Appendix A Listing 2

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South Corridor

Sacramento, California

(April 1, 1996)

Description

The Sacramento Regional Transit District (RT) is developing an 11.3-mile light rail project on the Union Pacific right-of-way in the South Sacramento Corridor. RT has elected to phase the project to maximize the use of available state and local capital funds and to correspond with available operating funds. Phase 1, known as the Interim Operable Segment (IOS), consists of a 6.3-mile segment of the full project. The segment would operate between downtown Sacramento and Meadowview Road and has been forecast to carry 25,000 passengers per day in the year 2015. The estimated capital cost of the IOS is $220.3 million (escalated dollars). Phase 2 is estimated to cost an additional $222 million (1995 dollars).

Status

Section 3035(xx) of ISTEA directed FTA to enter into a multiyear grant agreement with RT for $26 million to provide for the completion of alternatives analysis, preliminary engineering, and final design. Of that amount, $3.96 million was appropriated through fiscal year 1996.


The Major Investment Study/Alternatives Analysis/Draft EIS was completed in September 1994. RT selected its preferred alternative in January 1995. Phase 1 was defined in August 1995, and RT expects to complete preliminary engineering and a final EIS on Phase 1 in Spring 1996. RT is currently funding preliminary engineering and the final EIS with $3.8 million in local dollars.The full project is shown in the most recent Sacramento Area of Council of Governments (SACOG) Long Range 20 Year Plan.


RT expects to begin preliminary engineering for Phase 2 as soon as additional operating funds can be secured. A one cent state gas tax is to be voted on in 1998.

Justification

Mobility Improvements - Population, employment and person trips in the Sacramento area are expected to increase significantly in the next twenty years, with the South corridor expected to grow at rates higher than the regional averages. This is projected to result in substantial deterioration in the levels of service on the two north-south freeways in the corridor, I-5 and State Highway 99. Phase 1 of the project is forecast to attract as many as 4,585 new daily riders to transit, and save 2,688 daily hours of transit travel time over the TSM alternative.


Cost Effectiveness - The cost-effectiveness index for the full project is $1 per new rider. The cost-effectiveness index for Phase 1 is $6 per new rider.


Environmental Benefits - Sacramento has recently changed from a "serious" to a "severe" nonattainment area for ozone and a "moderate" nonattainment area for carbon monoxide. The IOS would reduce daily automobile trips by 3,779 and the full build would reduce auto trips by 6,651 per day (compared with the TSM alternative).


Operating Efficiencies - The IOS will improve the operating cost per passenger from $1.86 to $1.80, compared to the TSM alternative.

Local
Financial
Commitment

For Phase 1, RT intends to request 44 percent funding from the Section 5309 New Start program. State sources, derived from Proposition 108 and 116 bond funds, would contribute 39 percent. Measure A sales tax revenues, Local Transportation Fund proceeds, developer fees and other revenues would cover 17 percent. While RT does not propose to use STP or CMAQ funds for this project, it does plan to use $127 million in flexible funds for other transit needs.

The capital finance plan for Phase 1 is rated "high". The Proposition 108 and 116 state funds appear secure as a funding program and, in particular, as a funding source to this project. The funding risk appears low. The Measure A local sales tax is in place. The plan appears to be able to cover lower than expected growth rates as demonstrated in sensitivity analyses for each of the major funding sources.


The stability and reliability of operating support are rated "medium-high". Funding sources to operate the system are in place through 2008. Operating cost and revenue projections seem reasonable in comparison with trends. Overall, the plan appears to be able to cover unanticipated revenue shortfalls. In 1994, the average age of RT's bus fleet was 4.7 years old, which is better than the national average.


Proposed Source of Funds Total Funding
($million)
Description
Federal:
Section 5309 New Start
$104.00 $3.96 million appropriated through FY 1996
State/Local: $116.30 N/A
TOTAL $220.30

Other Factors - Adjacent to the City College station, a specific land use plan is being developed for the City College and Union Pacific Railyards. If the Union Pacific ceases operation at these rail yards, they plan to build a pedestrian and transit oriented mixed used development. Additional developments are to take place at the Franklin Boulevard and the Broadway Stations. RT is currently working with local developers on a joint development project at the Power Inn Station on the existing Folsom Line.

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BART to San Francisco International Airport

San Francisco, California

(April 1, 1995)

Description

The Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART), in conjunction with the San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans), plans to build a 7.5-mile, 4-station BART extension from Colma Station to Millbrae with an aerial station at the planned International Terminal at San Francisco International Airport. The LPA is estimated to cost $1.110 million (escalated dollars). Ridership is projected to be 69,000 trips per day by 2010.

Status

Section 3032(c) of ISTEA directed FTA to approve the construction of the locally preferred alternative for the BART San Francisco Airport Extension, including Phase 1a to Colma and Phase 1b to San Francisco International Airport. Section 3032(c)(2) mandated the execution of a multiyear grant agreement with BART to permit expenditure of funds for the construction of the BART-SFO Extension.


An Alternatives Analysis/Draft EIS/EIR was completed in 1992, resulting in a locally preferred alternative. New alignments were later evaluated and, in April 1995, BART and SamTrans revised the preferred alternative. Due to MTC and congressional direction to evaluate lower cost options, an aerial design option to the tunnel alignment into the Airport was evaluated in a Focused Recirculated DEIR/Supplemental #2 DEIS. The final EIS is scheduled for completion in May/June 1996, and a ROD could be issued by July 1996.


