1992, FTA and Tri-Met entered into a $688.00 million full funding grant agreement (FFGA) for the segment from downtown Portland to 185th Avenue. The Section 5309 New Start share for this segment is $516.00 million, including $1 million previously authorized funds.

Final design and construction for the Hillsboro extension commenced under a Letter of No Prejudice issued by FTA in August 1994.

Consistent with the Department of Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriations Act (P.L. 102-143), the two extensions were combined into a single $910 million project in December 1994. Tri-Met entered into a $910 million FFGA with FTA in December 1994. The 1994 FFGA for the Westside-Hillsboro project provides a contingent commitment of Section 5309 New Start funds of $74 million to fund one-third of the Hillsboro extension cost.

Construction is underway along the entire alignment with approximately $619 million committed and $382 million spent through September 1995. Overall the project is approximately 40 percent complete. With the exception of the tunnel, all contracts are proceeding generally within the schedule and budget. The projected revenue operation date is September 1998.

The critical path for the project is set by the tunnel construction. The tunnel is nearly 60 percent complete with two of three 150 foot shafts, and one tunnel bore excavated. Unexpected soil conditions have resulted in significant delays and an estimated $25 million cost increase to the project.

There has been a total of $467.24 million in Federal funds made available to the project through Federal fiscal year 1996, including $393.25 million in Section 5309 New Start funds.


Source of Funds
Total Funding ($million)



Federal:



Section 5309 New Start
FFGA Amount
590.05 ($393.25 million appropriated through FY 1996)


Section 5307 30.00


Flexible Funds 44.00

Local: 246.13


TOTAL 910.18

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