The BART-SFO project is one of the projects participating in the FTA Turnkey Demonstration Program. ISTEA initiated this program to determine if the turnkey (design/build) approach will reduce implementation time and cost.


Through FY 1996, $215.3 million of the $512.8 million of Section 5309 New Start funds (authorized by ISTEA FY 1992-97) has been appropriated for the San Francisco Bay Area and allocated by the MTC among the Colma BART extension, the BART-SFO project, and the Tasman LRT project. In accordance with the regional Memorandum of Understanding executed in December 1993, the affected agencies are currently working with MTC to determine future allocations. The Colma BART extension opened for revenue service in February 1996, and the Bay Area authorities hope to obtain a contingent commitment that would allow both the Airport and Tasman projects to proceed in late 1996.

Justification

The BART-SFO Extension is exempt from the Section 5309(e) new start criteria because the Section 5309 New Start share of the regional rail program is less than 33 percent.


Mobility Improvements - The BART extension to the Airport would improve transit access from San Francisco and the East Bay to the Airport and would also improve transit service along the Peninsula to San Francisco. The project would increase transit ridership on BART and CalTrain and increase regional transit ridership by 23,300 over the No-Build in 2010 and 13,600 over the TSM. Daily travel time savings would be 6,900 hours over the TSM.


Cost Effectiveness - The cost effectiveness index is $20 new transit rider.


Environmental Benefits - The Bay Area has been redesignated as an attainment area for ozone. The project would reduce daily vehicle miles traveled (VMT) by 485,000 in year 2010 versus the No-Build Alternative. Carbon monoxide emissions would be reduced by 1,235 tons per year.


The project would remove 10.5 acres of wetlands and upland habitat of threatened and endangered species. Mitigation measures are being developed in coordination with Federal and state resource agencies.


Operating Efficiencies - The systemwide operating cost per passenger is estimated to be $2.51 for the No-Build, $2.52 for the TSM and $2.56 for the BART Extension in 2010.

Local
Financial
Commitment

A regional financing agreement has tied this project to other fixed guideway projects in the Bay Area. The plan calls for 100 percent local funding of East Bay projects and 75 percent Section 5309 funding for this project, resulting in a 27 percent Section 5309 funding share of the region's fixed guideway extension program. The non-Federal funding would come from the local and state sources noted below. Although state bonding referendums failed in 1992 and 1994, the BART extension money included in the referendums has been replaced by other state funds.


The capital finance plan is rated "medium". More than half of the non-Federal funds are in place and the remaining sources have been identified. SamTrans has committed $99 million pursuant to a 1990 agreement with BART. There is $98 million in state gasoline sales tax funds committed to the project. An additional $10 million in state rail transit bond revenues was approved for the project in 1990. Pursuant to a 1989 toll increase on Bay Area bridges, the MTC has $10 million available for the project. The Mayor of San Francisco has directed the San Francisco Airports Commission to define mechanisms by which the Airport could financially participate. The project funding plan assumes that the Airports Commission will contribute up to $200 million. The final financial plan will be included in the final EIR/EIS.


The stability and reliability of operating assistance are rated "medium." BART and SamTrans derive operating revenues from a 0.5 percent dedicated transaction and use tax and from fare revenue. BART also has a dedicated property tax. SamTrans and BART appear to have the ability to fund system operations under expanding economic conditions. BART's projections of sales tax revenue growth seem conservative in comparison with trend data. The financial plan assumes substantial fare increases in 1996 and 1997. In 1994, the average age of SamTrans bus fleet was 4 years, which is better than the national average of 8.3 years. BART's rail vehicles averaged 16.7 years old.


Proposed Source of Funds Total Funding
($million)
Description
Federal:
Section 5309 New Start
$750.00 $65.38 million appropriated through FY 1996
Airport Commission $200.00 up to $200.00 million
State/Local: $160.00 N/A
TOTAL $1110.00

Note: Funding proposal reflects assumptions made by project sponsors, and are not DOT or FTA assumptions.

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South LRT

Salt Lake City, Utah

(November 1, 1995)

Description

The Utah Transit Authority (UTA) is implementing a 15-mile light rail transit (LRT) line from downtown Salt Lake City parallel to I-15 and State Street to suburban areas to the south. The LRT line will operate at-grade on city streets in downtown Salt Lake City (two miles) and in a railroad right-of-way (13 miles) owned by UTA to the suburban community of Sandy. The total cost of this project, including a maintenance facility, vehicles, stations, park-and-ride centers, and finance costs is estimated at $312.50 million. The LRT project is part of Interstate 15 corridor improvements which include reconstruction of a parallel segment of I-15. The project is estimated to carry 14,000 passengers per day in the year 2000 (opening year) and 23,000 passengers per day in 2010.

Status

Section 3035(f) of ISTEA directed FTA to enter into a multiyear grant agreement with UTA which provides $131 million in New Start funds to carry out the construction of the project. Through FY 1996, Congress has appropriated $38.60 million (including $15.52 million in funds from fiscal years prior to ISTEA) for right-of-way acquisition, engineering, design and construction.


Preliminary engineering has been completed. FTA issued the final Environmental Impact Statement in September 1994 and signed the record of decision in November 1994. UTA and FTA entered into a full funding grant agreement (FFGA) in August 1995. The FFGA calls for $35.00 million in Section 5309 new start funds in FY 1997.


Final design is currently underway with an estimated completion date of January 1997.

Proposed Source of Funds Total Funding
($million)
Description
Federal:
Section 5309 New Start
$237.40 $32.04 million appropriated through FY 1996
Section 5309 Bus $4.00 N/A
Local: $71.10 N/A
TOTAL $312.50

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Santa Monica Boulevard Transit Parkway

Los Angeles, California

(November 1, 1995)

Description

The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) is studying a section of Santa Monica Boulevard (SR-2) between the San Diego Freeway (I-405) and Moreno Drive, the boundary line between the cities of Los Angeles and Beverly Hills. The purpose of the study is to develop a multi-modal corridor, including improved operational efficiency of the roadway, priority treatments to improve bus transit flow, improved aesthetics, a bikeway and parkway, increased safety, and the preservation of the right-of-way for future rail improvements in the Santa Monica Boulevard corridor. The MTA has developed a project alternative with an estimated cost of $69.1 million.

Status

Section 3035 (eee) of ISTEA directed FTA to enter into a multiyear grant agreement with MTA for $15 million. The agreement would cover the construction of the initial 2.2-mile segment. These funds have not yet been appropriated. An additional $8.9 million was authorized in Section 1108 of ISTEA.


In April 1994, the MTA analyzed conceptual alternatives for transportation improvements in the larger Santa Monica Boulevard Corridor, between the 405 and 101 freeways. The Corridor Study recommended the Santa Monica Boulevard Transit Parkway as a near-term improvement.


The MTA subsequently prepared a Project Study Report (PSR) for the project, which was approved by Caltrans in October 1994. The PSR outlined a 10-lane, one-way couplet project concept, which included dedicated bus transit lanes and a landscaped bikeway. The creation of a grand boulevard composed of two one-way roadways, incorporating neighborhood protections, neighborhood access, on-street parking, and possibly a frontage road, would resolve the queuing limitations, improve safety of the two roadways, and provide a more efficient facility.


In June 1995, the Major Investment Study (MIS) Review Committee determined that an MIS is required for this project area. The MTA is currently in the consultant selection process to perform an MIS. As requested by the MIS Review Committee, the MIS will study additional alternatives, including alternatives with fewer lanes, different frontage road configurations, and with and without bus-only or HOV lanes. Upon completion of the MIS, the MTA will prepare a Caltrans Project Report.

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Tren Urbano

San Juan, Puerto Rico

(April 1, 1995)

Description

The Puerto Rico Department of Transportation and Public Works (DTPW), through its Highway and Transportation Authority (HTA), will build a 10.4-mile (17.3-km) double-track guideway between Bayamon Centro and the Sagrado Corazon area of Santurce in San Juan. Approximately 40 percent of the alignment is at or near grade. The remainder, aside from a short below-grade section in the Centro Medico area and underground through Rio Piedras, is generally elevated above roadway rights-of way. The project includes 14 stations and a vehicle and trackway maintenance/storage facility. The alignment allows for the future addition of two stations if deemed necessary, one in Rio Piedras and one in Hato Rey.


The project is estimated to cost $1.11 billion (year of expenditure dollars) and is expected to carry 114,000 riders per day in 2010.

Description

In 1993, FTA selected Tren Urbano as one of four turnkey demonstration projects. The Tren Urbano project will be constructed and operated under a turnkey procurement policy in order to expedite the implementation of the project and to develop the necessary institutional capability to operate Tren Urbano. ISTEA initiated this program to determine if the turnkey (design/build) approach will reduce implementation time and cost.


The project is in the preliminary engineering phase of development. The final environmental impact statement was completed in October 1995, and a Record of Decision (ROD) was issued in December, 1995. A Full Funding Grant Agreement (FFGA) for the project was signed on March 13, 1996.


The project was not authorized in ISTEA. Through FY 1996, Congress has appropriated $12.4 million for the project.

Justification

Under the current financing strategy, the project would be exempt from the New Start criteria because the Section 5309 share would be less than one-third of the capital cost.


Mobility Improvements - The number of cars per capita in Puerto Rico has grown to levels comparable to the mainland, but highway lane miles per automobile are far below mainland levels, resulting in extreme highway congestion, especially in San Juan. Travel time savings of over 10,000 hours daily are projected for the Tren Urbano project.


Cost Effectiveness - The cost effectiveness index is $1 per new rider (1994 dollars, 2010 ridership).


Environmental Benefits - San Juan is an attainment area for ozone and carbon monoxide. Compared with the No Build alternative, the project is expected to reduce regional carbon monoxide emissions by 26 percent, hydrocarbon emissions by 25 percent, and oxides of nitrogen emissions by 7 percent.


Operating Efficiencies - Information on the operating and maintenance cost per passenger is not available.

Local
Financial
Commitment

DTPW is seeking $300.1 million, or 23 percent of project costs, from the Section 5309 New Start program. The remaining funding would be provided by local revenues from the Puerto Rico Highway and Transportation Authority (PRHTA) and flexible funds. All operating costs, as well as debt service on PRHTA bonds, would be paid as part of the PRHTA annual budget, established in accordance with standard PRHTA budget procedures.


The capital financing plan is rated "high". PRHTA generates revenues from gasoline taxes, oil and diesel oil taxes, motor vehicle registration fees, and investment income. The Authority will collect approximately $3.0 billion over the horizon of the cash flow summary. These internally generated funds will be used during FY 1996 and 1997 to meet Tren Urbano obligations. The PRHTA has authority to issue revenue bonds to finance transportation system improvements which alleviate traffic congestion. The PRHTA intends to exercise this authority and issue senior and subordinated Highway Revenue Bonds in amounts sufficient to meet its capital construction needs. The bonds will be supported by PRHTA revenues and flexible funds.


The stability and reliability of operating funds are rated "high". The turnkey procurement will guarantee Tren Urbano operations for at least 5 years. Operating deficits would be covered by the PRHTA revenue sources noted above. Funds to operate the existing bus system come from appropriations by the Commonwealth and have been adequate in the past. In 1992 the average age of the Metropolitan Bus Authority's bus fleet was 7.3 years, which is better than the national average.


Proposed Source of Funds Total Funding
($million)
Description
Federal:
Section 5309 New Start
$312.40 $12.40 million appropriated through FY 1996
COPs backed by CMAQ and STP funds $300.00 N/A
State: $509.50 N/A
TOTAL $1121.90

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St. Charles, Missouri Corridor

St. Louis, Missouri Metropolitan Area

(November 1, 1995)

Description

The East West Gateway Coordinating Council (EWGCC) is studying transit alternatives for a 15-mile corridor between Lambert Airport and the City of St. Peters in St. Charles County, Missouri. Alternative modes being considered include light rail, busway, TSM, and No Build. One busway and three LRT alignments have been proposed for study.

Status

FTA approved initiation of alternatives analysis in February 1993. The study will produce information on the mobility improvements, cost effectiveness, environmental benefits, and operating efficiencies associated with each alternative. The study is expected to be completed in 1996, when a preferred alternative and financing plan will be adopted.


Through FY 1996, Congress has appropriated $0.5 million for the alternatives analysis.

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St. Clair County, Illinois Corridor

St. Louis, Missouri Metropolitan Area

(April 1, 1996)

Description

The Bi-State Development Agency (Bi-State) is proposing a 27-mile light rail line between downtown East St. Louis, Illinois, and the Mid America Airport in St. Clair County. The project would extend the MetroLink light rail project which opened in July 1993. The adopted alignment generally follows the former CSXT railroad right-of-way from East St. Louis to Belleville, IL and serves the Belleville Area College and Scott Air Force Base. A 17-mile "first construction phase" would terminate at Belleville Area College.


The full project is estimated to cost $431.5 million (escalated dollars) and is projected to carry 10,000 to 15,000 riders per day in the year 2010. The "first construction phase" is estimated to cost $295.0 million.

Status

The East-West Gateway Coordinating Council (the MPO) completed a Major Investment Study and draft EIS in 1995. The study examined transit technology and alignment alternatives, and led to selection of the CSXT LRT as the preferred alternative. The project is included in the MPO's adopted transportation plan.


The preliminary engineering (PE) phase of project development was initiated in 1995. As part of PE, Bi-State has modified the alignment to serve the Belleville Area College and has relocated many of the proposed stations. The cost and ridership estimates are also being refined.


Due to the changes in the project, and to provide more detail on environmental impacts, a supplemental draft EIS is being developed. Bi-State hopes to complete PE and the EIS process by September, 1996.


The project was not authorized in ISTEA. Through FY 1996, Congress has appropriated $16.42 million for the project.

Justification

Mobility Improvements - In the Major Investment Study (MIS), EWGCC estimated that the project would increase transit ridership (bus and rail) by 3885 trips per day in 2010, compared with the no build alternative, and would save 700 to 800 hours of travel time per day in 2010. These forecasts are being revised as part of the PE phase. The latest ridership forecasts are significantly higher than those developed in the MIS.


Cost Effectiveness - The latest cost effectiveness index for the 27-mile project is $23 per new rider. This index corresponds to the revised alignment serving Belleville Area College but does not fully reflect the higher ridership forecasts that have been produced in PE. The index is not directly comparable to the index for other projects because it is based on the no build option.


Environmental Benefits - St. Louis, including St. Clair County, is a"moderate" nonattainment area for ozone and a "not classified" nonattainment area for carbon monoxide. According to the MIS, the project would reduce auto passenger trips by 374 per day. This estimate does not reflect the higher ridership forecasts that have been produced in PE.


Operating Efficiencies - Based on 2010 projected ridership and operating costs from the MIS, the systemwide operating cost would be $2.72 per passenger for the No Build alternative and $2.94 per passenger with the LRT project. This estimate does not reflect the higher ridership forecasts that have been produced in PE.

Local
Financial
Commitment

Bi State is seeking an 80 percent share from the Section 5309 New Start program. Half of the non-Federal share would be generated from a 3/4-cent transit district sales tax, increased by 1/2 percent to the current level by referendum in 1993. The remaining non-Federal share would be provided by the State of Illinois. If the state share is not forthcoming, the full 20 percent non-Federal share would be derived from the local sales tax.


The capital finance plan for the 27-mile project is rated "medium-high". A dedicated local revenue source is in place and sufficient non-Federal funds are projected to be available under carefully controlled circumstances. The sales tax is robust enough to raise the 20 percent share for a $400 million project if necessary. State of Illinois funds have not yet been committed to project construction. The finance plan will need to be updated to reflect any changes in the project and its cost estimate that result from PE.


For the 27-mile project, the stability and reliability of operating assistance are rated "low-medium". If local sales tax revenues must be used for the full 20 percent non-Federal share, Bi-State is projected to deplete its reserves within 4 years of LRT opening, leaving an unfunded deficit. With a 10 percent state share, the unfunded deficit occurs 12 years after opening. The "first construction phase" would have lower capital and operating costs, enhancing the stability and reliability of operating assistance. In 1994, Bi-State's bus fleet averaged 9.4 years old, which is comparable to the national average.


Proposed Source of Funds Total Funding
($million)
Description
Federal:
Section 5309 New Start
$236.00 $16.42 million appropriated through FY 1996
State:
Long-term general obligation bonds
$29.50 N/A
Local:
¾% sales tax
$29.50 N/A
TOTAL $295.00

Note: Funding proposal reflects assumptions made by project sponsors, and are not DOT or FTA assumptions.

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Cross-County Corridor

St. Louis, Missouri Metropolitan Area

(November 1, 1995)

Description

The East West Gateway Coordinating Council (EWGCC) and the Missouri Highway and Transportation Department are jointly studying alternatives for an 18-mile north-south corridor from the vicinity of I-270/I-170 near Lambert Airport south to Mehlville in the vicinity of I-270/I-55 in southeast St. Louis County. The study is also considering an east-west connection through Clayton, Missouri to the existing MetroLink system. The Cross-County corridor traverses four other corridors in the St. Louis metropolitan area and is designed to facilitate north-south movements through the central portion of St. Louis County. This study will evaluate light rail, busway, highway, TSM, and No Build alternatives.


Preliminary cost estimates developed during system planning determined capital costs to be in the range of $269-$307 million (1989 dollars) for LRT.

Status

FTA approved initiation of Alternatives Analysis/Major Investment Study (MIS) in September 1993. The study will produce information on the mobility improvements, cost effectiveness, environmental benefits, and operating efficiencies associated with each alternative. The MIS phase is expected to be completed in the Summer of 1997, when a preferred alternative and financing plan will be adopted.


Through FY 1996, Congress has appropriated $0.5 million for alternatives analysis.

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Tampa to Lakeland Corridor

Tampa, Florida

(November 1, 1995)

Description

The Hillsborough Area Transit Authority (HART) is undertaking a study of transportation alternatives in the 32-mile corridor between Tampa and Lakeland, Florida. One alternative to be considered is a commuter rail line on existing CSX tracks that parallel I-4. The commuter rail alternative is estimated to cost approximately $30 million and to attract 1,200 riders per day in the opening year.

Status

A number of studies have indicated that transit improvements might relieve traffic on I-4 between Lakeland and Tampa. Two rail studies have recently been completed -- a feasibility study looking at system design, operational characteristics and costs, and a study identifying public support for such a system. In October 1995, the HART Board adopted a goal of developing a comprehensive 75 mile rail system in Hillsborough County, tied to complementary high speed rail service and the HARTRail extension eastward in Polk County.


HART is about to undertake a major investment study (MIS) that will consider alternatives for addressing transportation problems in the I-4 corridor. The study will generate information the FTA could use to evaluate any resulting transit project for possible Section 5309 New Start funding.


In FY 1996, Congress appropriated $500,000 for the corridor.

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Tasman LRT

San Jose, California

(November 1, 1995)

Description

The Santa Clara County Transit District (SCCTD) is developing a 12.4-mile light rail project between Capitol/Hosletter and downtown Mountain View. The project includes 19 stations and 35 light rail vehicles. The invalidation of the Measure A sales tax (see below) caused the development of new financing alternatives and the separation of the project into two phases, Phase I (West Extension) and Phase 2 (East Extension).


The West Extension consists of 7.6 miles of surface LRT from the northern terminus of the Guadalupe LRT in Santa Clara, west through Sunnyvale, to the CalTrain commuter rail station in Mountain View. The project will include 11 stations and will be double tracked except for partial single tracking between the Mountain View and Lockheed stations. The West Extension is estimated to cost $325.4 million. Ridership on the West Extension is projected to be 7,500 per day or 2.3 million per year by 2005, increasing total LRT system ridership to 10.7 million per year.

Status

Section 3032 of ISTEA directed FTA to approve the construction of the locally preferred alternative not later than 90 days after the completion of preliminary engineering, and to enter into a multiyear grant agreement for 50 percent of the project's cost unless this percentage is changed by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC).


Preliminary engineering was completed in August 1992, and final design is virtually complete. FTA has issued a Letter of Intent to fund 50 percent of the cost of the 12.4-mile project.


On September 28, 1995, the California Supreme Court overturned the Measure A one-half cent local sales tax, thus eliminating the major source of local funds to construct and operate the 12.4-mile project. The SCCTD has rescoped the project to reduce cost. Full funding grant agreement (FFGA) negotiations are continuing with the focus on the West Extension. The East Extension is being deferred until additional funding is identified and secured, possibly in the 2005-2010 time frame.


MTC and the affected operators have agreed on the future allocation of Section 5309 New Starts program funds between Tasman and the BART SFO Extension Project. The Bay Area hopes to obtain a contingent commitment that would allow the Tasman West and BART SFO projects to be built simultaneously.

Justification

The Tasman LRT project is exempt from the Section 5309(e) New Start criteria because the Section 5309 share of the regional program is less than 33 percent.


Mobility Improvements - The 12.4-mile Tasman project serves the work trip market from southern Alameda County, northeastern San Jose, and Milpitas to the high tech employment centers located in north San Jose, Sunnyvale and Mountain View. It is estimated that the full project would result in a total weekday travel time savings of 3,300 hours.


The West Extension would improve service to the work trip market between residential areas of southern and central San Jose and the Silicon Valley employment centers in northern Santa Clara County. The linkage to CalTrain in Mountain View will serve work trips to and from San Francisco and San Mateo counties. It is estimated that the West Extension would save of 2,568 hours of travel time per day.


Cost Effectiveness - The cost effectiveness index for the West Extension is $18 per new rider (2005 riders, 1994 dollars).


Environmental Benefits - The San Jose Area along with the entire Bay Region has been redesignated by EPA as a "maintenance" area for ozone. Compared with the no build alternative, the West Extension project would reduce VMT in the study area by less than 1 percent. Compared with a TSM alternative, VMT would be reduced by approximately 0.2 percent.


Operating Efficiencies - The systemwide operating cost per passenger is estimated to be $2.99 for the No-Build alternative, $2.94 for the TSM alternative, and $3.82 for the Tasman West Extension.

Local
Financial
Commitment

SCCTD is seeking Section 5309 New Start funds for 50 percent of the cost of the West Extension. The plan anticipates $122 million in Section 5309 New Start funds, in addition to $60.75 million previously granted. The remaining 50 percent will be obtained from Federal and state flexible funds, including CMAQ, Flexible Congestion Relief (FCR), State Rail Bond funds and local sources including $15 million from the City of Mountain View. FCR is a state-administered flexible funding program which combines state gas tax funds with NHS and state STP funds.


SCCTD is also using flexible funds for other elements of its capital program.


The capital finance plan for the West Extension is rated "medium". The state TIP includes $79.7 million in FCR funds for the project. An agreement has been reached to reprogram $15 million in CMAQ funds to the project. Most of the remaining state and local funds have yet to be committed, but state support is documented and the funds appear secure. The City of Mountain View has pledged its $15 million contribution.


The stability and reliability of operating funds are rated "medium". SCCTD operations are supported by a 1/2 cent local dedicated sales tax and other state and local programs. Sales tax revenues are again growing as Santa Clara County's high tech manufacturing industries experience strong worldwide demand for their products. SCCTD has reduced operating costs in each of the last three fiscal years. In October 1995, SCCTD restored 10 minute LRT headways, thus reversing a January 1993 service reduction. LRT ridership has risen 11 percent since October 1994. SCCTD's operating cost and revenue projections are reasonably consistent with recent trends and demonstrate a continuing ability to fund the bus and rail system. In 1994, the average age of the SCCTD bus fleet was 6.5 years, which is better than the national average.

Proposed Source of Funds Total Funding
($million)
Description
Federal:
Section 5309 New Start
$182.50 $93.98 million appropriated through FY 1996
CMAQ $15.00 N/A
State:
(includes state STP)
$102.10 $10.20 million appropriated through FY 1996
Local: $25.80 N/A
TOTAL $325.40

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Tri-County Commuter Rail

Ft. Lauderdale, West Palm Beach and Miami, Florida

(November 1, 1995)

Description

The Tri-County Commuter Rail Authority (Tri-Rail) operates a 67-mile commuter rail system connecting Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties in Florida. Tri-Rail has been adding service and new stations to meet increasing demand for the service. The line is carrying about 8,000 riders per day.


Tri-Rail's 5-year capital improvement program (1996-2000) includes the addition of a second track on part of the line, rehabilitation of the signal system, station improvements and parking expansion. The capital program is estimated to cost $428.3 million.

Status

The construction of Phase I of the double tracking/signal rehabilitation project began in the Spring of 1995 and has an estimated completion date of April 1997. Phases II and III, each of which include two stations, are currently in design. Environmental requirements have been satisfied with categorical exclusions.


There is no ISTEA authorization for Tri-Rail improvements. In fiscal years 1993 through 1996, Congress has appropriated $34.38 million in Section 5309 New Start funds for Tri-Rail improvements. These funds are being used for station improvements, bridge rehabilitation, and double tracking.

Justification

Mobility Improvements - Double tracking and signal rehabilitation will enable the establishment of 30-minute commuter rail headways, compared with one hour headways today, and will enhance the safety of the rail operation. Originally designed for the exclusive use of freight operations, the signaling system along the CSX corridor was installed more than 50 years ago and has long been outdated, particularly in light of increased traffic and the diversified nature of the rail corridor usage today. As a result of the antiquated signaling system, Tri-Rail is required to reduce its speed at some meets from 70 mph to 20 mph. This affects the overall running time, and is a safety concern with the increased rail traffic along this busy corridor. Service reliability would improve dramatically with the installation of modern signal equipment.


Cost Effectiveness - A cost effectiveness index is not available.


Environmental Benefits - Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and West Palm Beach have been redesignated as an attainment/maintenance area.


Operating Efficiencies - Information on the operating cost per passenger is not available.


Local
Financial
Commitment

Tri-Rail is proposing a Section 5309 New Start funding share of $189.5 million or 44 percent. The remaining funds would be derived from the Section 5307 formula program and the State of Florida. FTA has not seen a detailed financing plan, and thus has not evaluated the capital finance plan or the stability and reliability of operating assistance.


Tri-Rail Five Year Program
Proposed Source of Funds Total Funding
($million)
Description
Federal:
Section 5309 New Start
$189.50 $34.38 million appropriated through FY 1996
Section 5307 $56.39 N/A
State: $182.40 N/A
TOTAL $428.29

Note: Funding proposal reflects assumptions made by project sponsors, and are not DOT or FTA assumptions.

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MARC Frederick Extension & Rolling Stock Procurement

Maryland

(November 1, 1995)

Description

The Mass Transit Administration (MTA) of Maryland is extending the Maryland Commuter Rail (MARC) system to provide service from Point of Rocks to Frederick, Maryland. The MARC system presently consists of two lines between Washington, D. C., and Baltimore, Maryland, and a third line between Washington, D. C., and Martinsburg, West Virginia. In addition, MTA is embarking on a major procurement of additional commuter rail coaches and locomotives for MARC to meet anticipated system-wide demand. The estimated cost of these projects is $131.6 million. Ridership forecast for the year 2010 is 1,600 daily passengers on this extension.

Status

Section 3035(nn)(2) of ISTEA directed FTA to enter into a full funding grant agreement with MTA totaling $160 million, including $60 million in fiscal year 1993 and $50 million in fiscal years 1994 and 1995, to carry out MARC service extensions and other improvements including the purchase of rolling stock and station improvements and expansions. In fiscal years 1993 through 1996, Congress appropriated $57.1 million for the MARC service extensions and other improvements.


The Frederick extension will involve track, signal, and station improvements on an existing freight line. An environmental assessment has been completed, which resulted in a Finding of No Significant Impact. Two station sites have been selected and final design is underway. MTA expects to begin MARC commuter rail service on this extension in 1998.


In December 1994, the MTA began steps to purchase 50 bi-level commuter rail cars and six electric locomotives for systemwide capacity improvements throughout the MARC commuter rail system. This purchase is to be made, in part, with $66.5 million of New Start funds authorized in ISTEA. Final design of the coaches is completed and the manufacture of the coaches is underway. The MTA also plans to conduct some bridge clearance work near Union Station to accommodate the bi-level cars. That work is not part of the full funding grant agreement. MTA anticipates that the procurement of the locomotives will be done as a joint procurement with another entity.

Proposed Source of Funds Total Funding
($million)
Description
Federal:
Section 5309 New Start
(FFGA Amount)
$105.25 $23.78 million appropriated through FY 1996
Local: $26.31 N/A
TOTAL $131.56

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Largo Corridor

Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Area

(April 1, 1996)

Description

The Maryland Mass Transit Administration (MTA) is planning a 2.9-mile extension of the Washington Metrorail Blue Line from Addison Road to Largo. This addition would add two stations -- one at Ritchie Road and the other at Largo Town Center. Parking capacity would increase by 2,300. The proposed extension is beyond the 103-mile Metrorail system authorized by the National Capital Transportation Act of 1969, as amended.


The Largo extension is expected to cost $350 million (escalated dollars). Total daily transit ridership is estimated to be 27,170.

Status

Section 3035(nn)(3) of ISTEA directed FTA to enter into a full funding grant agreement with the State of Maryland or its designee for up to $5 million to carry out an alternatives analysis and preliminary engineering. Congress has not appropriated any funds for this study.


System planning requirements have been fulfilled. FTA approved the initiation of preliminary engineering on February 1, 1996.


The Addison Road to Largo Metrorail Extension project is included in the National Capital Region's Constrained Long Range Plan. It is also programmed in the State of Maryland's Statewide Transportation Improvement Program.

Justification

Mobility Improvements - According to the system planning study, the Largo extension would save 1100 hours of travel time per day (compared with a TSM alternative).


Cost Effectiveness - The cost effectiveness index is $12 per new rider.


Environmental Benefits - The Washington Metropolitan area is classified as a serious ozone nonattainment area and a moderate carbon monoxide nonattainment area. The planning study found that the proposed project would reduce vehicle miles travelled (VMT) on the highway system by 43,000 per day (compared with a TSM alternative).


Operating Efficiencies - The project's impact on the systemwide operating cost per passenger is not known.

Local
Financial
Commitment

MTA is proposing that 79 percent of the capital cost be derived from the Section 5309 New Start program. The remaining 21 percent would be derived from state's Transportation Trust Fund which is supported by several existing taxes and fees (motor vehicle fuel taxes, vehicle titling taxes, vehicle licensing and registration fees, and corporate income taxes).


The capital finance plan is rated "medium". While FTA has not seen a specific finance plan for the Largo extension, the state's Transportation Trust Fund is in place and has sufficient funds to supply the non-Federal share. Governor Glendenning has indicated that the Largo extension is a priority of his administration.


The stability and reliability of operating assistance are rated "low-medium". The funding arrangements and sources for operating and maintenance costs have not been identified. MTA projections assume Federal operating assistance will remain at present levels. In 1994, the average age of MTA's regional bus fleet was 12.7 years old, which is substantially above the national average.

Proposed Source of Funds Total Funding
($million)
Description
Federal:
Section 5309 New Start
$276.50 $0.0 million appropriated through FY 1996
State: $73.50 N/A
TOTAL $350.00

Note: Funding proposal reflects assumptions made by project sponsors, and are not DOT or FTA assumptions.

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Waldorf Corridor

Southern Maryland

(November 1, 1995)

Description

The Mass Transit Administration (MTA) of Maryland is considering extensions of the Maryland Commuter Rail (MARC) system to provide service to Washington, D.C. from Waldorf, Maryland. The MARC system presently consists of two lines between Washington and Baltimore and a third line between Washington and Martinsburg, West Virginia.

Status

FTA has provided planning funds to the Tri-County Council for Southern Maryland for a system planning study of transit alternatives. The corridor includes the Waldorf area, and commuter rail is one of the alternatives to be studied. Other alternatives under consideration include LRT, a busway, and HOV lanes. The Southern Maryland Mass Transportation Alternatives Study now underway is expected to be completed by early 1996. At that time, local and State officials will make a decision on how to proceed.


Section 3035(nn)(2) of ISTEA directed FTA to enter into a full funding grant agreement with MTA totaling $160 million, including $60 million in fiscal year 1993 and $50 million in fiscal years 1994 and 1995, to carry out MARC service extensions and other improvements statewide, including the purchase of rolling stock and station improvements and expansions. The Waldorf Corridor was specifically mentioned, but a subsequent technical amendment allows consideration of other options (e.g. , HOV, LRT) in the current corridor planning study. In fiscal years 1993 through 1996, Congress appropriated a total of $67.5 million for statewide MARC service extensions and other improvements.

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Phase I System Plan

Central Puget Sound (Seattle), Washington

(November 1, 1995)

Description

The three-county Central Puget Sound Regional Transit Authority (RTA) Board adopted a long range master plan for transit in the Seattle metropolitan area on October 29, 1994. Phase I of the plan (as defined for a March 1995 election) included a 71-mile LRT system from Tacoma north through Seattle to 164th Street (Lynnwood) and from Seattle east to Overlake via I-90 and Bellevue, 80-miles of commuter rail service from Lakewood north through Seattle to Everett (see Seattle-Tacoma Commuter Rail profile), and eight regional bus routes. It also included a technology study for the I-405 Corridor, a Transit Development Fund to support the regional system and facilities and a single regional fare structure. Phase I of the regional rail and bus plan was projected to cost $6.7 billion (1995 dollars) and take 16 years to implement.

Status

Section 3035(bbb) of ISTEA directed FTA to enter into a multiyear grant agreement with the Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle (predecessor to Metropolitan King County) in the amount of $300 million for the Puget Sound Rapid Transportation Project. No funds have been appropriated for this project.


An election on the financing plan for the proposed Phase I transit improvements was held on March 14, 1995. The RTA's proposal was defeated at the polls with a 47 percent "yes" and a 53 percent "no" vote. The ballot proposal called for 60 percent of the project cost to be funded from increases in motor vehicle excise and sales taxes. The financing plan called for $125 million annually from State and Federal sources during the 16 year implementation schedule.


The RTA has recently adopted a work program geared toward adopting a new ballot proposal by the spring of 1996 to be taken to the voters as early as September 1996. The RTA Board recently adopted guiding principles to assist in the development of a new proposal. In addition, the Board has established a panel of regional civic leaders to advise the Board on the best package of transportation improvements to propose in the new plan. The RTA has also engaged in a new round of public involvement activities to insure as broad a range of input as possible into the components of the new plan.


The revised Phase I will be developed through the major investment study (MIS) process.

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Seattle-Tacoma Commuter Rail

Central Puget Sound (Seattle), Washington

(November 1, 1995)

Description

The three county Central Puget Sound Regional Transit Authority (RTA) Board adopted a long range master plan for transit in the Seattle metropolitan area on October 29,1994. The plan consists of a regional, comprehensive system of services, including commuter rail service between Seattle and Tacoma, additional commuter rail service, LRT service and regional bus service. The Seattle-Tacoma Commuter Rail service is proposed to operate along approximately 40 miles of track between the two cities and includes stations in Tukwila, Kent, Auburn, Sumner, Puyallup and possibly Renton. The total capital cost of the project is estimated at $367 million (1995 dollars), including track up-grade, stations, parking facilities and rolling stock.

Status

Section 3035(ccc) of ISTEA directed FTA to negotiate and sign a $25 million, multiyear grant agreement with the Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle (predecessor to Metropolitan King County) for the Seattle-Tacoma Commuter Rail Project. In FYs 1992, 1993, and 1995, a total of $22.6 million was appropriated for the project. Of this amount $1.9 million was obligated for an environmental assessment and the RTA received a Letter of No Prejudice for a $1 million service demonstration in the corridor as well as service north to Everett. On March 14, 1995 the Phase I transit plan, including the commuter rail segment, was put before the public in a funding referendum and was defeated with a 47 percent "yes" 53 percent "no" vote. Much of the residual unobligated funding was rescinded by the Congress during FY 1995.


The RTA has recently adopted a work program geared toward adopting a new ballot proposal by the spring of 1996 to be taken to the voters as early as September 1996. The RTA Board recently adopted guiding principles to assist in the development of a new proposal. In addition, the Board has established a panel of regional civic leaders to advise the Board on the best package of transportation improvements to propose in the new plan. The RTA has also engaged in a new round of public involvement activities to insure as broad a range of input as possible into the components of the new plan.


The revised Phase I plan will be developed through the major investment study (MIS) process. Commuter rail between Tacoma and Seattle is currently envisioned to be a component of the new Phase I plan. An initial draft of an environmental assessment of the Seattle-Tacoma Commuter Rail project has not been formally issued awaiting completion of the revised Phase I plan.


The Seattle Metropolitan area has programmed $1 million of flexible (STP) funding assistance to be utilized in order to assist with completion of this planning.

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